AAC Funding Report Writing – 60 minutes

AAC report writing can seem like a daunting task whether you are writing your first report or have submitted reports in the past. There are several steps involved starting with device trials and moving towards writing a device submission report. What are the do's and don’ts of report writing? What is the language of report writing? How can our treatment plan on the report be used in our therapy plan and/or IEP to help the user acclimate to their device? In this presentation, participants will learn successful report writing tips for AAC device submissions. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of an AAC device funding report and treatment plan. During the presentation tools and strategies for having the most effective report will be discussed and examples demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process when working with any AAC user. AAC Funding Report Writing Handout

Rachell Johnson

Rachell Johnson

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachell Johnson has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachell has 14 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and has worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. I served as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioned to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program as well as a consultant for the MN Technology for Home Grant. This led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association and working as an AT Team Lead for a school district. I enjoy teaching, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference, 6 times from 2013-2018 as well as at a host of other AT symposiums and webinars. Working with eye-gaze users of all ages is just one of my interests and specialty areas under the umbrella of AT.

Beginner

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Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations – Session 3 – 60 minutes

Session 3: Eye Gaze Evaluation and Treatment Plan

When evaluating and treating someone with a communication disorder coupled with severe physical impairments, eye gaze can often be one of the products we as evaluators will need to try. Pediatric and adult eye gaze evaluations are challenging not only because they require knowledge of high tech equipment, but also because of the steps involved from the initial consultation to device submission. Most importantly, for the therapist, it doesn’t end there. What tools are available to help us through the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts of eye gaze report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan help the user acclimate to their device?
In this presentation series, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for eye gaze. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of the eye gaze evaluation and treatment process. During the presentation series resources for having the most effective eye gaze evaluations, report writing skills, and treatment plan after the device arrives will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process whether working with pediatrics or adults.
Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations - Session 3- Handout

Rachell Johnson

Rachell Johnson

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachell Johnson has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachell has 14 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and has worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. I served as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioned to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program as well as a consultant for the MN Technology for Home Grant. This led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association and working as an AT Team Lead for a school district. I enjoy teaching, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference, 6 times from 2013-2018 as well as at a host of other AT symposiums and webinars. Working with eye-gaze users of all ages is just one of my interests and specialty areas under the umbrella of AT.

Beginner

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Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations – Session 2 – 60 minutes

Session 2: Eye Gaze Evaluation Effective Report Writing (case studies)

When evaluating and treating someone with a communication disorder coupled with severe physical impairments, eye gaze can often be one of the products we as evaluators will need to try. Pediatric and adult eye gaze evaluations are challenging not only because they require knowledge of high tech equipment, but also because of the steps involved from the initial consultation to device submission. Most importantly, for the therapist, it doesn’t end there. What tools are available to help us through the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts of eye gaze report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan help the user acclimate to their device?
In this presentation series, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for eye gaze. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of the eye gaze evaluation and treatment process. During the presentation series resources for having the most effective eye gaze evaluations, report writing skills, and treatment plan after the device arrives will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process whether working with pediatrics or adults.
Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations - Session 2 Handout

Rachell Johnson

Rachell Johnson

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachell Johnson has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachell has 14 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and has worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. I served as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioned to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program as well as a consultant for the MN Technology for Home Grant. This led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association and working as an AT Team Lead for a school district. I enjoy teaching, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference, 6 times from 2013-2018 as well as at a host of other AT symposiums and webinars. Working with eye-gaze users of all ages is just one of my interests and specialty areas under the umbrella of AT.

Beginner

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Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations – Session 1 – 60 minutes

Session 1: Eye Gaze Evaluation: Tools and Process

When evaluating and treating someone with a communication disorder coupled with severe physical impairments, eye gaze can often be one of the products we as evaluators will need to try. Pediatric and adult eye gaze evaluations are challenging not only because they require knowledge of high tech equipment, but also because of the steps involved from the initial consultation to device submission. Most importantly, for the therapist, it doesn’t end there. What tools are available to help us through the evaluation process? What are the dos and don’ts of eye gaze report writing when we are completing a device submission report? How can our treatment plan help the user acclimate to their device?
In this presentation series, participants will learn what needs to happen before, during, and after an AAC evaluation for eye gaze. The resources, tools and strategies learned during this presentation can help a therapist during each stage of the eye gaze evaluation and treatment process. During the presentation series resources for having the most effective eye gaze evaluations, report writing skills, and treatment plan after the device arrives will be discussed and demonstrated. These resources can be easily implemented into a clinician’s evaluation process whether working with pediatrics or adults.
Pediatric and Adult Eye Gaze Evaluations - Session 1 Handout

Rachell Johnson

Rachell Johnson

M.C.D., CCC-SLP

Rachell Johnson has a Bachelor’s (BA) in Speech Pathology from Columbia College, Columbia, SC and a Masters in Communication Disorders (MCD) from the University Of South Carolina School Of Public Health.

Rachell has 14 years of experience in the field of speech language pathology and has worked as an expert with assistive technology since 2011. I served as the Pediatric and Adult Neuro AAC Specialist for an outpatient rehabilitation center then transitioned to working with AT and ALS patients with the MN/ND/SD Chapter of the ALS Association's Herbek Sing AT Program as well as a consultant for the MN Technology for Home Grant. This led me to become the AT Program Manager of the DC/MD/VA Chapter of ALS Association and working as an AT Team Lead for a school district. I enjoy teaching, and I have presented at Closing the Gap, a national AT conference, 6 times from 2013-2018 as well as at a host of other AT symposiums and webinars. Working with eye-gaze users of all ages is just one of my interests and specialty areas under the umbrella of AT.

Beginner

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Let’s Look at Chrome: Apps & Extensions for Writing – 30 minutes

With Chromebooks taking over K-12 education, practitioners and educators need to refill their “toolkit” with a whole new set of supports for ALL learners. Using the power of Chrome, we can provide supports for learners not only on Chromebooks, but on ANY computer using the Chrome browser. This fast-paced webinar will introduce an array of Chrome-based apps and extensions focused on providing support for struggling writers. From text to speech to study skills support to word prediction - there is something for every learner.

Let's Look at Chrome: Apps & Extensions for Writing Handout

Mike Marotta

Mike Marotta

RESNA Certified ATP

Mike has been an innovator in the field of assistive technology for over 20-years. Starting as a provider of direct services, he has transitioned to a leadership role within the assistive technology community that has seen him impacting not only service provision, but also systems change activities and pre-service training for new professionals..

Beginner

Chrome | Apps | Extensions | Writing

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The Top 5 iPad Apps for Struggling Readers and Writers

This webinar will present the top 5 apps to help support your struggling student immediately. These apps support access to textbooks, research, and learning materials, including support for reading, writing, and completing homework. You will learn realistic application and implementation to begin using in your classroom today! iPad accessibility features (built-in) will also be discussed.

Diana Petschauer

Diana Petschauer

M. Ed, ATP, CEO

Diana is a RESNA certified Assistive Technology Professional and Founder/ CEO of Assistive Technology for Education, LLC and Access4Employment LLC. Diana is an accessibility specialist and certified ATP who provides AT assessment, training & consultation for students to access education and for adults to access employment, home and the community. Diana manages the AT consultants and trainers who work for ATE and A4E. Previously Diana was the AT Specialist at the University of New Hampshire. She presents and trains locally & nationally, including at ATIA, CSUN, Closing the Gap, & OTAP. AT for Ed and A4E are New England based companies, services are provided nationally, including PD workshops and webinars. See the website at AssistiveTechnologyforEducation.com

Beginner/Intermediate

iPad | Apps | Reading | Writing

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Using Sentence Starters for Early AAC/Writing: Poetry Power

This session will highlight ways to use highly functional sentence starters as predictable charts and poems. Here they are, the top two word sequences for vocabulary use in early writing (Clendon, Sturm, & Cali, 2004): I like, Going to, I am, Went to, To the, I went, In the, It was, My mom, And my. Learn how to structure experiences for students that support and celebrate their earliest writing attempts using poetry forms. These sequences can be embedded in list poems, add-a-word poems, comparison poems, and other poetry frames.

Deanna Wagner

Deanna Wagner

MS/CCC-SLP

Deanna has worked as an Assistive Technology Specialist with both children and adults in Phoenix, AZ, for more than 18 years. She has provided therapy, trainings, and assessments in the area of augmentative communication, with a particular focus on multiply challenged individuals and services to Spanish-speaking families. As a trainer on the Assistive Technology Training Project, through the Arizona Department of Education, she has provided trainings and technical assistance to school personnel across a broad range of assistive technology devices and strategies. She has presented at local, national, and international conferences.

Beginner

SGDs | AAC | Writing

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AT for Common Core College and Career Readiness for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities Part 2: Fluency in Reading, Writing and Math

Opportunities for learning academic content is essential for students with significant cognitive disabilities. Functional skills can be taught as part of any academic lesson. This workshop will explore instructional and access strategies for literacy, math and science concepts for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Tana Donaghy

Tana Donaghy

Ed. D.

Meet Tana Donaghy, Tana is the President and Founder of Educational Equity For All, and has worked with students with Moderate to Severe and Profound Disabilities for over 18 years. She has been a classroom teacher and Senior Program Specialist. She has trained teachers, paraeducators, administrators and parents across the nation on how to improve instructional practices for this student population. She has a multiple subject general education credential as well as an educational specialist credential. She is currently completing her Ed.D in Education focusing on standards based instruction for students with profound multiple disabilities who are functioning below 24 months. She has served on state organizations developing and training on programming and curriculum and instruction for students with mild to severe disabilities from birth to 22 years of age.

Beginner/Intermediate

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