bigmack

  1. Better Breakfast Month

    Better Breakfast Month

    Did you know that Better Breakfast Month is celebrated in September? We’ve created a Remarkable Idea to help you celebrate!

    In this Remarkable Idea we’ll show you how to integrate assistive technology to make a smoothie.

    • create an accessible learning environment
    • enable students to show what they’ve learned
    • create a yummy fruit smoothie

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | quicktalker 7 | powerlink 4 | italk2 with levels | following directions | choice making | candy corn | bigmack | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  2. Sight Word Seek and Steal

    Sight Word Seek and Steal

    In this Remarkable Idea, students work together as they take turns stapling together three sets of circles to make a snowman.

    This activity addresses:

    • Reading
    • Turn taking
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Write all the spelling/sight words on index cards or on the whiteboard (arrange words in a grid format).
    2. Record all the spelling/sight words to the Step-by-Step.
    3. Record a countdown on the BIGmack. When you get to zero, add a buzzing noise for effect.
    4. Determine how many points a team will need to win, then using each Step-by-Step record points (one for each step). On the last point put a congratulatory message to the winning team.

    What to do:

    1. Separate students into two teams and choose a team to go first.
    2. Choose a scorekeeper for each team or one scorekeeper for both teams.
    3. Choose a timekeeper. They will be responsible for hitting the BIGmack and starting the timer for each student’s turn.
    4. Teams or individuals from each team take turns pressing the Step-by-Step and looking for the random word given. Remind the timekeeper to start the timer.
    5. If the student finds the word before time is up, their team gets a point using the Step-by-Step – remind the scorekeeper to add a point to that team’s total.
    6. If the timer buzzes before they find the word, the other team has a chance to steal the point.
    7. Continue until you are out of words or reach the point goal.

    Additional Suggestions:
    To add a level of difficulty, you can add misspelled words to the grid.

    Keywords

    turn taking | step-by-step | reading | cause and effect | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  3. Groundhog's Day

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about Groundhog’s Day, create their own groundhogs, and eat a Groundhog Day treat.

    This activity addresses:

    • Social Skills
    • Fine Motor
    • Functional Skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • BIG or LITTLEmack
    • Jelly Bean Switch
    • PowerLink 4
    • Toilet paper roll (1 for each student)
    • Construction paper/cardstock (brown, green, white, black)
    • Black marker
    • Glue
    • Craft sticks/popsicle sticks (1 for each student)
    • Desk lamp with flexible head/Flashlight
    • Electric mixer
    • Instant chocolate pudding
    • Mixing bowl
    • Small plastic cups/bowls
    • Vanilla wafers
    • Sliced almonds (can be omitted for allergies)
    • Brown decorating gel

    Preparation:

    1. Use groundhog template page to cut out pieces for groundhogs from brown, white, and black construction paper or print groundhog template page on cardstock and cut out pieces.
    2. Record information about Groundhog Day to a BIG or LITTLEmack.
    3. Cut green construction paper in half so you have two 8.5 x 5.5 pieces (1 for each student). Make 1 inch cuts along one end. The green paper will be wrapped around the toilet paper rolls as grass with the strips sticking up over the top of the tube.

    What to do:

    Groundhog Day Activity
    1. Select a student to tell the class about Groundhog Day.
    2. Pass out the pieces for each student to make their groundhog and assist them in gluing the pieces together. Insert the craft stick between the two body pieces.
    3. Give each student a toilet paper roll and a piece of green construction paper. Assist students as necessary with wrapping the paper around the tube and gluing it on.
    4. Once finished students will be able to hold the craft stick and make their groundhog pop out of the ground (toilet paper roll).
    5. Connect the desk lamp and a Jelly Bean Switch to the PowerLink 4. Place the lamp facing towards a wall so students can take turns making their groundhog pop out of the ground to see if their groundhog sees their shadow. Students rotate between activating “the sun” and playing with their groundhogs.

