all-turn-it spinner

  1. Better Breakfast Month

    Better Breakfast Month

    Did you know that Better Breakfast Month is celebrated in September? We’ve created a Remarkable Idea to help you celebrate!

    In this Remarkable Idea we’ll show you how to integrate assistive technology to make a smoothie.

    • create an accessible learning environment
    • enable students to show what they’ve learned
    • create a yummy fruit smoothie

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | quicktalker 7 | powerlink 4 | italk2 with levels | following directions | choice making | candy corn | bigmack | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  2. Bits and Pieces

    Bits and Pieces

    In this Remarkable Idea, students decipher clues and respond with answers as they prepare for an upcoming test.

    This activity addresses:

    • Study skills
    • Turn taking
    • Critical thinking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Write the names of key people, events, or theories to be studied on the blank side of the large All-Turn-It Spinner overlay.
    2. Write a clue or question pertaining to each of the overlay entries on a sticky note; then cover each item written on the overlay with the note.
    3. Record the answers on the QuickTalker 12 or iPad with SoundingBoard app. You can record more than one answer per question.
    4. Create your symbols.


    What to do:

    1. A student can activate the All-Turn-It Spinner with the Jelly Bean switch to randomly choose a clue or question.
    2. When the All-Turn-It Spinner stops, read the clue written on the sticky note. The student then identifies the item he or she thinks it pertains to using the QuickTalker 12 or iPad with SoundingBoard app to reveal the answer.
    3. Students take turns reading clues and providing correct answers.
    4. When a clue is chosen a second time, students can add new information to what has already been revealed and take another spin.


    Additional suggestions:

    Use this activity for independent or small group study activities.
    Use a team format, dividing the class into two groups for friendly competition. Assign a number to each team and write the numbers on the small, blank overlay. Randomly select the group to respond with a spin of the All-Turn-It Spinner.

    Keywords

    turn taking | study skills | quicktalker 12 | jelly bean switch | critical thinking | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  3. 100th Day of School

    In this Remarkable Idea, explore the number 100 and improve students’ number sense. The hundredth day of school is an exciting opportunity for students to explore the number 100 through activities, discussions, and art projects allowing students to gain a better understanding of what the number 100 means to them.

    This activity addresses:

    • Social skills
    • Choice making
    • Cause and effect
    • Fine motor skills
    • Number sense
    • Creative thinking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Using cups, bowls, mason jars, or some other container students can see through, make pairs of 100 and non-100 items such as pennies, cotton balls, or small candies.
    2. Count and separate a set of 100 mini pretzel sticks for each student in class.
    3. Using a hot glue gun, glue 100 crayons to the top of the canvas side by side.
    4. Using school glue, write the number 100 in bubble letters on the middle of the canvas. Make sure you use a thick bead of glue to prevent wax from entering the 100 later on.

    What to do:

    Counting to 100
    1. Begin by counting 100 days with your students. Explain that there are different ways we can count.
    - Give each student a blank ten frame and allow them to fill in each box by coloring, using stickers, or a bingo dotter. Use the ten frames to model counting to 100 by tens. A Step-by-Step can be used to assist with counting by tens.
    - Ask student’s how many fingers they have, and how many students they would need to get to 100. Include toes to get students thinking about other ways to make 100.
    - Using the coins, ask students how many nickels, dimes, or quarters you would need to make $1.00. Model counting by each. A Step-by-Step can be used to assist with counting.

    Thinking about 100
    1. Using a blank All-Turn-It Spinner overlay, write talking points such as eat, walk, hold, do, etc.
    - Use a Jelly Bean switch to activate the All-Turn-It Spinner and when it lands on a category ask students to think about something they could eat 100 of, or how far 100 steps would get them, etc. This could be modified by using an iTalk2 with Levels and giving students a choice between two things (ex. Could you eat 100: Cheeseburgers or jelly beans.)
    2. Using a blank All-Turn-It Spinner overlay, write more than/less than talking points such as “When it rains do you think there are more than 100 or less than 100 rain drops?”, “At the Super Bowl are there more than 100 or less than 100 fans in the stadium?”, or “Are there more than 100 or less than 100 keys on the computer keyboards in our school?”
    - Use a Jelly Bean switch to activate the All-Turn-It Spinner and when it lands on a scenario ask students to decide whether it’s more than 100 or less than 100.
    3. Present the previously made sets of 100 and non-100 items to students and ask them to guess which container is the one with 100 in it. Use an iTalk2 with Levels to let students decide which container has 100. (record “This one has 100.” and “This one has less than 100.” on each side of the iTalk2 with Levels)

    Fun with 100
    1. Give each student a set of 100 pretzel sticks and allow them to create anything they can with the pretzel sticks.
    - Allow students the opportunity to explore the many different images they can create.
    2. Place your canvas in a vertical position (on a stand or have an adult hold it) with the crayons at the top.
    3. Connect a hair dryer to the PowerLink 4, and connect a Jelly Bean switch to it. Allow students to take turns melting the crayons on the top of the canvas.
    4. As the crayon wax melts, it should stay on the outside of the 100 leaving you with a one of a kind piece of art for your classroom made by your students.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social skills | powerlink 4 | numbers | jelly bean switch | italk2 with levels | fine motor skills | creative thinking | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  4. Elementary, My Dear Watson

    Elementary, My Dear Watson

    In this Remarkable Idea, students test their knowledge of chemical symbols by identifying the name of the element, its molecular weight, and its location on the periodic chart.

