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November 16, 2017, 11:00 am CST - 60-minutes

Practical Uses of QIAT :Session 2 – School districts using QIAT to improve assistive technology services

The Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology Services (QIAT) describe the characteristics of high-quality assistive technology services as they are provided in school settings. The eight service areas include: Consideration of AT Needs, Assessment of AT Needs, AT in the IEP, AT Implementation, Evaluation of Effectiveness of AT, AT in Transition, Administrative Support for AT, and AT Professional Development. For more than 15 years the indicators have been used in a variety of ways to assess assistive technology services and guide improvement efforts.

This AbleNet University webinar series will describe practical ways that parents, families and advocates; school districts and; state and regional programs use the QIAT Indicators and resources on behalf of children with disabilities who use assistive technology.
Session 2: How can the QIAT help school districts as they work to offer high quality assistive technology services aligned to federal, state and local mandates? How can QIAT be used as a tool for assistive technology service providers as they evaluate and work to continually improve their services? This session will address these questions and offer many examples of ways that QIAT has been used at a school-district level.

FREE

Terry Foss

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Terry Foss

M.Ed.

Foss has a B.S. from Fort Hays State University and a M. Ed. from the University of Kansas. She has been a special educator for 35 plus years in classrooms for students with severe multiple differences, autism, trainable mental differences, physical differences, and for the last 20 plus years as an AT resource facilitator for the Shawnee Mission School District in Kansas. She has certifications in regular elementary education; trainable mentally handicapped, educable mentally handicapped, and severely multiply handicapped. Terry is the co-author of Every Move Counts and Every Move Counts, Clicks and Chats.

Sue McCloskey

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Sue McCloskey

MS, CCC-SLP

Susan McCloskey, MS, CCC-SLP, is a speech language pathologist who worked for the PA Assistive Technology Center/PaTTAN in Pennsylvania and is now Chairperson of the Volusia Adaptive Assistive Technology Team (VAATT) in Daytona Beach, FL. She is a past Steering Committee member for ASHA's Division 12: Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Susan has consulted nationwide with teams whose focus has been to integrate assistive technology into the classroom. She has been a trainer of Environmental Communication Teaching (ECT) since 1989. She is currently involved in implementing the SCERTS project, focused on students on the Autism Spectrum, in her district and lives in Ponce Inlet, FL.

Kathy Lalk

Kathy Lalk

MS, BS

Kathy Lalk has a B.S. in Therapeutic Recreation, a M.S. in Educational Technology; and an Assistive Technology Professional (ATP) Certification by RESNA. Kathy works as an assistive technology specialist for a public school district. Her work includes support of students with disabilities, their families and their educational team in the consideration, implementation and evaluation of the use of assistive technology. Kathy is a Recreation Therapist; Lekotek Leader, CompuPlay Leader; Supervisor in Infant/Toddler program; and parent of 3 children.

Beginner

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November 30, 2017, 12:00 pm CST - 60-minutes

Cortical Visual Impairment: Assessment, Implications, and Adaptations for Successful AAC Use

After attending this webinar, participants will be able to identify 10 unique characteristics and behaviors assessed for individuals with diagnosis of cortical visual impairment (CVI); identify at least five environmental barriers for use of functional vision by a patient with CVI; identify at least five adaptations for an individual with CVI to support use of functional vision and increase successful use of an AAC system.

FREE

Lauren S. Andelin

Lauren S. Andelin

M.S., OTR/L

Lauren graduated from The University of Virginia in 2004 and Virginia Commonwealth University in 2009 with a Masters in Occupational Therapy. She has worked at Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU for 7 years and is on the AT Core team as well as a mentor in sensory processing disorder for new clinicians. Her caseload includes patients in out-patient therapy and on the Transitional Care Unit which provides pediatric long-term care. In 2012, Lauren completed the Virginia Leadership Education Program in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (Va-LEND) and is currently working toward her doctorate in OT through VCU. Specialty trainings in sensory integration including an advanced intensive mentorship for diagnosis and treatment of sensory processing disorders through the STAR center in Denver. Though her transdisciplinary practice on the AT team Lauren has developed a passion for collaboration with other disciplines to help children access communication and their environments.

