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June 19, 2018, 02:00 pm CST - 60-minutes

Why is the Student Having Difficulty With Direct Access?

Your student is using Direct Access to control a speech generating device, but is struggling. How do you determine if the issue is motor-based or something else? If the client is struggling due to motor skills, what can be done to optimize Direct Access and when are other access methods more appropriate?

FREE

Michelle Lange

Michelle Lange

OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Michelle is an occupational therapist with 30 years of experience and has been in private practice, Access to Independence, for over 10 years. She is a well-respected lecturer, both nationally and internationally and has authored numerous texts, chapters, and articles. She is the editor of Fundamentals in Assistive Technology, 4th ed., NRRTS Continuing Education Curriculum Coordinator and Clinical Editor of Directions magazine. Michelle is on the teaching faculty of RESNA. Michelle is a member of the Clinician Task Force. Michelle is a certified ATP, certified SMS and is a Senior Disability Analyst of the ABDA.

Intermediate

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May 15, 2018, 02:00 pm CST - 60-minutes

How Do I Determine How the Student Can Access Augmentative Communication?

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) can provide communication for many non-verbal or difficult to understand students. However, the student must have the ability to “access” or control the device as efficiently as possible. This webinar will present general AAC access evaluation considerations.

FREE

Michelle Lange

Michelle Lange

OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Michelle is an occupational therapist with 30 years of experience and has been in private practice, Access to Independence, for over 10 years. She is a well-respected lecturer, both nationally and internationally and has authored numerous texts, chapters, and articles. She is the editor of Fundamentals in Assistive Technology, 4th ed., NRRTS Continuing Education Curriculum Coordinator and Clinical Editor of Directions magazine. Michelle is on the teaching faculty of RESNA. Michelle is a member of the Clinician Task Force. Michelle is a certified ATP, certified SMS and is a Senior Disability Analyst of the ABDA.

Intermediate

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October 24, 2017, 02:00 pm CST - 60-minutes

Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about Assistive Technology to Inform Your Practice – Part 1

This two part series will look at research about the selection, provision, and use of assistive technology for students with disabilities. It will include a review of the types of research being conducted and how each can be of value to you in the schools. Research about the use of augmentative communication and power mobility will be highlighted. Sources of AT research and references for all studies mentioned will be included.

FREE

Penny Reed

Penny Reed

PhD, MA

Penny Reed has a bachelor’s degree in Elementary and Special Education from Indiana University and master’s and doctoral degrees in Special Education from the University of Oregon. She has been a teacher, consultant and administrator in the field of special education and assistive technology. Dr. Reed regularly provides consultation and training on a variety of topics related to assistive technology with a special focus on helping school districts improve their delivery of assistive technology services. She is the author of numerous publications about assistive technology services.

Beginner

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December 14, 2017, 12:00 pm CST - 60-minutes

Early AACtion: Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication with the Birth to Five Population

Several myths about using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) with the birth-five population have been dispelled through research in the field of speech pathology. Early introduction of AAC has shown a positive impact on verbal speech, successful communication, and overall independence.

Learning objectives are as follows:
1. Attendees will briefly define AAC and some of its key components, as well as highlight the basic differences/give examples of a high tech/low tech AAC system.
2. Attendees will be able to dispel three “myths” about introducing an AAC system with birth-to-five children with language impairments and explain the benefits of introducing such a system as early on as possible.
3. Attendees will understand the concept of “Aided Language Input” and be able to explain its importance to a child’s development of language with an alternative communication system.

FREE

Meghan Reitz

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Meghan Reitz

M. Ed., CCC-SLP

Meghan Reitz is an SLP working at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU for four years. She received her Master’s in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Virginia in 2012. She has always had a passion for working with the pediatric population, which continues to grow through her work at Children’s Hospital’s outpatient, long term care unit and assistive technology center. She has been a member of the AT team since 2013 and has assisted in AT Recipes for Success mini-grant program and planning two CHoR AT Symposiums to provide education and collaboration for community therapists. She has presented at several regional, state, and nation-wide conferences on the topic of AAC and caregiver training. She completes evaluations and family trainings for children and adults who require augmentative and alternative communication to communicate. She also enjoys working with a very diverse population and has created several caregiver handouts in Spanish to assist with carryover of device implementation at home. She values the importance of training and providing education to caregivers in order to empower families to target communication at home and anywhere on-the-go.

Cary Hastings

Cary Hastings

M. Ed., CCC-SLP

Cary Hastings received her B.A. from Randolph-Macon College in 2008 and earned her M.Ed. in Communication Disorders from The University of Virginia in 2012. She has worked as a Speech-Language Pathologist at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU for four years, serving the birth to 21 population who present with a range of diagnoses and communication disorders. She specializes in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) usage and serves on the Assistive Technology Core team, providing transdisciplinary AAC evaluations, patient and caregiver training, and ongoing treatment in this area. She coordinates the hospital’s grant-funded ‘Ready, Set, Read’ program which provides books and therapy materials to patients to help families carryover therapy targets at home. Other areas of professional interest include working with children with pragmatic language needs and providing parent coaching for early language stimulation. When she is not working with children, she enjoys running, live music, and being outside with her husband and their yellow lab, Bedford.

Beginner

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November 30, 2017, 12:00 pm CST - 60-minutes

Cortical Visual Impairment: Assessment, Implications, and Adaptations for Successful AAC Use

After attending this webinar, participants will be able to identify 10 unique characteristics and behaviors assessed for individuals with diagnosis of cortical visual impairment (CVI); identify at least five environmental barriers for use of functional vision by a patient with CVI; identify at least five adaptations for an individual with CVI to support use of functional vision and increase successful use of an AAC system.

FREE

Lauren S. Andelin

Lauren S. Andelin

M.S., OTR/L

Lauren graduated from The University of Virginia in 2004 and Virginia Commonwealth University in 2009 with a Masters in Occupational Therapy. She has worked at Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU for 7 years and is on the AT Core team as well as a mentor in sensory processing disorder for new clinicians. Her caseload includes patients in out-patient therapy and on the Transitional Care Unit which provides pediatric long-term care. In 2012, Lauren completed the Virginia Leadership Education Program in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (Va-LEND) and is currently working toward her doctorate in OT through VCU. Specialty trainings in sensory integration including an advanced intensive mentorship for diagnosis and treatment of sensory processing disorders through the STAR center in Denver. Though her transdisciplinary practice on the AT team Lauren has developed a passion for collaboration with other disciplines to help children access communication and their environments.

Beginner/Intermediate

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