Integrating the 8 Standards for Mathematical Practice Into Your Daily Lessons – Part 2

Part 2 - Standards for Mathematical Practice 5-8

Teachers want their students to develop a mathematical mindset and see math in the world around them. No matter your grade level, the eight mathematical practice standards are a guide to good math instruction. These sessions will give you suggestions for incorporating them into your everyday math class. Integrating the 8 Standards for Mathematical Practice Into Your Daily Lessons - Part 2 Standards 5-8 Handout

Janet Stramel

Janet Stramel

M.S., Ph.D.

Dr. Janet Stramel is an Associate Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Fort Hays State University. She received a BS degree in Middle School Mathematics from the University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK; an M.S. degree in Curriculum & Instruction with an emphasis in mathematics education from Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS; and a Ph.D. in Curriculum & Instruction from Kansas State University. She was a middle school mathematics teacher in Guthrie, OK from 1985-2001 and Wamego, KS from 2001-2009. During her time at FHSU, Dr. Stramel has taught classes in teacher education with a focus on mathematics methods as well as classes for the Department of Mathematics. She was the Director of Assessment and Accreditation and appointed as Interim Chair of the Department of Teacher Education at FHSU during the 2015-16 academic year.

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Integrating the 8 Standards for Mathematical Practice Into Your Daily Lessons – Part 1

Part 1 - Standards for Mathematical Practice 1-4

Teachers want their students to develop a mathematical mindset and see math in the world around them. No matter your grade level, the eight mathematical practice standards are a guide to good math instruction. These sessions will give you suggestions for incorporating them into your everyday math class. Integrating the 8 Standards for Mathematical Practice Into Your Daily Lessons – Part 1 Handout

Janet Stramel

Janet Stramel

M.S., Ph.D.

Dr. Janet Stramel is an Associate Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Fort Hays State University. She received a BS degree in Middle School Mathematics from the University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK; an M.S. degree in Curriculum & Instruction with an emphasis in mathematics education from Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS; and a Ph.D. in Curriculum & Instruction from Kansas State University. She was a middle school mathematics teacher in Guthrie, OK from 1985-2001 and Wamego, KS from 2001-2009. During her time at FHSU, Dr. Stramel has taught classes in teacher education with a focus on mathematics methods as well as classes for the Department of Mathematics. She was the Director of Assessment and Accreditation and appointed as Interim Chair of the Department of Teacher Education at FHSU during the 2015-16 academic year.

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Modifying a Home to Promote Independence and Healthy Lifestyles for People

Living with people on the Autism Spectrum can be a stressful experience but it doesn’t always have to be. There are many areas in a home environment that can be adapted to make the home a happy home. A home where lifestyles are healthy and independence is nurtured. A home to work, play, learn and live in. Not only do children need to learn to adapt to the environment, but the environment also needs to be shaped- to stimulate or calm, provide order, encourage interests, talents, and successes and to give and maintain control to parents and caregivers. Areas addressed in this presentation include: space to eat, sleep, and work, color, clutter, visual/auditory/sensory input, home safety, elopement, attitude, and assistive technology devices that will support learning, playing and day to day living. Modifying a Home to Promote Independence and Healthy Lifestyles for People Handout

Stephanie Rauscher

Stephanie Rauscher

ATP

I have been a Physical Therapist Assistant for 40 years and have spent the last 36 years employed at Upstate Cerebral Palsy in Utica, NY. I presently work with developmentally disabled adults in a Day Habilitation setting, but have also worked with pre-school and school aged children. I provide PT services to the people we support, write justifications for wheelchairs and durable medical equipment, and am involved in accessibility for ICF’s, IRA’s, and self-direction homes. I have been an ATP for the last 10 years and have provided assessments for home modifications through a waiver grant and for individuals serviced by ACCESS-VR. In 2013, I developed a consulting business for home modifications and assistive technology needs for people with varying abilities called Dwell In Peace LLC.

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Positioning: How Do I Provide Alternative Positioning in the Classroom?

