cause and effect

  1. Switch Access Beyond Cause and Effect: Stepping Stones for Effective Learning - Part 3

    June 9, 2020 | 12:00 PM CST | 60 minutes

    Teaching switch access for the most severely involved students often focuses on single switch cause and effect games used over and over with little variation. Even though there are existing guidelines, educators and therapists may find it challenging to locate or create effective resources to teach the motor cognitive skills of learning switch access. What strategies and software features move students beyond cause effect and engage their brains in active learning? How can learning to use two switches without an element of timing put the child in control and provide opportunities for active problem-solving?

    This webinar series will clarify strategies for engaging the child's brain in the development of motor/cognitive learning and encourage problem-solving skills through the use of two switches. Examples of available resources, software, apps and websites that support the early steps of the Stepping Stones to Switch Access Process (Burkhart) will be shared.

    Part 3 of this series will focus on how to move individuals from "two switches, two functions" to learning to step-scan (failure-free with feedback).

    Cost:   Free
    Presenter:  

    Linda Burkhart and Fio Quinn, M.S. Private Consultant, Developer

    Level:  

    Beginner

    Keywords

    switch access | motor/cognitive learning | cause and effect | active problem solving |

  2. Switch Access Beyond Cause and Effect: Stepping Stones for Effective Learning - Part 2

    June 2, 2020 | 12:00 PM CST | 60 minutes

    Teaching switch access for the most severely involved students often focuses on single switch cause and effect games used over and over with little variation. Even though there are existing guidelines, educators and therapists may find it challenging to locate or create effective resources to teach the motor cognitive skills of learning switch access. What strategies and software features move students beyond cause effect and engage their brains in active learning? How can learning to use two switches without an element of timing put the child in control and provide opportunities for active problem-solving?

    This webinar series will clarify strategies for engaging the child's brain in the development of motor/cognitive learning and encourage problem-solving skills through the use of two switches. Examples of available resources, software, apps and websites that support the early steps of the Stepping Stones to Switch Access Process (Burkhart) will be shared.

    Part 2 of this series will focus on issues with "timing" and why "two switch step scanning" may make a better tool for learning switch access.

    Cost:   Free
    Presenter:  

    Linda Burkhart and Fio Quinn, M.S. Private Consultant, Developer

    Level:  

    Beginner

    Keywords

    switch access | motor/cognitive learning | cause and effect | active problem solving |

  3. Sight Word Seek and Steal

    Sight Word Seek and Steal

    In this Remarkable Idea, students work together as they take turns stapling together three sets of circles to make a snowman.

    This activity addresses:

    • Reading
    • Turn taking
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Write all the spelling/sight words on index cards or on the whiteboard (arrange words in a grid format).
    2. Record all the spelling/sight words to the Step-by-Step.
    3. Record a countdown on the BIGmack. When you get to zero, add a buzzing noise for effect.
    4. Determine how many points a team will need to win, then using each Step-by-Step record points (one for each step). On the last point put a congratulatory message to the winning team.

    What to do:

    1. Separate students into two teams and choose a team to go first.
    2. Choose a scorekeeper for each team or one scorekeeper for both teams.
    3. Choose a timekeeper. They will be responsible for hitting the BIGmack and starting the timer for each student’s turn.
    4. Teams or individuals from each team take turns pressing the Step-by-Step and looking for the random word given. Remind the timekeeper to start the timer.
    5. If the student finds the word before time is up, their team gets a point using the Step-by-Step – remind the scorekeeper to add a point to that team’s total.
    6. If the timer buzzes before they find the word, the other team has a chance to steal the point.
    7. Continue until you are out of words or reach the point goal.

    Additional Suggestions:
    To add a level of difficulty, you can add misspelled words to the grid.

    Keywords

    turn taking | step-by-step | reading | cause and effect | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  4. Valentine's Day

    Valentine's Day

    In this Remarkable Idea, have fun with your students by creating valentines for their parents, playing a custom game of guess who, and showing them you care with a heart shaped cake.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Social skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Create your “mystery valentine box”. Paint an empty Altoid tin using pink or red paint.
    2. Record attribute questions to the QuickTalker 12 for your mystery game (example: Is your valentine a boy? Is your valentine a girl? Does your valentine have black hair? Etc.) Or create a board using the SoundingBoard App with attribute questions.
    3. Record “yes” and “no” to the TalkingBrix 2.
    4. Create your symbol overlays.


    What to do:

    Valentine’s Day Cards
    1. Using an iPad, the Blue2 Bluetooth Switch, and the camera app take a picture of each student holding out their hand and making a fist (like they are holding a large candy sucker.)
    2. Assign a camera operator to be in charge of taking each student’s picture (don’t forget to take a picture of the camera operator as well!)
    3. Before putting the iPad away, take a second picture of each student to be used in the Valentine’s Day guessing game (a close-up of their face.)
    4. Print out the pictures.
    5. Using the picture of each student holding out their fist, poke a hole large enough for the sucker stick to fit through at the top and bottom of their first, slide the sucker through the holes (it should appear as though they are holding the sucker).

    Mystery Valentine
    1. Using the pictures previously taken, cut them to size in order to fit into the Mystery Valentine Box.
    2. Randomly select a Mystery Valentine and put their picture into the Mystery Valentine Box.
    3. Select a Valentine Recipient to come up in front of the class. They should open the Mystery Box and see who is inside (don’t let anyone else see!)
    4. The Valentine Recipient will answer questions the students ask, trying to identify the Mystery Valentine. The class can ask questions using the QuickTalker 12 or SoundingBoard App.
    5. The Valentine Recipient will answer yes or no using the TalkingBrix if necessary, until the Valentine is correctly guessed. Whoever is the Mystery Valentine will be the next recipient.
    6. Play until all Mystery Valentines have been guessed.

    Heart Cake
    1. Follow the directions from the cake mix to make 1 of each shape cake (circle and square). Use the PowerLink 4, electric mixer, and Jelly Bean Switch to allow students to assist with mixing.
    2. Once the two cakes are done baking and have cooled, place them somewhere where all the students can see them.
    3. Explain that we can use shapes to make other shapes, and that by cutting the circle in half or into two semi-circles, we can make a heart.
    4. Rotate the square cake forty-five degrees and place one semi-circle on each of the two top sides of the cake to make a heart shape.
    5. Frost the cake and enjoy.