Beginner/Intermediate

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December 06, 2017, 11:00 am CST - 60-minutes

Practical Uses of QIAT: Session 3 – State, Regional and Local Programs using QIAT to Improve and Sustain AT Service Delivery

The Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology Services (QIAT) describe the characteristics of high-quality assistive technology services as they are provided in school settings. The eight service areas include: Consideration of AT Needs, Assessment of AT Needs, AT in the IEP, AT Implementation, Evaluation of Effectiveness of AT, AT in Transition, Administrative Support for AT, and AT Professional Development. For more than 15 years the indicators have been used in a variety of ways to assess assistive technology services and guide improvement efforts.

This AbleNet University webinar series will describe practical ways that parents, families and advocates; school districts and; state and regional programs use the QIAT Indicators and resources on behalf of children with disabilities who use assistive technology.
Session 3: Those in leadership positions at all levels use the Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology (QIAT) in various intentional ways to improve service provision. The Quality Indicators provide guidance in developing judicious and equitable policies and practices related to assistive technology services. Additionally in practical use, QIAT can be used as a self-assessment tool to develop improvement plans and plan for sustainable practices across service areas. Join us to learn more about building sustained service provision.

FREE

Joan Breslin-Larson

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Joan Breslin-Larson

M.Ed.

Joan Breslin-Larson, M.Ed., is the supervisor for low incidence disabilities and special education workforce at the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE), where she has worked since 1999. She brings many years of experiences as an independent assistive technology consultant and adult educator to her work at MDE. Joan is the parent of 3 children, all of whom are now adults, one of whom had an IEP.

Diana Foster Carl

Diana Foster Carl

M.A., L.S.S.P.

Diana Foster Carl, M.A., L.S.S.P., is a Licensed Specialist in School Psychology in Texas with more than 30 years’ experience in various capacities in public education. Diana is a former Director of Special Education Services at Region 4 Education Service Center in Houston, Texas and was lead facilitator of the Texas Assistive Technology Network for twelve years. Currently, Diana contracts with CAST as the Special Projects Coordinator for the National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials. Diana’s daughter has cerebral palsy and uses a power wheelchair for mobility.

Beginner

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December 14, 2017, 12:00 pm CST - 60-minutes

Early AACtion: Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication with the Birth to Five Population

Several myths about using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) with the birth-five population have been dispelled through research in the field of speech pathology. Early introduction of AAC has shown a positive impact on verbal speech, successful communication, and overall independence.

Learning objectives are as follows:
1. Attendees will briefly define AAC and some of its key components, as well as highlight the basic differences/give examples of a high tech/low tech AAC system.
2. Attendees will be able to dispel three “myths” about introducing an AAC system with birth-to-five children with language impairments and explain the benefits of introducing such a system as early on as possible.
3. Attendees will understand the concept of “Aided Language Input” and be able to explain its importance to a child’s development of language with an alternative communication system.

FREE

Meghan Reitz

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Meghan Reitz

M. Ed., CCC-SLP

Meghan Reitz is an SLP working at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU for four years. She received her Master’s in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Virginia in 2012. She has always had a passion for working with the pediatric population, which continues to grow through her work at Children’s Hospital’s outpatient, long term care unit and assistive technology center. She has been a member of the AT team since 2013 and has assisted in AT Recipes for Success mini-grant program and planning two CHoR AT Symposiums to provide education and collaboration for community therapists. She has presented at several regional, state, and nation-wide conferences on the topic of AAC and caregiver training. She completes evaluations and family trainings for children and adults who require augmentative and alternative communication to communicate. She also enjoys working with a very diverse population and has created several caregiver handouts in Spanish to assist with carryover of device implementation at home. She values the importance of training and providing education to caregivers in order to empower families to target communication at home and anywhere on-the-go.

Cary Hastings

Cary Hastings

M. Ed., CCC-SLP

Cary Hastings received her B.A. from Randolph-Macon College in 2008 and earned her M.Ed. in Communication Disorders from The University of Virginia in 2012. She has worked as a Speech-Language Pathologist at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU for four years, serving the birth to 21 population who present with a range of diagnoses and communication disorders. She specializes in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) usage and serves on the Assistive Technology Core team, providing transdisciplinary AAC evaluations, patient and caregiver training, and ongoing treatment in this area. She coordinates the hospital’s grant-funded ‘Ready, Set, Read’ program which provides books and therapy materials to patients to help families carryover therapy targets at home. Other areas of professional interest include working with children with pragmatic language needs and providing parent coaching for early language stimulation. When she is not working with children, she enjoys running, live music, and being outside with her husband and their yellow lab, Bedford.

Beginner

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