Part 2 of a 3 Part Series When working with young students, children may spend time outside of the wheelchair and in other positions. This webinar will discuss simple tips for providing a variety of appropriate positions outside the wheelchair in the classroom. Positioning: How Do I Provide Alternative Positioning in the Classroom? Handout

Michelle Lange

Michelle Lange

OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS


Michelle is an occupational therapist with 30 years of experience and has been in private practice, Access to Independence, for over 10 years. She is a well-respected lecturer, both nationally and internationally and has authored numerous texts, chapters, and articles. She is the co-editor of Seating and Wheeled Mobility: a clinical resource guide, editor of Fundamentals in Assistive Technology, 4th ed., NRRTS Continuing Education Curriculum Coordinator and Clinical Editor of Directions magazine. Michelle is on the teaching faculty of RESNA. Michelle is a member of the Clinician Task Force. Michelle is a certified ATP, certified SMS and is a Senior Disability Analyst of the ABDA.

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Positioning: How Do I Know if the Student is Positioned Adequately in Their Mobility Base?

Part 1 of a 3 Part Series We tend to position our bodies to match the task we are engaged in. If a student is not positioned well, they will be unable to use their body as functionally as possible. This webinar will present a simple checklist for determining if positioning is adequate.

Positioning: How Do I Know if the Student is Positioned Adequately in Their Mobility Base? Handout Positioning Checklist

Michelle Lange

Michelle Lange

OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS


Michelle is an occupational therapist with 30 years of experience and has been in private practice, Access to Independence, for over 10 years. She is a well-respected lecturer, both nationally and internationally and has authored numerous texts, chapters, and articles. She is the co-editor of Seating and Wheeled Mobility: a clinical resource guide, editor of Fundamentals in Assistive Technology, 4th ed., NRRTS Continuing Education Curriculum Coordinator and Clinical Editor of Directions magazine. Michelle is on the teaching faculty of RESNA. Michelle is a member of the Clinician Task Force. Michelle is a certified ATP, certified SMS and is a Senior Disability Analyst of the ABDA.

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Early AACtion: Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication with the Birth to Five Population

Several myths about using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) with the birth-five population have been dispelled through research in the field of speech pathology. Early introduction of AAC has shown a positive impact on verbal speech, successful communication, and overall independence.

Learning objectives are as follows:
1. Attendees will briefly define AAC and some of its key components, as well as highlight the basic differences/give examples of a high tech/low tech AAC system.
2. Attendees will be able to dispel three “myths” about introducing an AAC system with birth-to-five children with language impairments and explain the benefits of introducing such a system as early on as possible.
3. Attendees will understand the concept of “Aided Language Input” and be able to explain its importance to a child’s development of language with an alternative communication system.
Early AACtion: Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication with the Birth to Five Population - Handout Early AACtion: Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication with the Birth to Five Population - Additional Handout

Meghan Reitz

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Meghan Reitz

M. Ed., CCC-SLP

Meghan Reitz is an SLP working at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU for four years. She received her Master’s in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Virginia in 2012. She has always had a passion for working with the pediatric population, which continues to grow through her work at Children’s Hospital’s outpatient, long term care unit and assistive technology center. She has been a member of the AT team since 2013 and has assisted in AT Recipes for Success mini-grant program and planning two CHoR AT Symposiums to provide education and collaboration for community therapists. She has presented at several regional, state, and nation-wide conferences on the topic of AAC and caregiver training. She completes evaluations and family trainings for children and adults who require augmentative and alternative communication to communicate. She also enjoys working with a very diverse population and has created several caregiver handouts in Spanish to assist with carryover of device implementation at home. She values the importance of training and providing education to caregivers in order to empower families to target communication at home and anywhere on-the-go.

Cary Hastings

Cary Hastings

M. Ed., CCC-SLP

Cary Hastings received her B.A. from Randolph-Macon College in 2008 and earned her M.Ed. in Communication Disorders from The University of Virginia in 2012. She has worked as a Speech-Language Pathologist at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU for four years, serving the birth to 21 population who present with a range of diagnoses and communication disorders. She specializes in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) usage and serves on the Assistive Technology Core team, providing transdisciplinary AAC evaluations, patient and caregiver training, and ongoing treatment in this area. She coordinates the hospital’s grant-funded ‘Ready, Set, Read’ program which provides books and therapy materials to patients to help families carryover therapy targets at home. Other areas of professional interest include working with children with pragmatic language needs and providing parent coaching for early language stimulation. When she is not working with children, she enjoys running, live music, and being outside with her husband and their yellow lab, Bedford.

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Cortical Visual Impairment: Assessment, Implications, and Adaptations for Successful AAC Use

After attending this webinar, participants will be able to identify 10 unique characteristics and behaviors assessed for individuals with diagnosis of cortical visual impairment (CVI); identify at least five environmental barriers for use of functional vision by a patient with CVI; identify at least five adaptations for an individual with CVI to support use of functional vision and increase successful use of an AAC system.