    This activity addresses:

    • Science
    • Chemistry
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Write the chemical symbols to be reviewed on the blank side of the large overlay for the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    2. Divide the blank side of the small All-Turn-It Spinner overlay into three sections and label them element, molecular weight, and location on periodic chart.
    3. Create an overlay for the QuickTalker for each chemical symbol. 4. Record each chemicals description on the QuickTalker.

    What to do:

    1. Have students take turns activating the All-Turn-It Spinner using the switch.
    2. Students can use the QuickTalker to discuss the chemicals.
    3. Students can find the chemical on the periodic chart.
    4. Take turns until all chemical symbols have been reviewed.

    Keywords

    switches | science | quicktalker | chemistry | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  5. Pumpkin is a Fruit?

    Pumpkin is a Fruit?

    During the month of October, we use pumpkins for decorations, but what else can we do with pumpkins? In this Remarkable Idea, students learn that a pumpkin is more than just a decoration, it’s a fruit!

    This activity addresses:

    • Plant science
    • Social skills
    • Choice making
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Cookies

    • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
    • 1/2 cup butter (1 stick), softened
    • 1 cup canned pumpkin
    • 1 large egg
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    Glaze

    • 2 cups powdered sugar
    • 3 tablespoons milk
    • 1 tablespoon melted butter
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • Orange food coloring

    Preparation:

    1. Record fruit facts to a Step-by-Step.
    2. Record each definition to the TalkingBrix 2.
    3. Find pictures or play food of fruits and vegetables (common ones and others discussed in this activity)
    4. Attach the fruit and vegetable pictures or manipulatives to the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    5. Preheat oven to 350°

    [su_heading class="small"]What to do:[/su_heading]
    1. Begin by designating a “Word Whiz” to define the vocabulary words.
    2. Introduce the vocabulary words for this activity “fruit” and “vegetable”.
    3. Allow students to take turns activating the Step-by-Step to share the “Fruit Facts” with their classmates.
    4. Tell the class that today you are going to make cookies with a fruit: pumpkin.
    5. Make the cookies, allow students to assist with mixing using the PowerLink 4 and Jelly Bean switch connected to the electric mixer.
    6. Grease the baking sheet.
    7. Combine flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt in a bowl.
    8. Beat sugar and butter in mixer bowl until well blended.
    9. Beat in pumpkin, egg and vanilla extract until smooth. Slowly beat in flour mixture.
    10. Place onto a cookie sheet.
    11. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes or until edges begin to firm.
    12. Allow to cool before drizzling glaze over the top.
    13. To make glaze combine powdered sugar, milk, melted butter, vanilla extract, orange food coloring.
    14. Split the class into teams and allow each team turns to activate the All-Turn-It Spinner. When it lands on a fruit or vegetable that team must answer the question, “Is it a fruit or a vegetable?” If they have trouble you can give them a hint. Example hints: “This part of the plant has seeds.” “This is the leafy part of the plant.”
    15. If keeping score award 2 points for a correct answer, 1 point for a correct answer after a hint has been given.
    16. Take the cookies out of the oven to cool. Once cooled place a sheet of wax paper on a table with a cookie at the center. Put some glaze on a large spoon and allow students to drizzle it over the cookies.

    Script:

    “A fruit is the part of the plant that contains the seeds.”
    “A vegetable is the parts of the plant that do not contain the seeds such as the stem, leaves, roots, and flower buds.”
    “Common fruits are apples, bananas, oranges, and grapes.”
    “Did you know that avocados, beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, and pumpkins are also fruits.”
    “Common vegetables are lettuce, carrots, broccoli, and beets.”

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social skills | plant science | jelly bean switch | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  6. Eating Healthy Foods for a Healthy Lifestyle

    Eating Healthy Foods for a Healthy Lifestyle

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about food groups, empty calories, and some yummy healthy snacks.

    Note: Always be aware of allergies before serving food to your students

    This activity addresses:

    • Health
    • Cause and effect
    • Critical thinking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Smoothie Ingredients

    • Juice (100% fruit, no added sugar)
    • Plain Greek yogurt (no added sugar, and the main ingredients should be milk and live active cultures)
    • Vegetable (Kale or spinach work well)

    Preparation:

    1. Write each of the five food groups (Vegetables, Fruits, Grains, Dairy, Protein) on the All-Turn-It Spinner overlay.
    2. Record at least 2 examples of each food group to the SLITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels. (example: Cereal, toast, strawberries, blueberries, celery, broccoli, chicken, nuts, yogurt, milk)

    What to do:

    Intro:
    Discuss the five major food groups using the real life examples (ex: toy fruits and vegetables, canned fruits and vegetables, cereal boxes, pictures of a gallon of milk, yogurt, etc.). These should be familiar items for your students.