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | soundingboard app | social skills | quicktalker 12 | powerlink 4 | jelly bean switch | cause and effect | blue2 bluetooth switch | alternative methods of access |

  5. 100th Day of School

    In this Remarkable Idea, explore the number 100 and improve students’ number sense. The hundredth day of school is an exciting opportunity for students to explore the number 100 through activities, discussions, and art projects allowing students to gain a better understanding of what the number 100 means to them.

    This activity addresses:

    • Social skills
    • Choice making
    • Cause and effect
    • Fine motor skills
    • Number sense
    • Creative thinking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Using cups, bowls, mason jars, or some other container students can see through, make pairs of 100 and non-100 items such as pennies, cotton balls, or small candies.
    2. Count and separate a set of 100 mini pretzel sticks for each student in class.
    3. Using a hot glue gun, glue 100 crayons to the top of the canvas side by side.
    4. Using school glue, write the number 100 in bubble letters on the middle of the canvas. Make sure you use a thick bead of glue to prevent wax from entering the 100 later on.

    What to do:

    Counting to 100
    1. Begin by counting 100 days with your students. Explain that there are different ways we can count.
    - Give each student a blank ten frame and allow them to fill in each box by coloring, using stickers, or a bingo dotter. Use the ten frames to model counting to 100 by tens. A Step-by-Step can be used to assist with counting by tens.
    - Ask student’s how many fingers they have, and how many students they would need to get to 100. Include toes to get students thinking about other ways to make 100.
    - Using the coins, ask students how many nickels, dimes, or quarters you would need to make $1.00. Model counting by each. A Step-by-Step can be used to assist with counting.

    Thinking about 100
    1. Using a blank All-Turn-It Spinner overlay, write talking points such as eat, walk, hold, do, etc.
    - Use a Jelly Bean switch to activate the All-Turn-It Spinner and when it lands on a category ask students to think about something they could eat 100 of, or how far 100 steps would get them, etc. This could be modified by using an iTalk2 with Levels and giving students a choice between two things (ex. Could you eat 100: Cheeseburgers or jelly beans.)
    2. Using a blank All-Turn-It Spinner overlay, write more than/less than talking points such as “When it rains do you think there are more than 100 or less than 100 rain drops?”, “At the Super Bowl are there more than 100 or less than 100 fans in the stadium?”, or “Are there more than 100 or less than 100 keys on the computer keyboards in our school?”
    - Use a Jelly Bean switch to activate the All-Turn-It Spinner and when it lands on a scenario ask students to decide whether it’s more than 100 or less than 100.
    3. Present the previously made sets of 100 and non-100 items to students and ask them to guess which container is the one with 100 in it. Use an iTalk2 with Levels to let students decide which container has 100. (record “This one has 100.” and “This one has less than 100.” on each side of the iTalk2 with Levels)

    Fun with 100
    1. Give each student a set of 100 pretzel sticks and allow them to create anything they can with the pretzel sticks.
    - Allow students the opportunity to explore the many different images they can create.
    2. Place your canvas in a vertical position (on a stand or have an adult hold it) with the crayons at the top.
    3. Connect a hair dryer to the PowerLink 4, and connect a Jelly Bean switch to it. Allow students to take turns melting the crayons on the top of the canvas.
    4. As the crayon wax melts, it should stay on the outside of the 100 leaving you with a one of a kind piece of art for your classroom made by your students.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social skills | powerlink 4 | numbers | jelly bean switch | italk2 with levels | fine motor skills | creative thinking | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  6. Give It A Rest

    Give It A Rest

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will be allowed a few minutes to give their brains a rest in different ways.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Mental wellness
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    Seventh Inning Stretch
    1. Set up the computer, Jelly Bean, and Hitch 2 so the student can activate the switch to start the video clip.

    Balloon/Beach Ball Time
    1. Blow up balloons or beach balls and have the students hit them around the room.
    2. Record “More!” to a BIGmack so students can let you know they want more balloons or beach balls.

    Box of Tricks
    1. Create a box or bag of tricks. For extra fun draw questions marks or other symbols on the outside.

    Would you rather?
    1.Record different scenarios to the Step-by-Step and challenge students to decide which option they would rather choose.
    Examples: Would you rather ski on ice cream or swim in Jell-O?
    Would you rather go to school or go to the doctor?
    Would you rather have super strength or the ability to fly?
    2. Record “The first one” and “The second one” to an iTalk2 with Levels so students can choose an option.

    Deep Breathing
    1. Record “Breathe in (pause 2-4 seconds) Breathe out” to a BIGmack.

    Musical Movie Time
    1. Find some classical music or instrumental movie scores for your students to listen to.
    2. Many classical songs can be found here: https://archive.org/details/Best100InstrumentalSongs
    3. Set up the computer, Jelly Bean, and Hitch 2 so the student can activate the switch to start the video clip.

    Simple Tasks
    1. Record simple tasks that are appropriate for your students to a Step-by-StepExamples: Touch your nose, touch your ear, stick out your tongue, etc.

    What to do:

    Seventh Inning Stretch
    1. Let your students get a good stretch. Choose a student to be in charge of starting the video using a Jelly Bean and Hitch 2 (set to space bar).
    2. Example clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxyjkXrUzdE

    Balloon/Beach Ball Time
    1. Begin with one ball or balloon. Students can use the BIGmack to ask for more balloons or beach balls. The idea is to get energy out, not necessarily to hit the ball to or at their classmates.

    Box of Tricks
    1. Pass out random objects from the Box of Tricks and ask students what they think it is, or come up with a different use for it.

    Would You Rather
    1. Choose one student to ask the questions using the Step-by-Step, and allow the students to answer using the iTalk2 with Levels and even discuss the questions.

    Deep Breathing
    1. Choose one student to lead the group by using the BIGmack to instruct students to breathe in an out.

    Musical Movie Time
    1. Explain to students that music can be very powerful, and can even tell a story.
    2. Choose a student to start the music by pressing the Jelly Bean.
    3. Challenge students to come up with a story to match what they are hearing.

    Simple Tasks
    1. Choose a student to call out directions for simple actions.
    2. Student activates the Step-by-Step, and the class follows the directions as quickly as possible.

    Script:

    “Everyone needs time to relax, and time to have fun. Even adults. We are going to do an activity where you don’t have to work. The idea is to relax, and have fun.”