    Groundhog Day Treat – Vanilla Wafer Groundhogs in Mud
    1. Connect the electric mixer and a Jelly Bean Switch to a PowerLink 4.
    2. Follow instructions for the instant pudding, allow students to activate the mixer. (Children should not be allowed near the mixer.)
    3. Pour the pudding into cups.
    4. Give each student a vanilla wafer and two sliced almonds.
    5. Use the decorating gel to draw a face on the vanilla wafer groundhog.
    6. Use the decorating gel as an adhesive to attach the ears (almond slices).
    7. Place your groundhog in the “mud” and enjoy.

    Script:

    “February 2nd is Groundhog Day. Groundhog Day is the day where the groundhog is supposed to come out of hibernation and poke his head out of the ground. If the groundhog sees his shadow he will go back into his burrow and we will have six more weeks of winter. If the groundhog does not see his shadow that means spring is on its way. The most famous groundhog is Punxsutawney Phil from Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Today we will make our own groundhogs and we can see if they see their shadow or not.”

    Keywords

    powerlink 4 | littlemack | jelly bean switch | functional life skills | fine motor skills | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  4. Give It A Rest

    Give It A Rest

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will be allowed a few minutes to give their brains a rest in different ways.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Mental wellness
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    Seventh Inning Stretch
    1. Set up the computer, Jelly Bean, and Hitch 2 so the student can activate the switch to start the video clip.

    Balloon/Beach Ball Time
    1. Blow up balloons or beach balls and have the students hit them around the room.
    2. Record “More!” to a BIGmack so students can let you know they want more balloons or beach balls.

    Box of Tricks
    1. Create a box or bag of tricks. For extra fun draw questions marks or other symbols on the outside.

    Would you rather?
    1.Record different scenarios to the Step-by-Step and challenge students to decide which option they would rather choose.
    Examples: Would you rather ski on ice cream or swim in Jell-O?
    Would you rather go to school or go to the doctor?
    Would you rather have super strength or the ability to fly?
    2. Record “The first one” and “The second one” to an iTalk2 with Levels so students can choose an option.

    Deep Breathing
    1. Record “Breathe in (pause 2-4 seconds) Breathe out” to a BIGmack.

    Musical Movie Time
    1. Find some classical music or instrumental movie scores for your students to listen to.
    2. Many classical songs can be found here: https://archive.org/details/Best100InstrumentalSongs
    3. Set up the computer, Jelly Bean, and Hitch 2 so the student can activate the switch to start the video clip.

    Simple Tasks
    1. Record simple tasks that are appropriate for your students to a Step-by-StepExamples: Touch your nose, touch your ear, stick out your tongue, etc.

    What to do:

    Seventh Inning Stretch
    1. Let your students get a good stretch. Choose a student to be in charge of starting the video using a Jelly Bean and Hitch 2 (set to space bar).
    2. Example clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxyjkXrUzdE

    Balloon/Beach Ball Time
    1. Begin with one ball or balloon. Students can use the BIGmack to ask for more balloons or beach balls. The idea is to get energy out, not necessarily to hit the ball to or at their classmates.

    Box of Tricks
    1. Pass out random objects from the Box of Tricks and ask students what they think it is, or come up with a different use for it.

    Would You Rather
    1. Choose one student to ask the questions using the Step-by-Step, and allow the students to answer using the iTalk2 with Levels and even discuss the questions.

    Deep Breathing
    1. Choose one student to lead the group by using the BIGmack to instruct students to breathe in an out.

    Musical Movie Time
    1. Explain to students that music can be very powerful, and can even tell a story.
    2. Choose a student to start the music by pressing the Jelly Bean.
    3. Challenge students to come up with a story to match what they are hearing.

    Simple Tasks
    1. Choose a student to call out directions for simple actions.
    2. Student activates the Step-by-Step, and the class follows the directions as quickly as possible.

    Script:

    “Everyone needs time to relax, and time to have fun. Even adults. We are going to do an activity where you don’t have to work. The idea is to relax, and have fun.”

    Additional suggestions:

    Turning the classroom lights off, when done safely, can add to the relaxing nature of these activities.
    The possibilities are endless for these types of activities.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | mental health | jelly bean switch | italk2 with levels | hitch | cause and effect | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  5. Join and Separate - It's in the Bag!

    Join and Separate - It's in the Bag!

