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August 08, 2017, 10:00 am CST - 1-hour

Pediatric and School Based AAC Evaluations

When evaluating and treating someone a child with a communication disorder therapist can have a long and tedious process in helping secure a device for a pediatric patient or a school based child. There are several steps involved from the initial evaluation to submitting a device submission report. What tools are available to help us streamline the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan on the report and IEP help the user acclimate to their device?

In this presentation, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for pediatric and/or school based communication device user. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of an AAC evaluation and treatment plan. During the presentation tools and strategies for having the most effective AAC evaluations and device submission reports will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process when working with school based children or pediatric therapy.

FREE

Rachell Westby

Rachell Westby

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachel Westby has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachel has 12 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and have worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. First serving as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioning to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program, which led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association. I am an experienced presenter, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. During the last 2 years, I have presented at the Children’s Hospital AT Symposium, CollaborATe in Richmond, VA as well as a host of support groups, medical clinics, and in-services on the topic of AT/AAC for the ALS patient and/or other eye-gaze users.

Beginner

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December 14, 2017, 12:00 pm CST - 60-minutes

Early AACtion: Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication with the Birth to Five Population

Several myths about using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) with the birth-five population have been dispelled through research in the field of speech pathology. Early introduction of AAC has shown a positive impact on verbal speech, successful communication, and overall independence.

Learning objectives are as follows:
1. Attendees will briefly define AAC and some of its key components, as well as highlight the basic differences/give examples of a high tech/low tech AAC system.
2. Attendees will be able to dispel three “myths” about introducing an AAC system with birth-to-five children with language impairments and explain the benefits of introducing such a system as early on as possible.
3. Attendees will understand the concept of “Aided Language Input” and be able to explain its importance to a child’s development of language with an alternative communication system.

FREE

Meghan Reitz

&

Meghan Reitz

M. Ed., CCC-SLP

Meghan Reitz is an SLP working at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU for four years. She received her Master’s in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Virginia in 2012. She has always had a passion for working with the pediatric population, which continues to grow through her work at Children’s Hospital’s outpatient, long term care unit and assistive technology center. She has been a member of the AT team since 2013 and has assisted in AT Recipes for Success mini-grant program and planning two CHoR AT Symposiums to provide education and collaboration for community therapists. She has presented at several regional, state, and nation-wide conferences on the topic of AAC and caregiver training. She completes evaluations and family trainings for children and adults who require augmentative and alternative communication to communicate. She also enjoys working with a very diverse population and has created several caregiver handouts in Spanish to assist with carryover of device implementation at home. She values the importance of training and providing education to caregivers in order to empower families to target communication at home and anywhere on-the-go.

Cary Hastings

Cary Hastings

M. Ed., CCC-SLP

Cary Hastings received her B.A. from Randolph-Macon College in 2008 and earned her M.Ed. in Communication Disorders from The University of Virginia in 2012. She has worked as a Speech-Language Pathologist at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU for four years, serving the birth to 21 population who present with a range of diagnoses and communication disorders. She specializes in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) usage and serves on the Assistive Technology Core team, providing transdisciplinary AAC evaluations, patient and caregiver training, and ongoing treatment in this area. She coordinates the hospital’s grant-funded ‘Ready, Set, Read’ program which provides books and therapy materials to patients to help families carryover therapy targets at home. Other areas of professional interest include working with children with pragmatic language needs and providing parent coaching for early language stimulation. When she is not working with children, she enjoys running, live music, and being outside with her husband and their yellow lab, Bedford.

Beginner

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November 30, 2017, 12:00 pm CST - 60-minutes

Cortical Visual Impairment: Assessment, Implications, and Adaptations for Successful AAC Use

After attending this webinar, participants will be able to identify 10 unique characteristics and behaviors assessed for individuals with diagnosis of cortical visual impairment (CVI); identify at least five environmental barriers for use of functional vision by a patient with CVI; identify at least five adaptations for an individual with CVI to support use of functional vision and increase successful use of an AAC system.

FREE

Lauren S. Andelin

Lauren S. Andelin

M.S., OTR/L

Lauren graduated from The University of Virginia in 2004 and Virginia Commonwealth University in 2009 with a Masters in Occupational Therapy. She has worked at Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU for 7 years and is on the AT Core team as well as a mentor in sensory processing disorder for new clinicians. Her caseload includes patients in out-patient therapy and on the Transitional Care Unit which provides pediatric long-term care. In 2012, Lauren completed the Virginia Leadership Education Program in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (Va-LEND) and is currently working toward her doctorate in OT through VCU. Specialty trainings in sensory integration including an advanced intensive mentorship for diagnosis and treatment of sensory processing disorders through the STAR center in Denver. Though her transdisciplinary practice on the AT team Lauren has developed a passion for collaboration with other disciplines to help children access communication and their environments.

Beginner/Intermediate

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