    Additional suggestions:

    Turning the classroom lights off, when done safely, can add to the relaxing nature of these activities.
    The possibilities are endless for these types of activities.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | mental health | jelly bean switch | italk2 with levels | hitch | cause and effect | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  7. Math Mystery

    Math Mystery

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will use various math skills to solve a crime.

    This activity addresses:

    • Critical thinking
    • Math
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Cardboard box (for the safe)
    • Crime scene tape/crepe paper
    • Analog Clock (teaching clock, real clock, etc.)
    • Step-by-Step
    • iPad with SoundingBoard
    • TalkingBrix 2
    • Calculator
    • Various crime scene things (anything that can be placed at the crime scene to throw off your detectives)

    Preparation:

    1. Create a secret code worksheet. How the message is coded is up to you, some options include (numerical codes, transportation codes, solve the equation codes, etc.). An example message would be: To: RR, The safe is in Mrs. Swenson’s classroom. Signed, PP. Students will use this information to narrow down their suspects.
    2. Set the clock to 3:15.
    3. Record times to the TalkingBrix 2 for students to choose from.
    4. Record the script to the Step-by-Step.
    5. Print out or write on a white board the information of the 6 suspects. Students can cross off suspects that don’t fit the crime.

    What to do:

    The students will see the crime scene and must collect clues to solve the crime. Have a student activate the Step-by-Step to contact the police chief, he will give the detectives some information (you may wish to write down the 4 things he/she mentions to look for). As students progress through the activity, they will check in with him/her.

    Secret Message
    At the crime scene, there will be a crumpled up piece of paper with a message. For example: RR, The safe is in Mrs. Swenson’s class. PP
    The students must solve this piece of the puzzle to get the initials of the person in the letter.

    Broken Clock
    At the crime scene, there will be a broken clock that reads 3:15. The time on this clock is important because it will help the security guard look at the right time on the security camera.
    Students can use the TalkingBrix 2 to choose the correct time from a field of three.
    *Check in with the Police Chief with the time from the clock.*
    When the security guard checks the tape, he will see that the suspect is 6’2”.

    What was stolen?
    Left over in the safe is $13.57. The safe originally had $160.00 in it, how much was stolen? Students can use calculators or the SoundingBoard app to answer.
    *Check in with the Police Chief.*

    Script:

    “Alright detectives, we had a break in sometime last night. We don’t have a whole lot to go on. Look for clues and gather evidence. We are going to need a name, the time this happened, how tall the thief is, and how much money was stolen. I’ve faxed over a list of suspects to help you out. If you find out the time of the crime call me back, I will look over the security camera footage. Good luck.”
    “So did you get a time?”
    “Ok, just give me a minute here and I’ll see if the tape shows anything (pause) well I can’t see his face, but the suspect is 6’ 2” tall. I hope that helps. Remember we need to know who it was, and what they stole.”
    “Have you solved the crime yet detectives?”
    “Who was it and how much did they take?”
    “Good work! Why don’t you head on home for the day and rest up.”

    Character Suggestions:

      Creepy Craig Putrid Polly Queasy Quentin Revolting Ralph Rotten Roberta Stinky Stella
    Height 5’4” 5’4” 6’2” 6’2” 5’6” 4’11”
    Weight 209lbs 134lbs 161lbs 206lbs 149lbs 109lbs

    Additional Suggestions:

    Create full RAP sheets for the criminals. Cartoon mug shots can be found online.
    To make this more challenging, add extra steps students will need to solve, such as give suspect height in centimeters on the RAP sheet instead of feet and inches, provide the key for the secret message somewhere else at the crime scene, etc.
    This website will let you create a secret code worksheet:
    http://worksheetgenius.com/design.php?worksheet=codebreaker
    This can be a whole group activity, or each student can work to solve the crime independently; however, the lesson must progress as a group.
    Provide small notebooks for students to record clues.
    Choose a student to be the crime scene photographer and take pictures of clues using an iPad, Blue2, and the camera app.*

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | soundingboard app | math | critical thinking | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  8. World Traveler

    World Traveler

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about other countries and cultures by “traveling around the world.”

    This activity addresses:

    • Geography
    • Social Studies
    • Cause and Effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Sponges
    • Tempera paint
    • Ink pad
    • Glue
    • Craft foam sheets
    • Wood block
    • Passport – (you can find many variations online if you search “kids passport activity” choose one that is suitable for your students)
    • Art materials –(crayons, colored pencils, markers, construction paper, scissors, glue, etc.)
    • Trays/containers (for paint)
    • PowerLink 4
    • Camera/iPad
    • Blue2 Bluetooth switch
    • CD player
    • Hitch 2 (optional)
    • Jelly Bean switch (optional)

    Preparation:

    Create the passports
    1. Take a picture of each student for the passport. Students can assist with this using either:
    The camera app on an iPad/iPod with a Blue2 Bluetooth switch as the shutter button.
    The webcam on a computer with a Hitch 2 set to mouse click and a Jelly Bean switch as the camera shutter.
    2. Print out their picture in a size that will fit in their passport.
    3. Print out a passport for each student.

    What to do:

    Each student, or group of students is assigned a country. Students should create brochures for their country that include information about it: flag, culture, notable landforms and bodies of water, music, history, type of government, money, language, etc.

    Creating your visa
    1. Create a stamp for each country’s unique visa. Stamps can be as simple as the first letter of the country’s name, or students can make their own. Using the foam sheets, have students cut out the stamp designs that will then be glued to the wood blocks.
    2. Using a mixture of 3 to 1 of tempera paint and glue to make “ink” for the stamp. Place a piece of sponge in your paint container and cover it with the “ink” of each country’s stamp.
    3. When tourists come to your country, be sure to stamp their passport!

    Creating your passports
    1. Have students glue their pictures into their passport, then sign and date them. Alternate ways to sign their name could include a name stamp, letter stamp, or digital signature.

    Travel Day
    1. Students can play music for their country. Using a PowerLink 4 and a CD player, have students take turns playing music from their countries.
    2. Presentations can be given to teach the travelers about each country. See Adapted Presentations Remarkable Idea for some tips.

    Script:

    “We will be taking a trip _____ (in the next few days, weeks, months) to various countries around the world to learn about different countries and cultures.”
    “Has anyone ever traveled outside of the country?”
    “There is a special book or document that you need to travel to other countries, does anyone know what this is called?”
    “When you arrive at a country you they give you a visa.”