    Ask students for examples of each food groups. Use the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels so all students can participate in the discussion.

    Hands On
    Using the All-Turn-It Spinner and Jelly Bean, have students take turns spinning and giving examples from the group you land on.

    Use the materials you collected for your discussion or have students use the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels.

    Expanded Discussion
    Some students may have given examples of foods earlier in the lesson that do not fit into the five major categories. Discuss fats and oils, as well as empty calories with them.

    Putting this knowledge into practice
    Give examples of some healthy snacks that your students could try at home then make smoothies with them.

    As you add each item to the blender, ask the class which food group that item belongs to. Use the PowerLink 4 to operate the blender.

    Smoothie
    ½-cup yogurt
    1-cup fruit
    ¼-cup juice
    ½-cup vegetable

    Discuss which food groups are missing. (This discussion could be tricky because the yogurt could fit the criteria for two food groups.)

    Enjoy!

    Script:

    Empty calories are foods that don’t provide our bodies with very many nutrients. Some examples of things we might eat or drink that are empty calories are (Soda, candy, cookies, cake, etc.)

    Vocabulary:

    Dairy
    Grain
    Vegetable
    Fruit
    Protein
    Fats & oils
    Empty calories

    Additional suggestions:

    Additional healthy snacks you could use instead of the smoothies:
    Peanut butter and apples
    Low-fat cheese and salt-free pretzel sticks (push the pretzel sticks into cubes of cheese like toothpicks and serve as an Hors D’oeuvre)
    Ants on a log (Celery sticks with peanut butter spread inside, topped with raisins)

    An alternative for the intro activity would be to record the five food groups to TalkingBrix 2 and have students attempt to place the correct TalkingBrix 2 with each food example. You could add a level of difficulty by not telling them which ones are right or wrong and simply telling them they have __ out of 5 correct, they then try to fix their mistakes.

    More information, as well as diet plans for people of all shapes and sizes can be found at http://www.choosemyplate.gov/

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | health | critical thinking | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  7. St. Patrick's Day Fun

    St. Patrick's Day Fun

    In this Remarkable Idea, students celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with food, games, and even build a trap to try and catch that pesky leprechaun!

    This activity addresses:

  8. Creative thinking
  9. Listening skills
  10. Fine motor skills
  11. Number recognition
  12. Patterning
  13. Alternative methods of access

  14. What you need:

    Leprechaun Math

    • Numbers/attribute blocks/etc.
    • All-Turn-It Spinner
    • Jelly Bean switch
    • Leprechaun figures/chocolate gold coins
    • Rice
    • Vinegar
    • Green food coloring
    • Locking plastic bags
    • Lucky Charms cereal

    Mischievous Leprechaun

    • Green glitter/St. Patrick’s Day confetti
    • Small jars/plastic bags
    • Green jelly beans
    • Green washable paint
    • Tape
    • Small shoes
    • Caution tape/police tape
    • Blue2 Blootooth switch

    Trap a Leprechaun

    • Box
    • Green paper for wrapping box
    • Pencil
    • String
    • Leprechaun bait (gold coins, green items, etc.)

    St. Patrick’s Day Bingo

    Preparation:

    Mischievous Leprechaun
    1. Leave trails of glitter or confetti around your classroom.
    2. Make small messes and rearrange things, and leave green shoe prints all over the classroom.
    3. Place jelly beans in small bags or jars and label them as “Leprechaun poop”.
    4. You could also place caution tape at the doorway of the classroom and create a fake police report for students to fill out together.

    Be creative so your students really feel as though a Leprechaun has messed up their room!

    Leprechaun Math
    1. Dye your rice green by combining a ratio of 1-cup of rice to 1-tablespoon of vinegar, along with as much food coloring as you need to get to the desired color in a plastic bag. Allow the rice to dry once it has adsorbed the green color.
    2. Place objects (numbers, attribute blocks, etc.) into the green rice bucket.
    3. Using an All-Turn-It Spinner blank overlay, write (or place pictures) of the objects you wish for your students to find in the rice.
    4. Add Leprechaun figures or chocolate gold coins as a surprise for your students.

    St. Patrick’s Day Bingo
    1. Find/create a St. Patrick’s Day bingo card.
    2. Record each bingo space to a Step-by-Step.

    What to do:

    Mischievous Leprechaun
    1. When your students come into the classroom in the morning, allow them to explore the classroom and see the mischief the Leprechaun has caused.
    2. Allow students to take “crime scene photos” using a Blue2 Blootooth switch and an iPad.
    3. Search for clues and make a list of anyone whose desk or locker was messed with.
    4. File a “police report” with your students. Ask them to describe things they found in the classroom. If your school has a security guard, see if they can assist with this activity.