Cortical Visual Impairment- Assessment, Implications, and Adaptations for Successful AAC Use Handout

Lauren S. Andelin

Lauren S. Andelin

M.S., OTR/L

Lauren graduated from The University of Virginia in 2004 and Virginia Commonwealth University in 2009 with a Masters in Occupational Therapy. She has worked at Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU for 7 years and is on the AT Core team as well as a mentor in sensory processing disorder for new clinicians. Her caseload includes patients in out-patient therapy and on the Transitional Care Unit which provides pediatric long-term care. In 2012, Lauren completed the Virginia Leadership Education Program in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (Va-LEND) and is currently working toward her doctorate in OT through VCU. She has received specialty training in sensory integration including an advanced intensive mentorship for diagnosis and treatment of sensory processing disorders through the STAR center in Denver. Through her trans-disciplinary practice on the AT team Lauren has developed a passion for collaboration with other disciplines to help children access communication and their environments.

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Practical Uses of QIAT Session 3: State, Regional and Local Programs using QIAT to Improve and Sustain AT Service Delivery

The Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology Services (QIAT) describe the characteristics of high-quality assistive technology services as they are provided in school settings. The eight service areas include: Consideration of AT Needs, Assessment of AT Needs, AT in the IEP, AT Implementation, Evaluation of Effectiveness of AT, AT in Transition, Administrative Support for AT, and AT Professional Development. For more than 15 years the indicators have been used in a variety of ways to assess assistive technology services and guide improvement efforts.

Practical Uses of QIAT Session 3: State, Regional and Local Programs using QIAT to Improve and Sustain AT Service Delivery Handout

Joan Breslin-Larson

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Joan Breslin-Larson

M.Ed.

Joan Breslin-Larson, M.Ed., is the supervisor for low incidence disabilities and special education workforce at the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE), where she has worked since 1999. She brings many years of experiences as an independent assistive technology consultant and adult educator to her work at MDE. Joan is the parent of 3 children, all of whom are now adults, one of whom had an IEP.

Diana Foster Carl

Diana Foster Carl

M.A., L.S.S.P.

Diana Foster Carl, M.A., L.S.S.P., is a Licensed Specialist in School Psychology in Texas with more than 30 years’ experience in various capacities in public education. Diana is a former Director of Special Education Services at Region 4 Education Service Center in Houston, Texas and was lead facilitator of the Texas Assistive Technology Network for twelve years. Currently, Diana contracts with CAST as the Special Projects Coordinator for the National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials. Diana’s daughter has cerebral palsy and uses a power wheelchair for mobility.

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Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about Assistive Technology to Inform Your Practice Part 2

This session will focus on research on the use of assistive technology for reading and writing for students with disabilities, including the latest analysis and reviews. Sources of AT research and references for all studies mentioned will be included.

Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about AT to Inform Your Practice – Part 2 Handout Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about AT to Inform Your Practice References

Penny Reed

Penny Reed

PhD, MA

Penny Reed has a bachelor’s degree in Elementary and Special Education from Indiana University and master’s and doctoral degrees in Special Education from the University of Oregon. She has been a teacher, consultant and administrator in the field of special education and assistive technology. Dr. Reed regularly provides consultation and training on a variety of topics related to assistive technology with a special focus on helping school districts improve their delivery of assistive technology services. She is the author of numerous publications about assistive technology services.

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Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about Assistive Technology to Inform Your Practice Part 1

This two part series will look at research about the selection, provision, and use of assistive technology for students with disabilities. It will include a review of the types of research being conducted and how each can be of value to you in the schools. Research about the use of augmentative communication and power mobility will be highlighted. Sources of AT research and references for all studies mentioned will be included.

Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about AT to Inform Your Practice - Part 1 Handout Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about AT to Inform Your Practice - References

Penny Reed

Penny Reed

PhD, MA

Penny Reed has a bachelor’s degree in Elementary and Special Education from Indiana University and master’s and doctoral degrees in Special Education from the University of Oregon. She has been a teacher, consultant and administrator in the field of special education and assistive technology. Dr. Reed regularly provides consultation and training on a variety of topics related to assistive technology with a special focus on helping school districts improve their delivery of assistive technology services. She is the author of numerous publications about assistive technology services.

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