    Vocabulary:

    Culture – a way of life of a group of people.
    Passport – a form of identification used when traveling to other countries.
    Visa – a stamp or document that allows you to enter or leave a country

    Keywords

    social studies | powerlink 4 | jelly bean switch | hitch | geography | cause and effect | blue2 bluetooth switch | alternative methods of access |

  9. Sensory Monsters

    Sensory Monsters

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will create Halloween themed sensory decorations for your classroom.

    This activity addresses:

    • Choice making
    • Fine Motor
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Clear containers with a lid (mason jars, baby food jars, pasta sauce, plastic water bottles, etc.)
    • Black and white foam or construction paper
    • Warm water
    • School glue
    • Glitter
    • Food coloring- green and orange (mixing red, yellow and blue food coloring to create these colors is fine)
    • Hot Glue Gun
    • Super Glue
    • Battery operated scissors
    • TalkingBrix 2

    Preparation:

    1. Find a picture of a ghost, Frankenstein, and pumpkin.
    2. Create TalkingBrix 2 overlays of a ghost, Frankenstein, and a pumpkin.
    3. Record “Ghost”, “Frankenstein”, and “Pumpkin” onto the TalkingBrix 2 and place the picture with the corresponding TalkingBrix 2.
    4. Clean out the jars you will be using.

    What to do:

    1.Assist students in cutting out the pieces for the Sensory Monster they choose:
    Pumpkin: eyes, nose, and mouth
    Ghost: Eyes, Mouth
    Frankenstein: eyes, pupils, nose, mouth (the eyes should be made out of white foam)
    Stitches (optional)
    2. With assistance from an adult, use the hot glue gun to glue the pieces onto the jar to create the character.
    3. Fill each jar with warm/hot water, leave room for glue.
    4. Allow students to add glue to the jar until the desired consistency is reached or record “More” and “Stop” onto the TalkingBrix 2 so students can tell you when they have enough.
    5. Add food coloring (green for Frankenstein, orange for pumpkin, none for ghost).
    6. Add glitter until you have the look you desire.
    7. An adult should glue the lid onto the jar using either super glue or the hot glue gun to avoid messes later.

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | fine motor skills | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  10. Election Day

    Election Day

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about elections from start to finish by participating in a class or school election.

    This activity addresses:

    • Choice making
    • Social skills
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Box/divider/tri-fold poster for voting booth
    • Craft materials for campaign posters, buttons, etc.
      - construction paper
      - markers
      - glue
      - paper clips
    • Tissue/shoe box for ballot box
    • Note cards for voting ballots
    • Name stamp for each candidate
    • Step-by-Step
    • TalkingBrix 2
    • Battery operated scissors
    • My Art Spinner
    • PowerLink 4
    • Bubble Machine

    Preparation:

    1. Record the steps of an election to a Step-by-Step.
    2. Record the vocabulary word definitions to the TalkingBrix 2.

    What to do:

    1. Designate a “Word Whiz/Word Whizzes” to activate the TalkingBrix 2 for each of the vocabulary words:
    Candidate
    Nominate
    2. Allow students to take turns activating the Step-by-Step to learn about an election.
    3. Tell the class that they are going to participate in their very own (classroom or school) election.
    4. Decide how candidates will be nominated. If more than one classroom is participating in the election, this may be tricky. An alternative to nominating candidates from the class would be to create two characters to act as candidates.
    5. Create campaign materials for each candidate.
    6. Create campaign posters with pictures and slogans using construction paper, markers, My Art Spinner, etc.
    7. Create campaign buttons by decorating button-sized construction paper. Tape a paper clip on the back so supporters can wear them!
    8. Have candidates pass out their campaign materials for supporters to wear.
    9. Allow candidates to choose a position (they can choose to run on a platform for real issues such as going green/alternative fuels, education, creating jobs, etc. or a more fun theme such as a pizza party, ice cream party, etc. Just make sure you come through on this promise or you might have some angry voters!)
    10. Hold a “debate” where students announce their “platforms.”
    Record the “platform” each candidate is running for on the TalkingBrix 2 for each candidate.
    The candidates take turns activating the TalkingBrix 2.
    11. Hold the election.
    Set up a voting booth using a box, tri-fold poster, or divider.
    Place name stamps and next to each candidate's picture in the voting booth.
    Place index cards next to a shoe box or tissue box to collect the votes.
    12. Tally all the votes. When you announce the winner, select someone to activate the radio (with victory music) and Bubble Machine (using the PowerLink 4) for the victory party.

    Script:

    “In order for an election to take place, there needs to be candidates.”
    “Candidates are people who are nominated to participate in the election.”
    “Once a candidate is chosen, they have to campaign for votes. To do this, they make T.V. commercials, make speeches, and do other things so people know they are a candidate.”
    “On election day, all the voters go to their polling place and cast their vote for the candidate of their choice.”
    “After everyone has voted, all the votes are counted.”
    “In a Presidential election, voters elect electors to vote for the president for them.” (optional)
    “The candidate with the most votes wins the election.”
    “A candidate is a person who is trying to be elected.”
    “To nominate means to choose someone as a candidate.”

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | social skills | powerlink 4 | choice making | cause and effect | bubble machine | alternative methods of access |

  11. Pumpkin is a Fruit?

    Pumpkin is a Fruit?

    During the month of October, we use pumpkins for decorations, but what else can we do with pumpkins? In this Remarkable Idea, students learn that a pumpkin is more than just a decoration, it’s a fruit!

    This activity addresses:

    • Plant science
    • Social skills
    • Choice making
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Cookies

    • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
    • 1/2 cup butter (1 stick), softened
    • 1 cup canned pumpkin
    • 1 large egg
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    Glaze

    • 2 cups powdered sugar
    • 3 tablespoons milk
    • 1 tablespoon melted butter
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • Orange food coloring

    Preparation:

    1. Record fruit facts to a Step-by-Step.
    2. Record each definition to the TalkingBrix 2.
    3. Find pictures or play food of fruits and vegetables (common ones and others discussed in this activity)
    4. Attach the fruit and vegetable pictures or manipulatives to the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    5. Preheat oven to 350°