    Leprechaun Math
    1. Identifying numbers/shapes/etc.: Allow students to take turns spinning the All-Turn-It Spinner and finding the correct number/object in the rice.
    2. Patterns: Pass out Lucky Charms marshmallows to each student (you may wish to only use two or three different shapes). Make an A/B pattern and challenge your students to match the pattern. For advanced students. challenge them to create their own patterns or match more complex patterns.

    St. Patrick’s Day Bingo
    1. Pass out a bingo card to each student.
    2. Select a caller to activate the Step-by-Step.
    3. Play until you have a winner. (Chocolate gold coins make a good prize)

    Trap a Leprechaun
    1. Allow students to decorate the box as well as place drawings around the area you plan to place the trap.
    2. Tie the “Leprechaun bait” to the pencil and use it to prop the box up.
    3. After the students have gone home for the day, remove the bait and replace it with a note that says “Better luck next year!”
    4. Leave the trap in “tripped” condition.

Keywords

step-by-step | patterns | numbers | listening skills | jelly bean switch | fine motor skills | creative thinking | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Word Game

    Word Game

    In this Remarkable Idea, students take a spin on the classic word game by adding an assistive technology component and themes.

    This activity addresses:

    • Spelling
    • Social skills
    • Choice making
    • Cause and effect
    • Fine motor skills
    • Good sportsmanship
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Decide on your theme (decorate a pumpkin, feathers on a turkey, build a snowman, etc.) and the pieces needed (example: pumpkin - nose, mouth, eyes, stem, leaves, etc.)
    2. Record the words you plan to use on your selected communication device (example words: pumpkin, witch, bat, Halloween, etc.)
    3. Write the words you plan to use on strips of construction paper; they should be large enough to read from across the room.

    What to do:

    1. Explain the rules of the Word Game so everyone knows how to play.
    - When it is your turn, you get to guess a letter for the puzzle.
    - If you are right, the letter gets added to the word. If you are wrong, the letter is written off to the side and a piece of the character is added.
    2. Each student takes a turn spinning the All-Turn-It Spinner. If it lands on a letter that has already been guessed, the student will spin again.
    3. After a student has taken their turn, they can take a guess at what the word is using the SuperTalker FT / QuickTalker / iPad with SoundingBoard or the strips of paper on the board.
    4. Once the word is solved, begin again until all words are complete.

    Keywords

    supertalker ft | sportsmanship | spelling | soundingboard app | social skills | quicktalker | jelly bean switch | fine motor skills | choice making | cause and effect | blue2 bluetooth switch | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Building a Snowman

    Building a Snowman

    In this Remarkable Idea, students work together as they take turns stapling together three sets of circles to make a snowman.

    This activity addresses:

    • Following directions
    • Turn taking
    • Sharing materials
    • Fine motor skills
    • Counting
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Cut three pairs of large circles out of white butcher paper. Each set of two paper circles should be several inches larger in diameter than the previous circle set. Paper clip each set of circles together.
    2. Cut out decorations for the snowman, such as hat, eyes, mouth, nose, pipe, button, broom, arms, etc. For each snowman decoration, create a matching symbol. These pictures/symbols should be approximately two inches in size, able to fit on the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    3. Divide the blank side of the All-Turn-It Spinner overlay into six sections and write a number 1-6 in each section.

    What to do:

    1. Read the snowman book to the students and explain what a snowman is and that they are going to make a giant snowman out of paper! Tell students that snowmen are round, and that they are going to make their snowman round, too!
    2. Students work to staple together the pairs of white circles, to be stuffed with paper snowballs. One student moves the paper or stapler, and the other student activates the Jelly/Big Beamer switch to staple the paper.
    3. Give students sheets of scrap white paper and shown how to crumple up each sheet to create a paper “snowball.” Students make paper snowballs until they have each made several.
    4. Students take turns spinning for a number, counting out that many paper snowballs, and placing them in the large paper circles, stuffing the snowman until each of the three sets of circles is full! Use the switch-adapted stapler to staple each of them shut.
    5. Place the snowman decoration pictures/symbols on the large overlay of the All-Turn-It Spinner, and put out the snowman decorations. Students take turns spinning for a snowman decoration picture/symbol, identifies the matching snowman decoration, and glues it on the snowman in the appropriate place.
    6. When the snowman is completed, the teacher and students put it on display.

    Keywords

    switches | sharing | math | jelly beamer | following directions | fine motor skills | big beamer | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Mystery Key

    Mystery Key

    In this Remarkable Idea, switch tops are used as a hiding place. It’s a game for at least three players. The game can be adapted to support a wide range of curriculum goals from object permanence to social skills.

    This activity addresses:

    • Social skills
    • Visual follows
    • Cause and effect
    • Anticipation
    • Group working
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record the messages on the SuperTalker FT to correspond to this Mystery Key SuperTalker Overlay".

