adaptive switches for people with disabilities and special needs

 
 

Connections Strategies

adaptive switches for the disabled and special needsSwitches are at the core of access technology. What can appear to some as simply a "button" can —properly selected and installed—open worlds of access to communication devices, environmental controls, computer software, and mobile devices. Selecting the correct switch can be challenging, but AbleNet makes it easy. By following some simple guidelines, you can narrow the vast array of AbleNet switch options to a few appropriate choices.

  1. What is the most repeatable activation method—hands, head, mouth, muscle contraction, etc?
  2. What device needs to be controlled? What is its location and connection type?
  3. How does the switch need to be positioned for repeatable activation with the least possible fatigue for the user?
  4. Do cords limit successful interaction with products?

 

Common Situations

Situation 1
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Due to an accident, I am paralyzed from the neck down. My computer keeps my world open to me, and accessing it is very important.

Situation 2
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In my home, I need to use my head to activate a switch to turn my lamps on and off. As I move around in my chair, I don't want the cords to get tangled—or be limited by their length.

Situation 3
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In our classroom, we need to quickly change the switch set-up (color, symbols, positioning) depending on the activity and the student.

Situation 1

adaptive switches for the disabled and special needs

Due to an accident, I am paralyzed from the neck down. My computer keeps my world open to me, and accessing it is very important.

Applied Methodology

  1. Mouth and eye movement
  2. Computer access
  3. Body mounting
  4. Wireless is important, but not absolutely essential

AT Solution

Pneumatic Switch for disabled

Pneumatic Switch
Dual switch activated with either a "sip" or "puff" of the lips.
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Wireless switch with bluetooth

Blue2™ Switch
Add wireless connectivity with the Blue switch. Supports single and dual switch access.
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Gaze technology switch - TrackerPro

TrackerPro
TrackerPro offers computer access through eye gaze technology—combine with switch accessible software such as ScreenDoors or MagicCursor
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Situation 2

adaptive switches for the disabled and special needs

In my home, I need to use my head to activate a switch to turn my lamps on and off. As I move around in my chair, I don't want the cords to get tangled—or be limited by their length.

Applied Methodology

  1. Head movement
  2. Home lighting / power control
  3. Wheelchair mounting
  4. Wireless is essential to keep cords to a minimum

AT Solution

wireless switch - Jelly Beamer

Jelly Beamer™
The wireless Jelly Beamer is easy to set up and will work everywhere in the house.
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ECU PowerLink device

PowerLink® 4
PowerLink controls power to the lamps -- just plug them into the device
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ARM and apropriate mounting plate

Latitude™ ARM and rectangular mounting plate
The Latitude ARM and appropriate mounting plate are easy to install and adjust.
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Situation 3

adaptive switches for the disabled and special needs

In our classroom, we need to quickly change the switch set-up (color, symbols, positioning) depending on the activity and the student.

Applied Methodology

  1. Using hands primarily
  2. Communication and entertainment devices
  3. Basic tabletop mounting to keep the switch from moving
  4. Cords are okay

AT Solution

Switches for disabled - Big Red and Jelly Bean

Big Red® and Jelly Bean®
Choose one larger and one smaller switch for different target areas and sizes
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mounting solution with quick tabletop mounting

Cling!™
Cling provides a quick tabletop mounting solution that's easy to move and reposition.
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Educational products for disabled - All-Turn-It Spinner

All-Turn-It® Spinner
The new All-Turn-It spinner allows for direct, corded, and wireless switch access
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Flexiblle Communication Device for disabled

SuperTalker™
SuperTalker is a flexible, switch-accessible AAC device
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Additional Information

adaptive switches for the disabled and special needs table
 

Not sure which switch is right for you?  Download AbleNet's switch selection grid to compare features across our full line of single, dual/multiple and specialty switches.