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will work on their number conservation and subitizing skills

    This activity addresses:

    • Beginning addition skills
    • Number conservation
    • Fine motor skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Locking sandwich bags
    • Small manipulatives (bingo chips, shapes, animals, etc.) must all be the same kind.
    • Permanent marker or masking tape
    • Number cards
    • Plus symbol card
    • Equals symbol card
    • BIGmack
    • Step-by-Step

    Preparation:

    1. Prepare sandwich bags by drawing or taping a vertical line down the center of the bag.
    2. If appropriate, record numbers to Step-by-Step for counting.
    3. Create appropriate overlays

    What to do:

    1. Place manipulatives in the bag; amount will vary depending on each student’s skill level. Show the student the side without the marker or tape line, and ask the students to count how many.
    2. Students count the number of manipulatives in the bag. Record this number to the BIGmack and place the corresponding number card on it.
    3. Turn the bag over, and have the students separate the manipulatives into groups on either side of the line.
    4. Have the student count the number in each new set they created. Place the corresponding number card on each side of the bag.
    5. Show the student that the two smaller sets can be joined to make the original number by placing a plus and equals signs in the correct spaces.

    Script:

    “Good, you counted 5. Can you separate the set of 5 into two smaller sets?”
    “Good, now we have sets of 1 and 4.” “1 and 4 make 5”

    Additional suggestions:

    The BIGmack should always have the original number that was in the bag recorded on it for students to reference in case they forget. The Step-by-Step should be used for counting.
    This activity can also be used for subtraction by taking a separated set away.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | number conservation | math | fine motor skills | equals symbol card | bigmack | beginning addition skills | alternative methods of access |

  6. Old Time Radio

    Old Time Radio

    Podcasts are a popular media in today’s society, but they are certainly not a new concept. In this Remarkable Idea, your students will create their own radio show or podcast.

    This activity addresses:

    • Communication skills
    • Technology
    • Teamwork
    • Critical thinking
    • Creative thinking
    • Fine motor skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Optional Hardware

    • Microphone

    Free Resources

    • Sound Effects – YouTube or BoundBible.com (There are a lot of other sites, just be sure they are free. Sound effects can be expensive!)
    • Software – AudacityTeam.org (free audio recording/editing program)
    • Archive.org – listen to old radio plays (you can also search the internet for “old time radio”)
    • iTunes store/Stitcher.com – download/listen to free podcasts
    • genericradio.com – (free radio play scripts)

    Preparation:

    1. Decide on a format (Radio play, top ten music countdown, news show, talk radio, movie/book review, etc.) for your radio show, or a script from a radio play that is appropriate for your classroom and students. If you choose to come up with an original radio play, decide on some appropriate themes or settings for your students.
    2. Download “Audacity” from AudacityTeam.org to record and edit your radio show.
    3. Find some appropriate podcasts/radio shows for your students to listen to. This will give them an idea of what your lesson is all about.
    4. If you have a radio play in mind, you may wish to gather your sound effects and record them to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    5. Record the shows music intro to a BIGmack
    6. Record sound effects to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    7. Set up Audacity to record with the Hitch 2 and two Jelly Bean switches.

    • Open Audacity and go to preferences > keyboard
    • Change the shortcut for “Record” from the letter “R” to the number 0
    • Change the shortcuts for “Stop” and “Play” from the space bar to the number 3 (they share a shortcut)

    8. Plug in your Hitch 2 and Jelly Bean switches so the Recording Engineer can control the recording.

    What to do:

    1. Begin by discussing the history of home entertainment (video games, TV, radio, etc.)
    2. Play some examples of old radio shows. Ask the class if they know anything that is popular now that is similar; discuss podcasts.
    3. Play an example of a podcast.
    4. Assign roles to students and give them scripts (be sure to add symbols and marks so students know when it’s their turn to talk or to use a particular sound effect):

    • Recording engineer (the person who presses record and stop)
    • Sound designers/sound effect specialists (they will choose sound effects and add them to the show when necessary)
    • Actors/DJs/Show hosts
    • Writers (if applicable, maybe all students will be writers, maybe you will not have any writers)

    5. Record the shows music intro to a BIGmack
    6. Record sound effects to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    7. Do a read-through with your class so they can practice reading and using sound effects/music at the right time. (You may wish to record the rehearsal).
    8. On the Air! Record your show (you may need to record multiple times to get everything right.)
    9. Edit the show - you may wish to do this together as a class and ask their opinions. Do you need more/different sound effects or music? More commercials, less commercials? etc.
    10. Once you have a finished product, “export” your project from Audacity and allow your class to listen to their radio show.