    • Location 1: “I’ve lost my key.”
    • Location 2: “Look under the big red one!”
    • Location 3: “What about the small green one?”
    • Location 4: “Check the big yellow one!”
    • Location 5: “Where can it be?”
    • Location 6: “Is it under the tiny yellow one?”
    • Location 7: “Maybe the big blue one?”
    • Location 8: “Take a peek under the small red one!

    2. Attach student/player pictures to the All-Turn-It Spinner using Velcro dots.

    What to do:

    1. In this game, the players work together to find a missing key which has been hidden under one of the switch tops.
    2. Use the All-Turn-It Spinner and the Jelly Beamerto decide who hides the key first. While all the others look away this person hides the key under one of the switch tops. Then he calls to the other players: “I’ve lost my key. Where can it be?”
    3. Use the All-Turn-It Spinner and the Jelly Beamer once more to decide who may guess first. The SuperTalker FT might be used by just one or all the players to do the guessing (e.g. “Look under the big yellow one!”). Each player has just one guess. And the player who finds the key is the next key hider.
    4. Variation to simplify the game: The guessed switch tops can either remain in the game or are taken off the table.
    5. Variation to support more complex goals: A different letter might be hidden under each switch top. So in the course of the game letters for a particular word must be collected in the correct order.

    Keywords

    visual cues | team work | supertalker ft | jelly beamer | cause and effect | bigmack | anticipation | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Food Groups Categorizing Activity

    Food Groups Categorizing Activity

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about or review the food groups, and the types of foods that fit into each group. Students cut out pictures of foods from magazines, then select the food group that the food fits in. Students glue the food picture on a poster labeled with the corresponding food group name and/or picture/symbol.

    This activity addresses:

    • Turn taking
    • Fine motor skills
    • Health
    • Language arts
    • Food and nutrition
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Prepare the following food group pictures/symbols:

    • Protein
    • Dairy
    • Fruit
    • Vegetables
    • Grains

    2. On the top of each large sheet of construction paper, write the name of one of the five food groups. Add a matching picture/symbol of the food group if your students need picture/symbol support.
    3. Using the QuickTalker 7, create an overlay with the five food group pictures/symbols, and record the names of each of the food groups into each message location.

    What to do:

    1. Show students each of the food group pictures/symbols, and students give examples of food from that category.
    2. Students use battery-operated scissors to cut out pictures of different kinds of food, from magazines and newspapers.
    3. Place an assortment of the food pictures on the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    4. Students take turns spinning for a food picture. The teacher immediately programs the name of the food item into a BIGmack. The student uses the BIGmack to tell the others the name of the food item.
    5. The student selects the food group the item belongs in by activating a message location on a QuickTalker 7. When the correct food group is selected, the student identifies the construction paper with the matching food group word/picture symbol and glues the food picture on that sheet.

    Keywords

    quicktalker 7 | language arts | health | food and nutrition | bigmack | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Who was Martin Luther King, Jr.?

    Who was Martin Luther King, Jr.?

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about the life of the man who changed our nation, Martin Luther King, Jr., and how his ideologies are still relevant in the classroom, school, and community today.

    This activity addresses:

    • Choice making
    • Social skills
    • Cause and effect
    • History
    • Vocabulary
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Write the definitions for the vocabulary words on a large piece of paper / whiteboard / chalkboard.
    2. Create vocabulary cards for the terms: equality, leadership, selflessness, hope, and community, with symbols and words sized for the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    3. Create your symbols.
    4. Create a vocabulary board on SoundingBoard with examples of how they can apply to your community.
    5. Record each fact on the Step-by-Step:
    “Martin Luther King, Jr. was a civil rights leader, which means he promoted equal rights and treatment among all people.”
    “Some words that are associated with Dr. King are: equality, leadership, selflessness, hope, and community.”
    6. Record definitions for “timeline” and “boycott” onto TalkingBrix 2.

    What to do:

    1. Begin by introducing Dr. King and allow the students to activate the Step-by-Step to share information about Dr. King.
    2. Place the vocabulary cards on the All-Turn-It Spinner and have the iPad with SoundingBoard ready.
    3. Allow students to take turns spinning the All-Turn-It Spinner. When a student lands on a vocabulary card, remove it from the All-Turn-It Spinner and have them find the definition either on the board (if they can read) or on the SoundingBoard app. Attach the vocabulary word next to the correct definition on the board. Continue until all definitions are complete.
    4. Select a student to be the “Word Whiz” to activate the TalkingBrix 2 for the two remaining vocabulary words: timeline and boycott.
    5. Introduce and discuss the timeline of Dr. King’s life. Have your “Word Whiz” give the definition of “timeline.” Draw the timeline on the board so students have a visual representation.
    6. When you have finished the timeline, ask students how they feel they can apply Dr. King’s teachings in their community. If students are having a difficult time coming up with examples, allow them to use the SoundingBoard app with the examples you choose.

    Script:

    “Martin Luther King, Jr. was a civil rights leader, which means he promoted equal rights and treatment
    among all people.”
    “Some words that are associated with Dr. King are: Equality, leadership, selflessness, hope, and
    community.”