    [su_heading class="small"]What to do:[/su_heading]
    1. Begin by designating a “Word Whiz” to define the vocabulary words.
    2. Introduce the vocabulary words for this activity “fruit” and “vegetable”.
    3. Allow students to take turns activating the Step-by-Step to share the “Fruit Facts” with their classmates.
    4. Tell the class that today you are going to make cookies with a fruit: pumpkin.
    5. Make the cookies, allow students to assist with mixing using the PowerLink 4 and Jelly Bean switch connected to the electric mixer.
    6. Grease the baking sheet.
    7. Combine flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt in a bowl.
    8. Beat sugar and butter in mixer bowl until well blended.
    9. Beat in pumpkin, egg and vanilla extract until smooth. Slowly beat in flour mixture.
    10. Place onto a cookie sheet.
    11. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes or until edges begin to firm.
    12. Allow to cool before drizzling glaze over the top.
    13. To make glaze combine powdered sugar, milk, melted butter, vanilla extract, orange food coloring.
    14. Split the class into teams and allow each team turns to activate the All-Turn-It Spinner. When it lands on a fruit or vegetable that team must answer the question, “Is it a fruit or a vegetable?” If they have trouble you can give them a hint. Example hints: “This part of the plant has seeds.” “This is the leafy part of the plant.”
    15. If keeping score award 2 points for a correct answer, 1 point for a correct answer after a hint has been given.
    16. Take the cookies out of the oven to cool. Once cooled place a sheet of wax paper on a table with a cookie at the center. Put some glaze on a large spoon and allow students to drizzle it over the cookies.

    Script:

    “A fruit is the part of the plant that contains the seeds.”
    “A vegetable is the parts of the plant that do not contain the seeds such as the stem, leaves, roots, and flower buds.”
    “Common fruits are apples, bananas, oranges, and grapes.”
    “Did you know that avocados, beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, and pumpkins are also fruits.”
    “Common vegetables are lettuce, carrots, broccoli, and beets.”

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social skills | plant science | jelly bean switch | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  12. Healthy Hands

    Healthy Hands

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about things they can do to stay healthy and stop spreading germs.

    This activity addresses:

    • Social skills
    • Personal hygiene
    • Cause and Effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Step-by-Step
    • Grass frosting decorating tip
    • Pastry bag
    • Frosting (various colors)
    • Vanilla Wafers

    Preparation:

    1. Record answers for discussion, such as: Wash your hands, cover your mouth when you sneeze preferably with your elbow or shoulder, cover your mouth when you cough, keep things out of your mouth that don’t belong there, don’t eat things off of the floor, table, etc. to the Step-by-Step.
    2. Record steps of “proper hand washing” to the Step-by-Step.
    3. Find pictures/take pictures to match the steps of proper hand washing.

    [su_heading class="small"]What to do:[/su_heading]

    1. Begin by introducing your vocabulary word “germs”.
    2. Ask your students if they can think of some things that we can do to prevent germs from spreading. Students can use theStep-by-Step to get involved in the conversation.

    Proper Hand Washing
    1. Use the Step-by-Step to help students remember the process and a timer for the 20-seconds.
    2. Get your hands wet with clean running water from the sink
    3. Apply soap
    4. Rub you hands together to make bubbles. Make sure to get the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your fingernails.
    5. Wash for at least 20-seconds.
    6. Dry your hands using a clean towel or hand dryer.

    Ingesting Germs
    1. Now that the students know a little about preventing the spread of germs, they get the chance to ingest them.
    2. On the Step-by-Step, record the colors of the frosting you have.
    3. Students press the Step-by-Step, and then decorate their Vanilla Wafer(s) to make their own “germs”. The grass tip will give the appearance of a hairy germ; don’t forget to add the eyes! How many eyes the germs have is up to you.

    Vocabulary:
    1. Germs: a microorganism, or something that is so small you cannot see it without a microscope that can cause you to become sick.

    Additional suggestions:

    These clips from MythBusters show how easy it is to spread germs (warning: each video is preceded by a 30-second advertisement.)
    http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/mythbusters/videos/slow-motion-sneezes/
    http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/mythbusters/videos/flu-fiction-minimyth/

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social skills | personal hygiene | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  13. Talk Like a Pirate Day (September 19th)

    Talk Like a Pirate Day (September 19th)

    Every year on September 19th, people around the world celebrate “International Talk Like A Pirate Day”. This Remarkable Idea includes activities students can participate in and have fun celebrating this wacky day with a wide range of activities that will engage all learners.

    This activity addresses:

    • Team-work
    • Social skills
    • Sensory engagement
    • Cause and effect
    • Following multi-step directions
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Pirate Ships

    • Small milk cartons
    • Straws
    • Hole punch
    • Tape/Glue
    • Construction paper
    • Battery Operated Scissors

    Ship Race

    • Aluminum tray/gutter with end caps/Rubbermaid tub (for racing area)
    • Water
    • Blue food coloring (optional)
    • Fan
    • Jelly Bean
    • PowerLink 4

    Treasure Hunt

    Pirate Parrrty
    Pirate themed snacks could include: Chips Ahoy, Goldfish crackers, Sand buckets (vanilla pudding topped with crushed butter cookies or golden Oreos), gold chocolate coins, seawater (blue or green juice), etc.

    Preparation:

    1. Record clues for the treasure hunt onto the TalkingBrix 2. Place one at the X location on the treasure map which gives students a clue to the next location, place the next TalkingBrix 2 with the next clue at that location (repeat as appropriate).

    What to do:

    Pirate Ships
    1. Have students use the Battery Operated Scissors to cut squares of construction paper for the sails of their pirate ship.
    2. Assist students in cutting one side of the milk carton off.
    3. Glue or tape the straw into the inside of the milk carton, punch two holes into the construction paper sail and slide the paper onto the straw.

    Ship Race
    1. Fill your container with water (optional: add blue food coloring to the water)
    2. Place students pirate ships into the water and give each student a straw to blow their ship across the water or use a fan connected to the PowerLink 4 and a Jelly Bean switch to blow the ship across the water. (Caution: Do not place the fan too close to the water)
    3. Allow all students the opportunity to race each other.

    Treasure Hunt
    1. Show students the treasure map.
    2. Students follow the map to find the location marked by the X on the map.
    3. When students arrive at the X they press the TalkingBrix 2 and hear the clue to the next location (ex. There be no treasure here! That scalawag Mrs. Johnson the Red must have taken it!) Students solve the clue and proceed to the next location.
    4. Students eventually find their way to the location of the treasure.

    Treasure ideas:
    Set up the Pirate Parrrty with food and drinks in your classroom while the students are on the treasure hunt. The final treasure location can be back in your classroom.