    Script:

    “What are some things you like to do for fun when you’re at home?” Someone will inevitably say watch movies, TV, or play video games.
    “Before video games and television, people used to listen to the radio for fun. There used to be shows, kind of like the ones on TV that you would listen to and mentally picture.”
    “Podcasts are like radio shows that you can listen to whenever you like. They do not have a set time limit.”
    “We are going to be creating our very own radio show or podcast in our class.”

    Vocabulary:

    Podcast
    Soundscape

    Additional suggestions:

    To make recording easier for your and your students, consider recording everything separately and combining it later.
    - Record commercials in advance.
    - Record dialogue, sound effects, and music separately.
    Most if not all laptops have a built-in microphone or webcam. You can use this to record your show (Audacity will allow you to import audio from a video) or you can use an external microphone.
    Burn a copy of the radio show to a disc or distribute them digitally so your students can share the show with their families.

    Keywords

    technology | team work | talktrac | talkingbrix 2 | supertalker ft | quicktalker freestyle | quicktalker 7 | quicktalker 23 | quicktalker 12 | jelly bean switch | hitch | critical thinking | creative thinking | communication skills | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  7. Mystery Word of the Day

    Mystery Word of the Day

    This is a quick Remarkable Idea you can add to the beginning of your daily routine.

    This activity addresses:

    • Vocabulary
    • Awareness in the classroom
    • Cause and Effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record the word of the day (or week) to the BIGmack.
    2. Record a definition to each of the TalkingBrix 2. One should be the correct definition; the other two should be fake.
    3. Write the word on a note card or write it on a few cards so when students choose a word, they feel like they are choosing from a large group.

    What to do:

    1. When the student pulls the word of the day from the Mystery Container, have them read the word or press the BIGmack.
    2. Use the word in a sentence for the students, and then challenge them to find the correct definition from the three TalkingBrix 2.
    3. Have students activate the TalkingBrix 2, one at a time, so they can hear each definition. Then they must find the correct definition.
    4. For the rest of the day, the students should be Word Detectives. If they hear the word used in class; they cannot use it themselves, they can press the BIGmack to remind the rest of the class what the Mystery Word of the day is. Keep track of which student is the best detective each day; they can be the one to pick the word the following day.

    Additional suggestions:

    If the word warrants it, you can add an action or sound to be used in conjunction with the word.
    Examples:
    -If the word is leap, students can jump when they say it.
    -If the word is onomatopoeia, students can give an example of the definition; Boom.

    Keywords

    vocabulary | talkingbrix 2 | cause and effect | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  8. Caramel Apple Bites

    Caramel Apple Bites

    With Fall approaching and apples ready to be picked, this is a great activity to do with students. Students will have fun cooking this tasty treat!

    This activity addresses:

    • Following isntructions
    • Mearsuing ingredients
    • Functional cooking skills
    • Fine motor skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Step-by-Step
    • Jelly Beamer/Big Beamer
    • PowerLink
    • BIG/LITTLEmack
    • One bag of caramels or caramel bits, and caramel toppings such as sprinkles (optional)
    • 6 apples and apple slicer or knife
    • 2 Tablespoons of milk (can substitute water)
    • Toothpicks, paper plates, and small paper cups (optional)
    • Apple slicer or knife
    • Toothpicks
    • Brown and green construction paper
    • Whisk (optional)

    Preparation:

    1. Record “A tree”, “The ground” on a BIG/LITTLEmack.
    2. Record various things you can make using apples on a Step-by-Step (pies, jam, butter, muffins, applesauce, caramel apples).
    3. Cut apples into bite-sized pieces and place toothpicks in them. If you do this far in advance refrigerate the apples to keep them from turning brown. Alternatively, apples can be cut into bigger pieces and wedged into a whisk for students who may not be able to hold a toothpick for dipping.
    4. On a bulletin board or wall in the room, make an empty tree with leaves on which students can hang the plate apples they make.