    Vocabulary:

    Equality: The quality or fact of being equal. The same.
    Leadership: Leading or being in charge. A guide.
    Selflessness: Devoted to the well-being of others.
    Hope: A belief that things will turn out for the best.
    Community: A group of people sharing common characteristics, interests, or leading a common life.
    Timeline: A series of connected events.
    Boycott: To avoid buying from or using a service.

    Additional suggestions:

    To help set the tone, use background music from the era or protest/freedom songs. Use Google to find a list of U.S. freedom songs/protest songs.
    Portions of Dr. King’s speeches are available online if you wish to share these with your students.

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. timeline:

    Timeline of Dr. King’s life is provided. You may wish to add, modify, or remove facts from the timeline for your students.
    January 15, 1929: Michael King, later known as Martin Luther King, Jr., is born in Atlanta, Georgia.
    September 20, 1944: King begins his freshman year at Morehouse College in Atlanta.
    August 6, 1946: The Atlanta Constitution publishes King’s letter to the editor stating that black people “are entitled to the basic rights and opportunities of American citizens.”
    February 25, 1948: King is ordained and appointed Assistant Pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta.
    June 8, 1948: King receives his Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology from Morehouse College.
    September 14, 1948: King begins his studies at Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania.
    May, 1951: King graduates from Crozer with a Bachelor of Divinity degree, delivering the valedictory address at commencement.
    September 13, 1951: King begins his graduate studies in Systematic Theology at Boston University.
    June 18, 1953: King and Coretta Scott are married in Marion, Alabama.
    September 1, 1954: King begins his pastorate in Montgomery, Alabama.
    June 5, 1955: King is awarded his doctorate in Systematic Theology from Boston University.
    November 17, 1955: Yolanda Denise King, the Kings’ first child, is born.
    December 1, 1955: Rosa Parks is arrested for refusing to vacate her seat and move to the rear of a city bus in Montgomery, AL to make way for a white passenger. Jo Ann Robinson and other Women’s Political Council members mimeograph thousands of leaflets calling for a one-day boycott of the city’s buses on December 5.
    November 13, 1956: The U.S. Supreme Court affirms the lower court opinion in declaring Alabama bus segregation laws unconstitutional.
    December 21, 1956: Montgomery City Lines resumes full service on all routes. King is among the first passengers to ride the buses.
    February 18, 1957: King appears on the cover of Time magazine.
    May 17, 1957: At the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., King delivers his first national address, “Give Us The Ballot.”
    October 23, 1957: Coretta King gives birth to their second child, Martin, III.
    September 17, 1958: King’s first book Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story is published.
    September 20, 1958: During a book signing in Harlem, New York, King is stabbed and rushed to Harlem Hospital.
    October 19, 1960: King is arrested during a sit-in demonstration at Rich’s department store in Atlanta. He is released on October 27.
    January 31, 1961: Dexter Scott, King’s third child, is born.
    July 27, 1962: King is arrested at an Albany, Georgia prayer vigil and jailed. After spending two weeks in jail, King is released.
    September 28, 1962: During the closing of a conference in Birmingham, AL, a man assaults King, striking him twice in the face.
    March 28, 1963: Bernice Albertine, King’s fourth child, is born.
    April 16, 1963: Responding to advice that African Americans wait patiently for justice, King pens his “Letter from Birmingham Jail.”
    June, 1963: Strength to Love, King’s book of sermons, is published.
    August 28, 1963: King delivers his “I Have a Dream” speech.
    January 3, 1964: King is named “Man of the Year” by Time Magazine.
    June, 1964: King’s book Why We Can’t Wait is published.
    June 11, 1964: King is arrested and jailed for demanding service at a white-only restaurant in St. Augustine, FL.
    December 10, 1964: King receives the Nobel Peace Prize at a ceremony in Oslo, Norway. He declares that “every penny” of the $54,000 award will be used in the ongoing civil rights struggle.
    June, 1967: King’s book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? is published.
    April 3, 1968: In Memphis, TN, King delivers his final speech, “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop.”
    April 4, 1968: King is shot and killed while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis.
    April 9, 1968: King is buried in Atlanta, GA.

    Keywords

    vocabulary | talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | soundingboard app | social skills | history | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Getting To Know Each Other

    Getting To Know Each Other

    In this Remarkable Idea, each student is given the opportunity to tell their classmates and teacher interesting facts about themselves.

    This activity addresses:

    • Turn taking
    • Social skills
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Send home a pre-made student interest inventory sheet for students and parent(s)/guardian(s) to fill out and return to school. Include three to five questions on the student interest inventory sheet. Here are some sample questions:

    • What is your favorite activity?
    • What is your favorite food?
    • What is one thing you did over the summer?

    2. With the student interest inventory sheet, send home one piece of construction paper labeled with their name. The student and parent(s)/guardian(s) will write the answers to the student interest inventory sheet questions on the construction paper, and then decorate the construction paper with pictures representing those answers. The student will bring this completed work back to school.