    • Prizes or costumes for the students
    • Pirate themed movie
    • Gold chocolate coins

    Additional materials, lesson plans, and even Pirate talk apps can be found at the International Talk Like a Pirate Day website here: http://www.talklikeapirate.com/teachers.html.

    Keywords

    team work | talkingbrix 2 | social skills | sensory | powerlink 4 | jelly bean switch | following directions | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  14. Solar Cooking

    Solar Cooking

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about the power of the sun and use a scientific method to conduct an experiment.

    This activity addresses:

    • Science
    • Choice making
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • TalkingBrix 2
    • Step-by-Step
    • Something to cook in your oven (nachos with shredded cheese, smores, toast, Pop-tarts, etc.) Be cautious when using meat or eggs as they may not cook at a high enough temperature to be safe for consumption.
    • Pizza box
    • Old newspaper
    • Clear packing tape
    • Plastic wrap
    • Aluminum foil
    • Black construction paper

    Optional

  15. Timer
  16. Thermometer
  17. Preparation:

    1. Write your vocabulary words in a place where all students can see them.
    2. Record definitions of “Hypothesis” and “Conclusion” to TalkingBrix 2.
    3. Write the steps of the scientific method onto the board, and record them to a Step-by-Step.
    - Ask a question
    - Construct a hypothesis
    - Test with an experiment
    - Analyze Data and draw a conclusion
    - Communicate the Results
    4. After the vocabulary definitions are no longer needed, record “Correct” and “Incorrect” to the TalkingBrix 2 so students can share their results.

    What to do:

    Test with an experiment
    1. Cut a flap out of the top of the pizza box, leave a “hinge” for the flap. Bend the flap back and cover the inside of the flap with aluminum foil.
    2. Place plastic-wrap across the hole left by the flap on the outside of the box and tape the edges down. You want to make this as airtight as possible.
    3. Place some sheets of newspaper in the bottom of a pizza box and around roll up sheets along the sides for insulation. Cover the newspaper with black construction paper, this will help to absorb heat.

    Cook
    1. Place your chosen food on the black construction paper in the center of the box. (Optional: Place your thermometer in the solar oven). Close the lid (Optional: Start the timer)
    2. Place the solar oven outside in the sun. Use tape to keep the flap open. Position the solar oven so that the aluminum foil can catch the sunlight and reflect it onto the marshmallow.
    3. Place a control food near the solar oven.
    4. Wait. (Optional: Record the temperature at set time intervals.)

    Analyze the Data
    1. Compare the control food and the variable food (you can also take pictures to share later).
    2. Allow the scientists to further analyze the results by eating the food.

    Communicate the results
    1. Each scientist should review the data collected to determine if their hypothesis was correct or incorrect. Students can use the TalkingBrix 2 to communicate their results. (Remind students that having a correct or incorrect hypothesis is neither good nor bad, but part of the scientific process.)
    2. Optional: Chart the progress using the temperature and time data collected.

    Vocabulary:
    Hypothesis
    Conclusion
    Control
    Variable

    Script:

    “The sun’s energy can be converted into heat and electricity. Today, we are going to use the energy from the sun to cook some food.”
    “A hypothesis is an idea that has not been proven but leads to further study.”
    “A conclusion is a decision reached by reason.”

    Additional Suggestions

    This experiment will work better on a day with a high UV index. If you live in the United States, the UV index can be found by using the tool here: http://www2.epa.gov/sunwise/uv-index

Keywords

talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | science | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  • Eating Healthy Foods for a Healthy Lifestyle

    Eating Healthy Foods for a Healthy Lifestyle

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about food groups, empty calories, and some yummy healthy snacks.

    Note: Always be aware of allergies before serving food to your students

    This activity addresses:

    • Health
    • Cause and effect
    • Critical thinking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Smoothie Ingredients

    • Juice (100% fruit, no added sugar)
    • Plain Greek yogurt (no added sugar, and the main ingredients should be milk and live active cultures)
    • Vegetable (Kale or spinach work well)

    Preparation:

    1. Write each of the five food groups (Vegetables, Fruits, Grains, Dairy, Protein) on the All-Turn-It Spinner overlay.
    2. Record at least 2 examples of each food group to the SLITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels. (example: Cereal, toast, strawberries, blueberries, celery, broccoli, chicken, nuts, yogurt, milk)

    What to do:

    Intro:
    Discuss the five major food groups using the real life examples (ex: toy fruits and vegetables, canned fruits and vegetables, cereal boxes, pictures of a gallon of milk, yogurt, etc.). These should be familiar items for your students.

    Ask students for examples of each food groups. Use the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels so all students can participate in the discussion.

    Hands On
    Using the All-Turn-It Spinner and Jelly Bean, have students take turns spinning and giving examples from the group you land on.

    Use the materials you collected for your discussion or have students use the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels.

    Expanded Discussion
    Some students may have given examples of foods earlier in the lesson that do not fit into the five major categories. Discuss fats and oils, as well as empty calories with them.

    Putting this knowledge into practice
    Give examples of some healthy snacks that your students could try at home then make smoothies with them.

    As you add each item to the blender, ask the class which food group that item belongs to. Use the PowerLink 4 to operate the blender.

    Smoothie
    ½-cup yogurt
    1-cup fruit
    ¼-cup juice
    ½-cup vegetable

    Discuss which food groups are missing. (This discussion could be tricky because the yogurt could fit the criteria for two food groups.)

    Enjoy!

    Script:

    Empty calories are foods that don’t provide our bodies with very many nutrients. Some examples of things we might eat or drink that are empty calories are (Soda, candy, cookies, cake, etc.)

    Vocabulary:

    Dairy
    Grain
    Vegetable
    Fruit
    Protein
    Fats & oils
    Empty calories

    Additional suggestions:

    Additional healthy snacks you could use instead of the smoothies:
    Peanut butter and apples
    Low-fat cheese and salt-free pretzel sticks (push the pretzel sticks into cubes of cheese like toothpicks and serve as an Hors D’oeuvre)
    Ants on a log (Celery sticks with peanut butter spread inside, topped with raisins)

    An alternative for the intro activity would be to record the five food groups to TalkingBrix 2 and have students attempt to place the correct TalkingBrix 2 with each food example. You could add a level of difficulty by not telling them which ones are right or wrong and simply telling them they have __ out of 5 correct, they then try to fix their mistakes.

    More information, as well as diet plans for people of all shapes and sizes can be found at http://www.choosemyplate.gov/

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | health | critical thinking | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Mystery Word of the Day

    Mystery Word of the Day

    This is a quick Remarkable Idea you can add to the beginning of your daily routine.

    This activity addresses:

    • Vocabulary
    • Awareness in the classroom
    • Cause and Effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record the word of the day (or week) to the BIGmack.
    2. Record a definition to each of the TalkingBrix 2. One should be the correct definition; the other two should be fake.
    3. Write the word on a note card or write it on a few cards so when students choose a word, they feel like they are choosing from a large group.

    What to do:

    1. When the student pulls the word of the day from the Mystery Container, have them read the word or press the BIGmack.
    2. Use the word in a sentence for the students, and then challenge them to find the correct definition from the three TalkingBrix 2.
    3. Have students activate the TalkingBrix 2, one at a time, so they can hear each definition. Then they must find the correct definition.
    4. For the rest of the day, the students should be Word Detectives. If they hear the word used in class; they cannot use it themselves, they can press the BIGmack to remind the rest of the class what the Mystery Word of the day is. Keep track of which student is the best detective each day; they can be the one to pick the word the following day.

    Additional suggestions:

    If the word warrants it, you can add an action or sound to be used in conjunction with the word.
    Examples:
    -If the word is leap, students can jump when they say it.
    -If the word is onomatopoeia, students can give an example of the definition; Boom.

    Keywords

    vocabulary | talkingbrix 2 | cause and effect | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  • Let's Talk Tarantulas

    Let's Talk Tarantulas

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn some facts about tarantulas and make their own to bring home.

    This activity addresses:

    • Life science
    • Choice making
    • Social skills
    • Fine motor skills
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Step-by-Step
    • TalkingBrix 2
    • 1 1/2-inch Styrofoam balls (2 for each student)
    • Toothpicks
    • White pipe cleaners
    • Shorter pieces of white pipe cleaners
    • Black, brown, and red paint
    • Painting materials (brushes, bowls, plates, locking plastic bags)
    • Pictures of a male and female tarantulas

    Preparation:

    1. Record the definition of “molting” on a TalkingBrix 2.
    2. Record the definition of “exoskeleton” on a TalkingBrix.
    3. Record tarantula facts to the Step-by-Step.
    4. Attach two Styrofoam balls together using a toothpick for each student.

    What to do:

    1. Begin by telling the class that you are going to be discussing and making tarantulas. Give them each a tarantula body to paint either brown or black. Students can paint with a brush, finger paint, roll the balls in paint, or place the body in a locking plastic bag filled with paint and shake it - make sure it’s completely zipped shut before shaking! - and set aside to air dry.
    2. Introduce the two vocabulary words “molting” and “exoskeleton” to the class and select a “Word Whiz” to activate the TalkingBrix 2 to tell the class the definition of each word.
    3. Give each student an opportunity to activate the Step-by-Step to learn different facts about tarantulas and discuss them.
    4. When the vocabulary words appear in the tarantula facts, have your “Word Whiz” activate the TalkingBrix 2 to remind the students of what the new words mean.
    5. Build tarantulas of your own making sure to use the new knowledge of tarantula anatomy. Each spider should have two body parts, eight legs, and two palps.

    • Have students determine based on the color they choose for their tarantula if theirs will be a male or a female spider.
    • Attach four legs to each side of the tarantula. To be anatomically correct, legs should all be attached to one Styrofoam ball.
    • Each student will attach eight legs and two palps to their tarantula.
    • Finish painting the tarantulas. A little red can be added to the males and a little black to the females as accent colors.

    Script:

    Molting definition: “Molting means to lose a covering of hair, feathers, or an old shell, and replace it with a new growth in the same place.”
    Exoskeleton definition: “An exoskeleton is a hard covering that supports and protects the bodies of some types of animals. The word exoskeleton actually means “outside skeleton”.
    “There are around 700 species, or types, of tarantulas.”
    “Tarantulas build their homes underground.”
    “Tarantulas eat insects, grasshoppers, and beetles. Some tarantulas even eat small birds!”
    “Tarantula’s natural enemies are weasels, skunks, snakes, and owls.”
    “One other predator that the tarantula must fear is … people. Some people actually keep tarantulas as pets, and in some countries they even eat them!”
    “Tarantulas have an exoskeleton. This means instead of having bones inside their bodies like people, they have a hard covering on the outside of their bodies. As a tarantula grows, it must molt or shed its exoskeleton.“ (Videos of this can be found online)
    “During a molting phases, a tarantula can even regrow lost legs.”
    “Their life span is up to 30 years for females 5-10 for males.”
    “A tarantula’s body can be up to 4.75 in (12 cm) long and its leg span can be up to 11 in (28 cm).”
    “Tarantulas weigh 1 to 3 oz (28 to 85 g).”
    “A female’s lifespan is up to 30-years, and a male’s lifespan is 5 to 10-years.”
    “A male tarantula is usually thinner than a female and has black and reddish hair.”
    “Tarantulas have two body parts - the cephalothorax and the abdomen, eight legs, and two pedipalps - sometimes called palps for short - that are used for feeling and moving things.”

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | social skills | science | fine motor skills | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  • Hangman Word Game

    Hangman Word Game

    In this Remarkable Idea, students take a spin on the classic game of Hangman by adding an assistive technology component and themes.

    This activity addresses:

    • Spelling
    • Social skills
    • Choice making
    • Cause and effect
    • Fine motor skills
    • Good sportsmanship
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Decide on your theme (decorate a pumpkin, feathers on a turkey, build a snowman, etc.) and the pieces needed (example: pumpkin - nose, mouth, eyes, stem, leaves, etc.)
    2. Record the words you plan to use on your selected communication device (example words: pumpkin, witch, bat, Halloween, etc.)
    3. Write the words you plan to use on strips of construction paper; they should be large enough to read from across the room.

    What to do:

    1. Explain the rules of Hangman so everyone knows how to play.
    - When it is your turn, you get to guess a letter for the puzzle.
    - If you are right, the letter gets added to the word. If you are wrong, the letter is written off to the side and a piece of the character is added.
    2. Each student takes a turn spinning the All-Turn-It Spinner. If it lands on a letter that has already been guessed, the student will spin again.
    3. After a student has taken their turn, they can take a guess at what the word is using the SuperTalker FT / QuickTalker / iPad with SoundingBoard or the strips of paper on the board.
    4. Once the word is solved, begin again until all words are complete.