    What to do:

    1. Discuss apples with the class.
    “Does anyone know what this is (hold up an apple)? That’s right, it’s an apple! Where do apples come from, a tree or the ground?” (Students use BIG/LITTLEmack to answer)
    “Today we are going to pick apples and make something out of them. Does anyone know what we can make using apples? (Students use Step-by-Step to answer)
    “Today we are going to make caramel apple bites.”
    2. Have students place caramel candies in a bowl to be melted. Measure out 2 tablespoons of milk or water and add it to the bowl.
    3. Melt the caramel candies, which can be done a few ways: Using a microwave, using a slow cooker, or a stove top. If you use a slow cooker, place water at the bottom and add the candies in a heat tolerant bowl. Students can turn the slow cooker on using the PowerLink and a Jelly Beamer/Big Beamer, but be careful not to get too close! For the stove top, cook on low-medium heat until the caramel is melted. Caution: caramel can cook unevenly and be extremely hot!
    4. Students can begin to work on their apple plates for the classroom apple tree. Using a small paper plate, students can use a red or green colors using crayons, paint, markers, paper tiles, etc. to decorate their plate.
    5. Once the caramel is ready, students can take turns dipping their apple bites into the caramel and topping of their choice. Toppings could also be placed into a cup to be poured onto the caramel apple bites. Place the finished apple bites into the refrigerator to allow the caramel topping to become firm.
    6. Hang up finished plates on the classroom apple tree.
    7. Enjoy the caramel apple bites!

    Keywords

    step-by-step | powerlink 4 | little beamer | following directions | fine motor skills | cooking skills | bigmack | big beamer | alternative methods of access |

  9. Here Comes Fall!

    Here Comes Fall!

    In this activity students will conduct an experiment called chromatography to see the different colors in a leaf, and discuss why leaves change color in the fall. In addition to this experiment, students will use fall colors to create marbled leaves.

    This activity addresses:

    • Following directions
    • Sensory experience
    • Science skills
    • Science of bubbles
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • BIGmack or LITTLEmack
    • Jelly Bean
    • My Art Spinnerr
    • Battery Device Adapter
    • Adapted scissors
    • Leaves
    • Rubbing alcohol
    • Small glasses/jars (baby food)
    • Coffee filters/filter paper
    • Hot water
    • Pencils/sticks (one per student)
    • Shaving cream
    • Baking pan
    • Finger paint
    • Construction paper

    Preparation:

    1. Cut out leaf shapes from the construction paper.
    2. Record the word “Autumn” on a BIGmack or LITTLEmack.
    3. Record “red”, “orange”, and “brown” on BIGmack or LITTLEmack so students can choose their colors.

    What to do for chromatography:

    1. Students can use the adapted scissors to cut a leaf into small pieces, and place them into the small glasses.
    2. Older students can use the scientific method and develop a hypothesis as to what is going to happen.
    3. Teacher adds a small amount of rubbing alcohol to the glass - enough to cover the leaves is fine. The alcohol will slowly change color from the chlorophyll in the leaves. To speed this up, place the glasses in a hot water bath.
    4. Students can use the adapted scissor to cut strips from the coffee filters.
    5. Attach the coffee filter strips to a pencil. Place pencil over glass so that strips hang down into the alcohol. After 30 – 90 minutes, bands of colors will be noticeable on the coffee filters.

    What to do for the art project:

    1. Place shaving cream on a table or in a baking pan and put fall colored finger paint (red, orange, brown) on top of the shaving cream.
    2. Allow students to swirl the paint around a little (not too much that the colors mix) and add glitter or other decorations.
    3. Place leaf cut outs or construction paper on the shaving cream.
    4. Students that cannot participate with the shaving cream and finger paint can paint their leaves using the My Art Spinner and Battery Device Adapter with a Jelly Bean.
    5. Once the paper is face down in the shaving cream lift it off, and scrape any excess shaving cream from the paper. Allow them to dry.
    6. Students can then play in the leftover shaving cream to draw pictures or practice writing.

    Scripts for activity:

    1. “Very soon the season will be changing from summer to fall. Another name for fall is autumn. Does anyone know what happens to the leaves on the trees in fall?”
    2. “Do you know why the leaves change in the fall? Plants have pigments in them that determine their color. Leaves have the pigment chlorophyll in them that make them green as well as another other pigments called carotenoids. Chlorophyll makes the leaves green while carotenoids can make the leaves yellow, red, or orange.”
    3. “When the weather is warm the tree produces a lot of chlorophyll which is why the leaves are green. As the season changes from summer to fall the weather cools down and the tree produces less chlorophyll, this is when we get to see the colors from the carotenoids.”
    4. “Today we are going to perform an experiment that will hopefully show us some other colors in our leaves, besides the green we see when we look at them.”
    5. Students can then play in the leftover shaving cream to draw pictures or practice writing.

    Keywords

    sensory | science | littlemack | jelly bean switch | following directions | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  10. Forever Blowing Bubbles

    Forever Blowing Bubbles

    In this Remarkable Idea, students can collaborate and perform a great experiment using bubbles!

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Spatial awareness
    • Working in a group
    • Measuring distances
    • Forces: speed of fan vs. distance traveled
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • BIG or LITTLEmack (with symbol for bubbles)
    • Jelly Beamer and a href="https://www.ablenetinc.com/original-receiver" target="_blank">Original Receiver 2 (one with symbol for fan one with symbol for bubbles)
    • PowerLink 4
    • Bubble machine and bubble solution
    • Symbols for fan and bubbles (2)
    • Electric fan
    • Newspaper
    • Tape measure
    • Something to mark distance labeled 1,2, and 3

    Preparation:

    1. Plug the Bubble machine and fan into the PowerLink 4.
    2. Create bubble and fan symbols.
    3. Link the Original Receiver to the Jelly Beamer transmitters for the Bubble machine and fan plugged in to the PowerLink 4.
    4. Record ‘I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles’ on BIG or LITTLEmack.
    5. Put newspaper on the floor to keep it from getting slippery with bubble solution.

    What to do:

    1. Have the students decide on first setting for fan.
    2. Turn on the Bubble machine.
    3. Turn on the fan.
    4. Have a student play ‘I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles’ on BIG/LITTLEmack.
    5. Let the bubbles blow until the poem is finished.
    6. Record which bubble travels the greatest distance and mark the spot where it lands with the first bubble marker.
    7. Measure the distance from Bubble machine to tin can. This is recorded against the speed setting of the fan.
    8. Repeat process using different speed settings on the fan and different positioning of the Bubble machine.
    9. Re-position the fan angle and speed. Record which fan position and speed has the greatest effect on distance traveled.

    Script:

    Recording of ‘I’m forever blowing bubbles’ into BIG/LITTLEmack.
    “I’m forever blowing bubbles.
    Pretty bubbles in the air.
    They fly so high, nearly reach the sky.
    Then like my dreams, they fade and die.
    Fortune’s always hiding.
    I’ve looked everywhere.
    I’m forever blowing bubbles.
    Pretty bubbles in the air.”

    Keywords

    team work | spatial awareness | shapes | powerlink 4 | numeracy | littlemack | jelly beamer | forces | cause and effect | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  11. Mystery Key

    Mystery Key

    In this Remarkable Idea, switch tops are used as a hiding place. It’s a game for at least three players. The game can be adapted to support a wide range of curriculum goals from object permanence to social skills.

    This activity addresses:

    • Social skills
    • Visual follows
    • Cause and effect
    • Anticipation
    • Group working
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record the messages on the SuperTalker FT to correspond to this Mystery Key SuperTalker Overlay".

    • Location 1: “I’ve lost my key.”
    • Location 2: “Look under the big red one!”
    • Location 3: “What about the small green one?”
    • Location 4: “Check the big yellow one!”
    • Location 5: “Where can it be?”
    • Location 6: “Is it under the tiny yellow one?”
    • Location 7: “Maybe the big blue one?”
    • Location 8: “Take a peek under the small red one!

    2. Attach student/player pictures to the All-Turn-It Spinner using Velcro dots.

    What to do:

    1. In this game, the players work together to find a missing key which has been hidden under one of the switch tops.
    2. Use the All-Turn-It Spinner and the Jelly Beamerto decide who hides the key first. While all the others look away this person hides the key under one of the switch tops. Then he calls to the other players: “I’ve lost my key. Where can it be?”
    3. Use the All-Turn-It Spinner and the Jelly Beamer once more to decide who may guess first. The SuperTalker FT might be used by just one or all the players to do the guessing (e.g. “Look under the big yellow one!”). Each player has just one guess. And the player who finds the key is the next key hider.
    4. Variation to simplify the game: The guessed switch tops can either remain in the game or are taken off the table.
    5. Variation to support more complex goals: A different letter might be hidden under each switch top. So in the course of the game letters for a particular word must be collected in the correct order.

    Keywords

    visual cues | team work | supertalker ft | jelly beamer | cause and effect | bigmack | anticipation | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  12. Food Groups Categorizing Activity

    Food Groups Categorizing Activity

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about or review the food groups, and the types of foods that fit into each group. Students cut out pictures of foods from magazines, then select the food group that the food fits in. Students glue the food picture on a poster labeled with the corresponding food group name and/or picture/symbol.

    This activity addresses:

    • Turn taking
    • Fine motor skills
    • Health
    • Language arts
    • Food and nutrition
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Prepare the following food group pictures/symbols:

    • Protein
    • Dairy
    • Fruit
    • Vegetables
    • Grains

    2. On the top of each large sheet of construction paper, write the name of one of the five food groups. Add a matching picture/symbol of the food group if your students need picture/symbol support.
    3. Using the QuickTalker 7, create an overlay with the five food group pictures/symbols, and record the names of each of the food groups into each message location.

    What to do:

    1. Show students each of the food group pictures/symbols, and students give examples of food from that category.
    2. Students use battery-operated scissors to cut out pictures of different kinds of food, from magazines and newspapers.
    3. Place an assortment of the food pictures on the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    4. Students take turns spinning for a food picture. The teacher immediately programs the name of the food item into a BIGmack. The student uses the BIGmack to tell the others the name of the food item.
    5. The student selects the food group the item belongs in by activating a message location on a QuickTalker 7. When the correct food group is selected, the student identifies the construction paper with the matching food group word/picture symbol and glues the food picture on that sheet.

    Keywords

    quicktalker 7 | language arts | health | food and nutrition | bigmack | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  13. Classroom Baseball

    Classroom Baseball

    In this Remarkable Idea, your students will be able to participate in a modified game of America’s favorite pass time. This is a classroom based activity that doesn’t involve bats, balls, or broken windows!

    This activity addresses:

    • Sportsmanship
    • Social skills
    • Turn taking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Optional Materials:

    Preparation:

    Record baseball scenarios to the Step-by-Step or write them on an All-Turn-It Spinner overlay - single, double, triple, home run, out, strike out, etc. To ensure a quicker game, include more than one out option (write it a few times on your overlay or record it multiple times to the Step-by-Step.)
    Suggested number of each, you may wish to modify this for your game:
    4-outs and singles,
    2-strike outs and doubles
    1-home run and triple

    What to do:

    Put your team together
    Give each student a blank peg person and allow them to decorate/paint it however they choose, this will be their player. Allow to dry.

    Playing the game
    1. Draw your field on a large piece of paper or a white board so everyone can see, be sure to include a dugout for players waiting their turn.
    2. Decide how many innings you are going to play, split up into teams (uneven teams will not make a difference), and decide a home team.
    3. The visiting team goes first following typical baseball rules. Three outs per inning. If a player gets a single, advance their peg person one base, a double advances two places and so on.
    4. When a player is up to bat they will activate the Step-by-Step or All-Turn-It Spinner, and follow what it says.
    5. The game ends when the last inning is played or the game is called.

    Suggestions to make the game a bit more authentic:
    The National Anthem could be played before the game starts. (Record to BIGmack and have a student “sing” the National Anthem.)
    The seventh inning stretch could be observed. (Record “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” to a BIGmack and have a student “sing” it.)
    Popcorn or hot dogs could be served during the game.
    Record “Good game” to a BIGmack for players to show their sportsmanship at the conclusion of the game.
    Use a Step-by-Step for each team to keep score. Record numbers and have a student act as scorekeeper.

    Keywords

    turn taking | step-by-step | sportsmanship | social skills | bigmack | alternative methods of access |