Where to start? Examining the Language Organization of Communication Devices and Strategies to Support Their Use – 60 minutes

Where do we start? How do we teach speech generating devices (SGD) to individuals who have exceptional and complex communication needs? This webinar examines the language representation and organization on various SGDs. We will also focus on strategies for working with a wide range of device users: users with language skills at the cause effect level up to those using dynamic communication devices. Join us to discuss symbol representation, vocabulary sets, and use/implementation of various forms of Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Where to start - Examining the Language Organization of Communication Devices and Strategies to Support Their Use Handout

Megan Mussano

Megan Mussano

M.S. CCC-SLP/L, ATP

Megan Mussano M.S. CCC-SLP/L, ATP is a full time Assisstive Technology Coordinator for an Illinois K-12 school district. She has been an Assistive Technology specialist for 6 years with an additional 8 years of experience as a Speech Language Pathologist. She provides professional development at various conferences and is the instructor for an AT course at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Beginner

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Amazing Race – 60 minutes

Staff members from Bluffton-Harrison Elementary will share their "Amazing Race" in implementing various methods of AAC use with their students who have a wide range of abilities and needs. These methods will include no tech, low tech and high tech examples of AAC systems trialed and utilized in the Intense Interventions class. This presentation will also include case studies and practical methods of utilizing AAC in the classroom using communication, collaboration and core vocabulary. Amazing Race Handout

Nicole Wingate

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Nicole Wingate

M.A. CCC-SLP

Nicole is a graduate of Ball State University with a bachelor's of science degree in speech-language pathology and audiology and a master's in speech-language pathology. She has worked in a school setting for 18 years. She is passionate about optimizing her students' communication abilities so that they may become competent communicators. Nicole has co-presented at PATINS, Indiana Principal's Association, Indiana AAC Summit, OCALICON and AAC in the Cloud. Nicole has had guest posts on the AAC Language Lab and PrAACtical AAC.

Angela Sheets

Angela Sheets

Interventions Teacher

Angela is a graduate of Ball State University with a bachelor's degree in special education. She has taught elementary intense interventions for 18 years. She is passionate about designing access for all students to meet their greatest potential. She is also a parent of a child who has cerebral palsy, who is an assistive tech user. Angela has co-presented at PATINS, Indiana Principal's Association, Indiana AAC Summit, and AAC in the Cloud. In addition, she has served two years on the ISTAR Content Review Panel and has had guest posts on the AAC Language Lab and PrAACtical AAC.

Beginner

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Classroom-wide Core Vocabulary Instruction for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities – 60 minutes

This webinar will review an implementation program, called Project Core, aimed at providing classroom professionals with the training, tools and ongoing support needed to deliver classroom-wide communication instruction to students with significant cognitive disabilities. The program specifically targets students who are not yet using speech, sign language or symbols to communicate in flexible ways. The instruction is delivered by teachers, teaching assistants and other classroom staff, and all students have individual access to an augmentative communication system with Universal Core vocabulary. The Universal Core vocabulary consists of 36 highly useful single words that can be used alone or in combination to communicate for a range of purposes on countless topics with a variety of communication partners. Available Universal Core vocabulary formats to support student access through direct pointing, touch, eye gaze selection, and partner-assisted scanning will be discussed, along with an online tool to guide the selection of suitable formats.

Modeling and explicit instruction of the Universal Core vocabulary is incorporated into daily activities and common instructional routines. An overview of available instructional planning guides and self-evaluation and observational checklists will be provided. The development and evaluation of the Project Core implementation program is supported by a Stepping Up Technology Implementation grant from the Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. Preliminary analysis of data from 17 classroom sites will be presented. All training materials, tools and support resources are available from the Project’s website at: www.project-core.com.
Required disclaimer: This presentation was produced under U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Grant No. H327S140017. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the positions or policies of the Department of Education. No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise mentioned in this presentation is intended or should be inferred.
Classroom-wide Core Vocabulary Instruction for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities Handout

Lori Geist

Lori Geist

PhD, CCC-SLP

Lori Geist, PhD, CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor at the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies in the Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Lori is a certified speech-language pathologist with an emphasis in augmentative communication and assistive technology. She has worked in direct service, consultation, and product development related to AAC, language, and literacy intervention for students with complex communication needs. Lori currently serves as the project director for a research initiative called Project Core.