    What to do:

    1. Start by explaining to the class what you are going to do. A common script would be, “Today we are going to learn a little bit about each other. We are going to take turns using the All-Turn-It Spinner and answering questions about ourselves. I think you will find some of your classmates are interested in some of the same things you are.”
    2. Place each student’s name or picture on the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    3. Teacher selects a student to spin the All-Turn-It Spinner. For students that are unable to activate the All-Turn-It Spinner a wired or wireless switch can be used as an alternative method of activation. When the All-Turn-It Spinner stops, the student it lands on is the student that gets to share their student interest inventory responses. For students needing assistance with speech, pre-record their responses to a Step-by-Step, which they can then use to communicate with their classmates.
    4. Once a student has taken their turn, remove their name or photo from the All-Turn-It Spinner. Repeat steps two and three until each student has had a chance to participate.

    Extensions:

    1. Teachers can help build student relationships by pointing out which students have similar interests, and promote learning from each other by designating class experts.
    2. Older classrooms can graph their results and determine class favorites.
    3. To extend the activity into a week-long event, the teacher can write the responses from each student’s interest survey onto note cards and place them on the All-Turn-It Spinner; the name of the student it belongs to should be on the back. Each day a student will take a turn activating the All-Turn-It Spinner to select a note card. The student will look at their classmates posters to try and figure out who the note card belongs to. The student will guess who the note card belongs to. For students needing assistance with speech a Step-by-Step can be recorded with the script, “I think you are the owner of this note card”. The student would place the Step-by-Step in front of the student they think the note card belongs to and activate it. If they are correct everyone cheers and if they are wrong they try again.

    Keywords

    turn taking | step-by-step | social skills | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Pumpkin Patch

    Pumpkin Patch

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about pumpkin patches and carve their own pumpkin.

    This activity addresses:

    • Choice making
    • Social skills
    • Cause and effect
    • Fine motor skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Carving materials

    Decorating Materials

    • Paint
    • Glitter
    • Other miscellaneous art supplies
    • Black self adhesive vinyl
    • Die cut
    • Battery operated scissors

    Preparation:

    1. Choose pumpkins suitable for your students.
    2. Create the “Pumpkin Patch.” This can be a section of the classroom, outside in the grass, or if you’re using mini pumpkins, a large box filled with leaves, shredded paper, etc.

    What to do:

    1. Allow students to choose their own pumpkin from the “Pumpkin Patch.”
    2. Hollow out each pumpkin.

    • Using a knife, an adult will start begin by cutting the top of the pumpkin. Once there is enough room, remove the knife and replace it with the electric carving knife.
    • An adult will plug the electric carving knife into the PowerLink 4 as well as a Jelly Bean switch.
    • Students activate the switch to turn the electric knife on while an adult guides the knife.
    • Once the top is cut off, clean out the inside using a spoon or your hands. Allow students to each take a turn pulling the insides out of the pumpkin.
    • Dispose of insides (if you plan on toasting the seeds, set them aside).

    3. Allow students to choose the shapes (circle, square, triangle, rectangle, oval, star, or rhombus) of the eyes, nose, and mouth for their pumpkin using a SuperTalker FT or have students randomly choose shapes for their pumpkins using an All-Turn-It Spinner and a Jelly Bean switch.
    4. If carving pumpkins, guide electric knife while the students activate the Jelly Bean Switch for the a href="https://www.ablenetinc.com/powerlink-4-north-america" target="_blank">PowerLink 4 (save the pieces you cut out for later). If using self-adhesive vinyl, assist students with the battery operated scissors (a die cut can also be used to cut more complex shapes) to cut out the shape of their choice (save the scrap paper for later).
    5. Once the pumpkins have been “carved” allow students to use the paint, glitter, and other art supplies to finish decorating their pumpkins.
    6. Once all students have finished decorating their pumpkins use the pieces you cut out of the pumpkin or the scraps of vinyl and challenge students to find the match for each shape.

    Keywords

    supertalker ft | social skills | powerlink 4 | jelly bean switch | fine motor skills | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • The Science of Color

    The Science of Color

    In this Remarkable Idea students will learn about and use the Scientific Method to conduct an experiment involving colors.

    This activity addresses:

    • Choice making
    • Social skills
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    Dye water with the red, blue, and yellow food coloring, place into ice cube trays, and freeze. At least four of each color will be needed.
    Write your vocabulary words in a place where all students can see them.
    Record definitions of “hypothesis” and “conclusion” to TalkingBrix 2.
    Record the colors purple, green, and orange onto the Step-by-Step.
    Record the steps of the scientific method onto a Step-by-Step.
    - Ask a question
    - Construct a hypothesis
    - Test with an experiment
    - Analyze data and draw a conclusion
    - Communicate the results

    After the vocabulary definitions are no longer needed, record “correct” and “incorrect” to the TalkingBrix 2 so students can share their results.

