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Practical Uses of QIAT: Session 1- AT Service Improvement through Collaboration with Families & Advocates

The Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology Services (QIAT) describe the characteristics of high-quality assistive technology services as they are provided in school settings. The eight service areas include: Consideration of AT Needs, Assessment of AT Needs, AT in the IEP, AT Implementation, Evaluation of Effectiveness of AT, AT in Transition, Administrative Support for AT, and AT Professional Development. For more than 15 years the indicators have been used in a variety of ways to assess assistive technology services and guide improvement efforts.

This AbleNet University webinar series will describe practical ways that parents, families and advocates; school districts and; state and regional programs use the QIAT Indicators and resources on behalf of children with disabilities who use assistive technology.
Session 1: Many families of children with disabilities can imagine benefits of technology use for their children. Some are even using technology at home that is not being used at school yet. While IDEA requires the provision of AT for students who need it, it can sometimes be challenging to know how best to advocate for assistive technology devices and services. Parents and guardians are discovering that the QIAT Indicators can be a useful tool. This session will describe ways family members can use the QIAT Indicators for working within school district's procedures to ensure high quality assistive technology services for their children.
Practical Uses of QIAT: Session 1- AT Service Improvement through Collaboration with Families & Advocates Handout

Gayl Bowser

&

Gayl Bowser

M.Ed

Gayl Bowser’s work as an independent consultant focuses on the integration of technology into the educational programs of students with disabilities. Ms. Bowser provides assistive technology consultation, training and technical assistance throughout the United States and internationally. Gayl has co-authored numerous publications about assistive technology services and is a member of the leadership team of the Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology (QIAT) Consortium. She is a member of the faculty for Portland State University and the University of Oregon. You can learn more about Gayl on her blog at http://www.integrateat.com

Kelly Fonner

Kelly Fonner

MS

Kelly is a self-employed consultant and trainer in assistive and educational technology. Since 1986, she has presented to schools, universities & families in 45 states & internationally in Australia, Canada and South Africa. Kelly has been working with individuals with disabilities since the mid 70s and with assistive technologies since 1983. Her teaching experiences have been as a teacher assistant, teacher and instructional media specialist in early childhood, preschool and school age programs. She worked 8 years as a consultant with PennTech, the state-wide technology project supported by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Kelly has a B.S. in special education from Millersville University, an M.S. in educational technology with a minor in special education/rehabilitation technology from The Johns Hopkins University, and holds an Assistive Technology Applications Certificate of Learning from California State University - Northridge.

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Pediatric and School Based AAC Evaluations

When evaluating and treating someone a child with a communication disorder therapist can have a long and tedious process in helping secure a device for a pediatric patient or a school based child. There are several steps involved from the initial evaluation to submitting a device submission report. What tools are available to help us streamline the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan on the report and IEP help the user acclimate to their device?

In this presentation, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for pediatric and/or school based communication device user. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of an AAC evaluation and treatment plan. During the presentation tools and strategies for having the most effective AAC evaluations and device submission reports will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process when working with school based children or pediatric therapy.
Pediatric and School Based AAC Evaluation Handout.

Rachell Westby

Rachell Westby

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachel Westby has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachel has 12 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and have worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. First serving as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioning to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program, which led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association. I am an experienced presenter, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. During the last 2 years, I have presented at the Children’s Hospital AT Symposium, CollaborATe in Richmond, VA as well as a host of support groups, medical clinics, and in-services on the topic of AT/AAC for the ALS patient and/or other eye-gaze users.

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Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations – Session 3

Session 3: Eye Gaze Evaluation and Treatment Plan

When evaluating and treating someone with a communication disorder coupled with severe physical impairments, eye gaze can often be one of the products we as evaluators will need to try. Pediatric and adult eye gaze evaluations are challenging not only because they require knowledge of high tech equipment, but also because of the steps involved from the initial consultation to device submission. Most importantly, for the therapist, it doesn’t end there. What tools are available to help us through the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts of eye gaze report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan help the user acclimate to their device?
In this presentation series, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for eye gaze. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of the eye gaze evaluation and treatment process. During the presentation series resources for having the most effective eye gaze evaluations, report writing skills, and treatment plan after the device arrives will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process whether working with pediatrics or adults.
Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations - Session 3- Handout

Rachell Westby

Rachell Westby

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachel Westby has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachel has 12 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and have worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. First serving as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioning to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program, which led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association. I am an experienced presenter, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. During the last 2 years, I have presented at the Children’s Hospital AT Symposium, CollaborATe in Richmond, VA as well as a host of support groups, medical clinics, and in-services on the topic of AT/AAC for the ALS patient and/or other eye-gaze users.

Beginner

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Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations – Session 2

Session 2: Eye Gaze Evaluation Effective Report Writing (case studies)

When evaluating and treating someone with a communication disorder coupled with severe physical impairments, eye gaze can often be one of the products we as evaluators will need to try. Pediatric and adult eye gaze evaluations are challenging not only because they require knowledge of high tech equipment, but also because of the steps involved from the initial consultation to device submission. Most importantly, for the therapist, it doesn’t end there. What tools are available to help us through the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts of eye gaze report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan help the user acclimate to their device?
In this presentation series, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for eye gaze. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of the eye gaze evaluation and treatment process. During the presentation series resources for having the most effective eye gaze evaluations, report writing skills, and treatment plan after the device arrives will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process whether working with pediatrics or adults.
Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations - Session 2 Handout

Rachell Westby

Rachell Westby

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachel Westby has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachel has 12 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and have worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. First serving as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioning to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program, which led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association. I am an experienced presenter, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. During the last 2 years, I have presented at the Children’s Hospital AT Symposium, CollaborATe in Richmond, VA as well as a host of support groups, medical clinics, and in-services on the topic of AT/AAC for the ALS patient and/or other eye-gaze users.

Beginner

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Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations – Session 1

Session 1: Eye Gaze Evaluation: Tools and Process

When evaluating and treating someone with a communication disorder coupled with severe physical impairments, eye gaze can often be one of the products we as evaluators will need to try. Pediatric and adult eye gaze evaluations are challenging not only because they require knowledge of high tech equipment, but also because of the steps involved from the initial consultation to device submission. Most importantly, for the therapist, it doesn’t end there. What tools are available to help us through the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts of eye gaze report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan help the user acclimate to their device?
In this presentation series, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for eye gaze. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of the eye gaze evaluation and treatment process. During the presentation series resources for having the most effective eye gaze evaluations, report writing skills, and treatment plan after the device arrives will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process whether working with pediatrics or adults.
Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations - Session 1 Handout

Rachell Westby

Rachell Westby

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachel Westby has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachel has 12 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and have worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. First serving as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioning to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program, which led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association. I am an experienced presenter, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016. During the last 2 years, I have presented at the Children’s Hospital AT Symposium, CollaborATe in Richmond, VA as well as a host of support groups, medical clinics, and in-services on the topic of AT/AAC for the ALS patient and/or other eye-gaze users.

Beginner

View Now