Beginner/Intermediate

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AAC Developing Participation: Part 5: Maximizing Participation

The purpose of Part 5: Maximizing participation is designed for the child to engage in social interactions, to share information, share responsibility, and contribute to conversations with as little adult assistance as possible. The child will continue to expand and mature with language expression and also learn how to regulate interactions such as initiating, repairing a message, staying on topic, or asking permission. The child will demonstrate social skills, use vocabulary to accommodate educational growth, and participate in a variety of life experiences. As in the previous four webinars, tips for activities, literacy, vocabulary, tools, access, and troubleshooting will be offered to support a child becoming independent with communication and social participation.

Sharon M. Rogers

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Sharon M. Rogers

Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Sharon Rogers, Ph.D., CCC-SLP has recently retired as adjunct faculty in Communicative Disorders at California State University Fullerton, where she taught the seminar and practicum in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). She served as assistant professor in special education at Claremont Graduate University. As a speech language pathologist in public schools in California and Kentucky, she found her real passion was in assessing and developing communication of children with complex communication needs. She continues as a consultant with students as they participate using AAC. She published an article “Two Perspectives on Technology for Children with Special Needs” that included viewpoints of both parents and SLPs. Her writing with Mary Poplin has appeared in the Learning Disabilities Quarterly. She is a presenter at CSHA and the International Society of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC) conferences in the United States, Ireland, Denmark and Spain.

Lesley E. Mayne

Lesley E. Mayne

Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Lesley E. Mayne PhD, CCC-SLP is the professor of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) at California State University, Fullerton and has been working in the public school, charter and private settings for 17 years. Lesley participates in special education trans-disciplinary diagnostic and treatment teams, lectures and writes on topics such as AAC, social skills, accommodations and modifications in the mainstream academic setting. She received a district award for Outstanding Achievement at the 2013 California Speech-Language and Hearing Association State Conference, District 7. She is the author of Let’s Talk Social Skills by Speechmark Publications (2008). She published an article titled, “Change of Scenery: Taking Clients and Treatment Plans Outdoors” (Advance, 2000, 10(35), 10-11). Her M.A. degree was completed at California State University, Fullerton in Communicative Disorders and her B.A. degree was completed at the University of Southern California in Communication.

Beginner/Intermediate

SGDs | AAC | Literacy | Vocabulary

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AAC Developing Participation: Part 4: Bridging Skills

The purpose of Part 4: Bridging Skills is designed for the child to bridge into independence with their communication participation. The goal is to continue to expand the child’s unique language productions while adult facilitators learn to reduce cuing in order for the child to experience increased degrees of independent success. Tips will be offered for activities with unfamiliar communication partners, literacy by writing and reflection on their own experiences, vocabulary skills of using correct tense and even slang, testing adequacy of tools, access, and troubleshooting so that the children will be better able to bridge to successful independent participation.

Sharon M. Rogers

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Sharon M. Rogers

Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Sharon Rogers, Ph.D., CCC-SLP has recently retired as adjunct faculty in Communicative Disorders at California State University Fullerton, where she taught the seminar and practicum in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). She served as assistant professor in special education at Claremont Graduate University. As a speech language pathologist in public schools in California and Kentucky, she found her real passion was in assessing and developing communication of children with complex communication needs. She continues as a consultant with students as they participate using AAC. She published an article “Two Perspectives on Technology for Children with Special Needs” that included viewpoints of both parents and SLPs. Her writing with Mary Poplin has appeared in the Learning Disabilities Quarterly. She is a presenter at CSHA and the International Society of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC) conferences in the United States, Ireland, Denmark and Spain.

Lesley E. Mayne

Lesley E. Mayne

Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Lesley E. Mayne PhD, CCC-SLP is the professor of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) at California State University, Fullerton and has been working in the public school, charter and private settings for 17 years. Lesley participates in special education trans-disciplinary diagnostic and treatment teams, lectures and writes on topics such as AAC, social skills, accommodations and modifications in the mainstream academic setting. She received a district award for Outstanding Achievement at the 2013 California Speech-Language and Hearing Association State Conference, District 7. She is the author of Let’s Talk Social Skills by Speechmark Publications (2008). She published an article titled, “Change of Scenery: Taking Clients and Treatment Plans Outdoors” (Advance, 2000, 10(35), 10-11). Her M.A. degree was completed at California State University, Fullerton in Communicative Disorders and her B.A. degree was completed at the University of Southern California in Communication.

Beginner/Intermediate

SGDs | AAC | Vocabulary

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AAC Developing Participation: Part 2: Building Fundamentals

The purpose of Part 2: Building Fundamentals is designed to help the children function with AAC because their communication matters. Children can learn to express their choices about daily preferences and take turns with peers. Their voice will be heard, even if that voice is a LITTLEmack, a BIGmack, or their own voice as they point to a communication board or use a communication switch. Remember that participation matters across contexts so we must continue to build literacy skills, expand language with question asking vocabulary, use more complex AAC tools, access, and troubleshoot for the children who are putting words and ideas together.

Sharon M. Rogers

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Sharon M. Rogers

Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Sharon Rogers, Ph.D., CCC-SLP has recently retired as adjunct faculty in Communicative Disorders at California State University Fullerton, where she taught the seminar and practicum in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). She served as assistant professor in special education at Claremont Graduate University. As a speech language pathologist in public schools in California and Kentucky, she found her real passion was in assessing and developing communication of children with complex communication needs. She continues as a consultant with students as they participate using AAC. She published an article “Two Perspectives on Technology for Children with Special Needs” that included viewpoints of both parents and SLPs. Her writing with Mary Poplin has appeared in the Learning Disabilities Quarterly. She is a presenter at CSHA and the International Society of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC) conferences in the United States, Ireland, Denmark and Spain.

Lesley E. Mayne

Lesley E. Mayne

Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Lesley E. Mayne PhD, CCC-SLP is the professor of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) at California State University, Fullerton and has been working in the public school, charter and private settings for 17 years. Lesley participates in special education trans-disciplinary diagnostic and treatment teams, lectures and writes on topics such as AAC, social skills, accommodations and modifications in the mainstream academic setting. She received a district award for Outstanding Achievement at the 2013 California Speech-Language and Hearing Association State Conference, District 7. She is the author of Let’s Talk Social Skills by Speechmark Publications (2008). She published an article titled, “Change of Scenery: Taking Clients and Treatment Plans Outdoors” (Advance, 2000, 10(35), 10-11). Her M.A. degree was completed at California State University, Fullerton in Communicative Disorders and her B.A. degree was completed at the University of Southern California in Communication.

Beginner/Intermediate

SGDs | AAC | Literacy | Vocabulary

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AAC Developing Participation: Part 1: Getting Started

The purpose of Part 1: Getting Started is designed to help practitioners and parents answer the question, “What am I supposed to do?” Drs. Rogers and Mayne will talk to you about social interaction behaviors that a child with predominantly nonverbal communication skills uses to communicate. Then we will address communication skills and activities to support emerging communication with teachable suggestions for facilitators who gradually become the child’s communication partners. We will discuss development of beginning literacy skills, choosing vocabulary for AAC, selecting different AAC tools, trying various access methods, and finally troubleshooting AAC options for beginning AAC users.

Sharon M. Rogers

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Sharon M. Rogers

Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Sharon Rogers, Ph.D., CCC-SLP has recently retired as adjunct faculty in Communicative Disorders at California State University Fullerton, where she taught the seminar and practicum in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). She served as assistant professor in special education at Claremont Graduate University. As a speech language pathologist in public schools in California and Kentucky, she found her real passion was in assessing and developing communication of children with complex communication needs. She continues as a consultant with students as they participate using AAC. She published an article “Two Perspectives on Technology for Children with Special Needs” that included viewpoints of both parents and SLPs. Her writing with Mary Poplin has appeared in the Learning Disabilities Quarterly. She is a presenter at CSHA and the International Society of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC) conferences in the United States, Ireland, Denmark and Spain.

Lesley E. Mayne

Lesley E. Mayne

Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Lesley E. Mayne PhD, CCC-SLP is the professor of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) at California State University, Fullerton and has been working in the public school, charter and private settings for 17 years. Lesley participates in special education trans-disciplinary diagnostic and treatment teams, lectures and writes on topics such as AAC, social skills, accommodations and modifications in the mainstream academic setting. She received a district award for Outstanding Achievement at the 2013 California Speech-Language and Hearing Association State Conference, District 7. She is the author of Let’s Talk Social Skills by Speechmark Publications (2008). She published an article titled, “Change of Scenery: Taking Clients and Treatment Plans Outdoors” (Advance, 2000, 10(35), 10-11). Her M.A. degree was completed at California State University, Fullerton in Communicative Disorders and her B.A. degree was completed at the University of Southern California in Communication.

Beginner/Intermediate

AAC | SGDs | Literacy | Vocabulary

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