    What to do:

    1. Have a student activate the a Step-by-Step to share the steps of the scientific method with the class so you can discuss them. When you come to one of the vocabulary words, have your “Word Whiz” define them using the TalkingBrix 2. One student can be assigned the extra duty of “Lab Assistant” to take photos of the experiment in progress with the camera app on an iPad/iPod using a Blue2 Switch. The resulting pictures could be made into a bulletin board with the results of the experiment so students can present their findings with more people.
    2. Allow students to choose a hypothesis using the All-Turn-It Spinner and complete a hypothesis using the Step-by-Step:
    - When the yellow cubes melt and mix with the blue cubes, I hypothesize the water will turn the color ___________.
    - When the blue cubes melt and mix with the red cubes, I hypothesize the water will turn the color ___________.
    - When the red cubes melt and mix with the yellow cubes, I hypothesize the water will turn the color ___________.
    3. Label the cups/jars and place 2 ice cubes of 2 colors (2 red + 2 blue, 2 blue + 2 yellow, 2 yellow + 2 red) into each corresponding cup/jar and allow to melt. Place the cups/jars in the sun or near a heat source to speed up the melting process if you don’t want to wait overnight.
    - To add another level of difficulty, use different amounts of ice cubes in cups or all colors and challenge students to think about what will happen with those cups.
    - Another fun addition would be to create a time-lapse video of the ice cubes melting. This can be done with an iPad with iOS 8 or digital cameras.
    4. Once the ice cubes have all melted, students can record their data, and use the TalkingBrix 2 to tell the class if their hypothesis was correct or incorrect. Remind students that having a wrong hypothesis is not a bad thing, many scientists have had wrong hypotheses.

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | social skills | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Know Your Friends Game Show!

    Know Your Friends Game Show!

    In this Remarkable Idea students will answer trivia questions about their classmates. This activity can be modified to allow for a review game of concepts taught in the classroom.

    This activity addresses:

    • Sportsmanship
    • Social skills
    • Turn taking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Using student interest inventories, design questions about student’s favorite colors, foods, books, etc.
    2. Teacher can write these answers on index cards to save time during game play.
    3. Record team colors (red, blue, or green) onto the corresponding TalkingBrix 2, these will act as that team’s buzzer. Students can also choose a team name to be recorded onto their TalkingBrix 2.
    4. Record “A”,”B”,”C”, and “D” onto the QuickTalker 7, as well as phrases such as “I think the answer is…” , “I know the answer is…”, and “I’m going to guess…”, students will use this to select their answers.
    5. On the QuickTalker 12 record phrases such as “Let’s get started”, “Red Team”, “Blue Team”, “Green Team”, “Nice Try”, “Correct”, “That is incorrect”, as well as other motivating game show host phrases.
    6. On the All-Turn-It Spinner, write point values for each question (100, 200, 300, etc.)

    What to do:

    1. Designate a student to be the game show host and hosts assistant (jobs can be combined if necessary) and divide the classroom into teams.
    2. Each team will choose a player to go first.
    3. The “Assistant” will choose a picture or name card for the topic, and the “Host” will use the Step-by-Step to choose a question. (Ex. John and Favorite color)
    4. The students will “buzz in” using the TalkingBrix 2. The first team to buzz in will get the chance to answer first using the QuickTalker 7. If they are incorrect the other teams can buzz in and try to answer the question.

    Keywords

    turn taking | talkingbrix 2 | sportsmanship | soundingboard app | social studies | quicktalker 7 | quicktalker 12 | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Farm, Farming, Farmed

    Farm, Farming, Farmed

    In this activity, students add endings to a root verb to create new tenses and use them in a sentence to confirm their understanding.

    This activity addresses:

    • Language Arts
    • Learning verb tenses
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:[/su_heading]

    Preparation:

    1. Divide the All-Turn-It Spinner’s large overlay into eight equal spaces. Write one verb in each space on the overlay and place it on the spinner. Examples: farm, paint, walk, jump, skip, wink, look.
    2. Divide the blank side of the small overlay into three equal spaces. Write the words “past tense,” “present tense” and “future tense” on the overlay, one verb tense per space.

    What to do:

    1. The student spins the arrow of the All-Turn-It Spinner by activating a switch connected to it.
    2. The students read the verb the arrow points to on the large overlay and the verb tense the arrow points to on the small overlay, and convert the verb into the correct form.
    3. The students then use the new verb form in a sentence. For example, “The past tense of bike is biked. Yesterday I biked to the store to buy an apple.”

    Alternative Options
    Use the All-Turn-It Spinner to give students practice with antonyms and synonyms. Divide the small overlay into four equal spaces and write the word ANTONYM alternately with the word SYNONYM in the blank spaces. Divide the large overlay into eight equal spaces and write practice words in the blank spaces, one word per space. Students spin the Spinner and name the synonym or antonym of the word to which the arrow points

    Keywords

    switches | learning verb tense | language arts | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |