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Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about Assistive Technology to Inform Your Practice – Part 1

This two part series will look at research about the selection, provision, and use of assistive technology for students with disabilities. It will include a review of the types of research being conducted and how each can be of value to you in the schools. Research about the use of augmentative communication and power mobility will be highlighted. Sources of AT research and references for all studies mentioned will be included.

Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about AT to Inform Your Practice - Part 1 Handout Finding, Understanding, and Using Research about AT to Inform Your Practice - References

Penny Reed

Penny Reed

PhD, MA

Penny Reed has a bachelor’s degree in Elementary and Special Education from Indiana University and master’s and doctoral degrees in Special Education from the University of Oregon. She has been a teacher, consultant and administrator in the field of special education and assistive technology. Dr. Reed regularly provides consultation and training on a variety of topics related to assistive technology with a special focus on helping school districts improve their delivery of assistive technology services. She is the author of numerous publications about assistive technology services.

Beginner

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Pediatric and School Based AAC Evaluations

When evaluating and treating someone a child with a communication disorder therapist can have a long and tedious process in helping secure a device for a pediatric patient or a school based child. There are several steps involved from the initial evaluation to submitting a device submission report. What tools are available to help us streamline the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan on the report and IEP help the user acclimate to their device?

In this presentation, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for pediatric and/or school based communication device user. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of an AAC evaluation and treatment plan. During the presentation tools and strategies for having the most effective AAC evaluations and device submission reports will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process when working with school based children or pediatric therapy.
Pediatric and School Based AAC Evaluation Handout.

Rachell Westby

Rachell Westby

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachel Westby has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachel has 12 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and have worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. First serving as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioning to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program, which led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association. I am an experienced presenter, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. During the last 2 years, I have presented at the Children’s Hospital AT Symposium, CollaborATe in Richmond, VA as well as a host of support groups, medical clinics, and in-services on the topic of AT/AAC for the ALS patient and/or other eye-gaze users.

Beginner

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Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations – Session 3

Session 3: Eye Gaze Evaluation and Treatment Plan

When evaluating and treating someone with a communication disorder coupled with severe physical impairments, eye gaze can often be one of the products we as evaluators will need to try. Pediatric and adult eye gaze evaluations are challenging not only because they require knowledge of high tech equipment, but also because of the steps involved from the initial consultation to device submission. Most importantly, for the therapist, it doesn’t end there. What tools are available to help us through the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts of eye gaze report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan help the user acclimate to their device?
In this presentation series, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for eye gaze. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of the eye gaze evaluation and treatment process. During the presentation series resources for having the most effective eye gaze evaluations, report writing skills, and treatment plan after the device arrives will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process whether working with pediatrics or adults.
Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations - Session 3- Handout

Rachell Westby

Rachell Westby

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachel Westby has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachel has 12 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and have worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. First serving as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioning to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program, which led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association. I am an experienced presenter, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. During the last 2 years, I have presented at the Children’s Hospital AT Symposium, CollaborATe in Richmond, VA as well as a host of support groups, medical clinics, and in-services on the topic of AT/AAC for the ALS patient and/or other eye-gaze users.

Beginner

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Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations – Session 2

Session 2: Eye Gaze Evaluation Effective Report Writing (case studies)

When evaluating and treating someone with a communication disorder coupled with severe physical impairments, eye gaze can often be one of the products we as evaluators will need to try. Pediatric and adult eye gaze evaluations are challenging not only because they require knowledge of high tech equipment, but also because of the steps involved from the initial consultation to device submission. Most importantly, for the therapist, it doesn’t end there. What tools are available to help us through the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts of eye gaze report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan help the user acclimate to their device?
In this presentation series, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for eye gaze. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of the eye gaze evaluation and treatment process. During the presentation series resources for having the most effective eye gaze evaluations, report writing skills, and treatment plan after the device arrives will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process whether working with pediatrics or adults.
Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations - Session 2 Handout

Rachell Westby

Rachell Westby

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachel Westby has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachel has 12 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and have worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. First serving as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioning to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program, which led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association. I am an experienced presenter, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. During the last 2 years, I have presented at the Children’s Hospital AT Symposium, CollaborATe in Richmond, VA as well as a host of support groups, medical clinics, and in-services on the topic of AT/AAC for the ALS patient and/or other eye-gaze users.

Beginner

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Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations – Session 1

Session 1: Eye Gaze Evaluation: Tools and Process

When evaluating and treating someone with a communication disorder coupled with severe physical impairments, eye gaze can often be one of the products we as evaluators will need to try. Pediatric and adult eye gaze evaluations are challenging not only because they require knowledge of high tech equipment, but also because of the steps involved from the initial consultation to device submission. Most importantly, for the therapist, it doesn’t end there. What tools are available to help us through the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts of eye gaze report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan help the user acclimate to their device?
In this presentation series, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for eye gaze. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of the eye gaze evaluation and treatment process. During the presentation series resources for having the most effective eye gaze evaluations, report writing skills, and treatment plan after the device arrives will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process whether working with pediatrics or adults.
Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations - Session 1 Handout

Rachell Westby

Rachell Westby

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachel Westby has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachel has 12 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and have worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. First serving as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioning to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program, which led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association. I am an experienced presenter, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. During the last 2 years, I have presented at the Children’s Hospital AT Symposium, CollaborATe in Richmond, VA as well as a host of support groups, medical clinics, and in-services on the topic of AT/AAC for the ALS patient and/or other eye-gaze users.

Beginner

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How to Create the Right Environment for Successful AAC use in the Classroom

Learn about the newest technology for AAC users - Location Awareness with Beacons. As educators, it is imperative that we are fluent in the use of digital devices. It is our job to teach our students how to be independent AND to help them develop functional skills with technology. Studies in the visual cognitive sciences have argued that we need to bring the environment into the AAC. This webinar is designed to improve your digital fluency and show you how to teach appropriate iPad behaviors to student with special needs. Learn how to use location awareness technology built in to SuperSpeak AAC which is a easy way to bring the environment in on the AAC. We will teach you how to best apply these findings in a classroom setting with your special needs learners. Participants will also get some hands on training on how to bring the environment into the AAC through location awareness technology built in to SuperSpeak AAC.

How to Create the Right Environment for Successful AAC use in the Classroom Handout

Kirsten McLeod

&

Kirsten McLeod

Kirsten is an app troubleshooting guru. She can teach anyone how to best customize their mobile device for their specific needs.

Katrine Gulstad Pedersen

Katrine Gulstad Pedersen

As a special needs teacher Katrine has ten plus years of experience working together with special needs children, their teachers, and parents. She has been a key driver for the implementation of digital tools and solutions in the Norwegian public schools and kindergartens, as well as establishing strategies for best practice.

Beginner

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Getting to Know Speak for Yourself

Speak for Yourself is an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) app that is helping thousands of individuals with complex communication needs have a voice. Children as young as 11 months and adults pursuing a college degree are using it to successfully meet the communication needs in their lives. Learn about the evidence-based research and experience-based features that make Speak for Yourself complex enough to be functional for a range of AAC users and simple enough to be supported by parents and professionals.

Getting to Know Speak for Yourself Handout

Heidi LoStracco

Heidi LoStracco

MS, CCC-SLP

Heidi LoStracco, MS, CCC-SLP holds a Bachelor's Degree in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences from Temple University, a Master's Degree in Speech-Language Pathology from LaSalle University, American Speech, Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) certification, and a New Jersey and Pennsylvania Speech-Language Pathology license.

For the last 10 years, Mrs. LoStracco has focused on augmentative and alternative communication for students who have complex communication needs (CCN). She is one of the creators of the Speak for Yourself AAC app and has a vast knowledge base in regard to communication devices, AAC apps and implementation in the school setting. She continues to work daily with students and young adults who have CCN and use AAC to communicate.

Beginner

AAC | SGDs | Apps

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Funding SGDs for Students in Transition and “Can I Fund Their iPad?” The Answer Is…

Students and young adults transitioning out from under the special education umbrella face a daunting array of funding and service delivery challenges. Critical issues for transition-aged students using SGDs include how to continue to use, support, and legally own their SGD in the future. Aggressive planning long before transition helps predict evolving needs for communication at work, supported living environments, college, social settings, and a variety of other environments. No person should be left without an SGD or settle for an inferior system as they go out into the world as an adult. This webinar highlights strategies for SGD transition planning, identifying mechanisms for funding SGDs during transition, and includes a candid description of what constitutes a fundable SGD.

Chris Gibbons

Chris Gibbons

PhD, CCC/SLP

Prior to his role as Director of SGD Services at AbleNet, Chris worked in a variety of clinical and research settings as a private practitioner, assistive technology specialist, researcher, industry representative and policy level consultant. His research interests are rooted in AAC user efficiency, communication partner supports, and alternative access methods for people who are functionally locked-in. Most recently, Chris has been a private practitioner specializing in AAC evaluations and implementation and working on projects supporting financial independence for people with disabilities.

Beginner

Funding | SGDs | AAC | iPad

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The Importance Of Customizing Your AAC App – What Is Possible And What You Should Consider

There are many hundreds of communication apps on the market and identifying the best fit to meet the needs of an individual user can be, well – complicated! Perhaps what we should consider is how well an app can be customized to meet those needs and create that perfect fit. This webinar will focus on what considerations to take into account when it comes to customization – what age is the user? What is the ability of the user? Does the user have a visual impairment? Does the user require a switch? We will then demonstrate a range of settings within Therapy Box’s own apps that demonstrate how AAC apps can be adjusted for a range of requirements.

Rebecca Bright

Rebecca Bright

BSpPath MRCSLT regHPC MASLTIP

Rebecca Bright is a speech and language therapist with over 11 years experience in working with adults with neurological communication disabilities. In 2011 Rebecca, a co-founder of TBoxApps, launched Predictable and Scene & Heard, both award winning AAC apps for the iPad. In 2012, TBoxApps have launched Predictable in 5 more languages and on the Android platform. Rebecca regularly presents workshops in Europe on how speech and language therapists and educators can use tablet technology in their practice.

Beginner

AAC | SGD | App

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A Team-Oriented Approach to AAC: Therapist-Driven Insights to Improving Augmentative Communication

For the past two years we have worked with over 50 speech therapists, OTs, AT Specialists and parents discussing the current and future state of AAC. One common theme we kept hearing was that AAC implementations don't succeed as often as they should. This often seems to happen when there's not a strong enough support system around the communicator. Join us for this webinar to learn about team-enabling technology that can lead to more consistent AAC implementations, and how it's implemented in the new CoughDrop AAC app.

Brian Whitmer

Brian Whitmer

Creator, CoughDrop

Brian Whitmer is a software developer and usability expert from Salt Lake City, Utah. He is the father of four children, the oldest of whom has Rett Syndrome. In 2008 he founded and established the educational technology company Instructure (Canvas) with a focus on universal design. For the last two years he has worked with over fifty speech therapists, OTs and AT specialists around the country developing CoughDrop, a new easy to use, cross-platform, team-oriented AAC app, with the goal of improving technology for struggling communicators like his daughter.

Beginner

AAC | SGD | App

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