    Keywords

    supertalker ft | sportsmanship | spelling | soundingboard app | social skills | quicktalker | jelly bean switch | fine motor skills | choice making | cause and effect | blue2 bluetooth switch | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  • Adapted KWL Charts

    Adapted KWL Charts

    In this activity, use this adapted KWL chart to involve all students in the learning process. KWL charts are wonderful tools to use for activating prior knowledge within your students.

    This activity addresses:

    • Critical Thinking
    • Organization
    • Cause and Effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record things that you have previously covered in class on level 1 of your LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels. These will be things that will go in the “K” column.
    2. Record things that you want them to learn from the lesson on level 3 of your LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels. These will be things that will go in the “L” column.
    3. Leave level 2 blank.

    What to do:

    Know
    1. Begin by explaining what a KWL chart is and how to use it, if your students are not familiar with one.
    2. Ask students some questions to fill in the “K” column; allow students to use the SLITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels to get the conversation going. Add incorrect items to challenge their understanding.
    3. List all pertinent suggestions in the “K” column.

    Want to Know
    1. Remind students what the “W” column is used for. As you explain the column, list some things they may want to learn about the subject. As you list them, record them to level 2 of your LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels.
    2. Allow students to suggest items for the “W” column as well as offer the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels to students to facilitate communication. Students can cycle through the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels until they find something they would like to learn about the subject.

    Learned
    1. Ask students to tell you some of the things they learned during the lesson and list these in the “L” column.
    2. Have students use level 3 on the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels to share what they learned. Use the incorrect responses you recorded to clarify information for the students.
    3. When you have finished all three columns, record the “L” column to level 1 on your LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels and you will be one step ahead for your next KWL chart.

    Script:

    “A KWL chart helps us organize our thinking. Each column on the chart has a meaning. The “K” column is where we will list some of the things we know about the subject, the “W” column is where we will list some of the things we want to know, and the “L” column is where we will list some of the things we have learned when we are all done.”

    Additional suggestions:
    Remember, KWL charts don’t need to just be made up of words. Pictures and symbols can be effective tools as well.

    Keywords

    organization | little step-by-step choice with levels | critical thinking | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  • Arctic Exploration

    Arctic Exploration

    In this Remarkable Idea, a sensory-based activity, students will find objects hidden in “snow” that they create from common household objects.

    This activity addresses:

    • Social skills
    • Choice making
    • Cause and effect
    • Fine motor skills
    • Sensory
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Step-by-Step
    • TalkingBrix 2 (2) with "yes" and "no" symbols
    • PowerLink 4
    • Jelly Bean switch
    • Bowl or plastic bin
    • 1kg sodium bicarbonate
    • Approximately 2 cans of shaving cream (not gel)
    • Manipulatives for students to find in the snow (letters, numbers, colored objects, etc.) following multi-step directions

    Preparation:

    1. On the Step-by-Step record all of the objects you plan on placing in the snow.
    2. Record “yes” and “no” on TalkingBrix 2.
    2. Create “yes” and “no” symbol overlays.

    What to do:

    1. Pour 1kg (approximately 7 cups) sodium bicarbonate into a bowl and have a student activate the mixer using the PowerLink 4 and Jelly Bean switch.
    2. Add shaving cream until a snow-like consistency is achieved (approximately 1.5-2 cans).
    3. Transfer the snow from the mixing bowl to the plastic bin and add in your manipulatives.
    4. Students take turns activating the Step-by-Step and finding the object given by the Step-by-Step.
    5. When a student finds an object, they activate the TalkingBrix 2 to answer the question: “Is that what you were looking for?” If it is not what they were looking for, they may look again or another classmate could take a turn looking. Continue until all objects are found.

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | social skills | sensory | powerlink 4 | jelly bean switch | fine motor skills | choice making | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  • Forever Blowing Bubbles

    Forever Blowing Bubbles

    In this Remarkable Idea, students can collaborate and perform a great experiment using bubbles!

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Spatial awareness
    • Working in a group
    • Measuring distances
    • Forces: speed of fan vs. distance traveled
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • BIG or LITTLEmack (with symbol for bubbles)
    • Jelly Beamer and a href="https://www.ablenetinc.com/original-receiver" target="_blank">Original Receiver 2 (one with symbol for fan one with symbol for bubbles)
    • PowerLink 4
    • Bubble machine and bubble solution
    • Symbols for fan and bubbles (2)
    • Electric fan
    • Newspaper
    • Tape measure
    • Something to mark distance labeled 1,2, and 3

    Preparation:

    1. Plug the Bubble machine and fan into the PowerLink 4.
    2. Create bubble and fan symbols.
    3. Link the Original Receiver to the Jelly Beamer transmitters for the Bubble machine and fan plugged in to the PowerLink 4.
    4. Record ‘I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles’ on BIG or LITTLEmack.
    5. Put newspaper on the floor to keep it from getting slippery with bubble solution.

    What to do:

    1. Have the students decide on first setting for fan.
    2. Turn on the Bubble machine.
    3. Turn on the fan.
    4. Have a student play ‘I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles’ on BIG/LITTLEmack.
    5. Let the bubbles blow until the poem is finished.
    6. Record which bubble travels the greatest distance and mark the spot where it lands with the first bubble marker.
    7. Measure the distance from Bubble machine to tin can. This is recorded against the speed setting of the fan.
    8. Repeat process using different speed settings on the fan and different positioning of the Bubble machine.
    9. Re-position the fan angle and speed. Record which fan position and speed has the greatest effect on distance traveled.

    Script:

    Recording of ‘I’m forever blowing bubbles’ into BIG/LITTLEmack.
    “I’m forever blowing bubbles.
    Pretty bubbles in the air.
    They fly so high, nearly reach the sky.
    Then like my dreams, they fade and die.
    Fortune’s always hiding.
    I’ve looked everywhere.
    I’m forever blowing bubbles.
    Pretty bubbles in the air.”

    Keywords

    team work | spatial awareness | shapes | powerlink 4 | numeracy | littlemack | jelly beamer | forces | cause and effect | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  • A Windy Day at the Races

    A Windy Day at the Races

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about wind - what it is and what it feel like. They will compete in relay races taking turns using a switch-activated hair dryer to blow a leaf (or other object) down to the FINISH line.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and Effect
    • Anticipation
    • Group work
    • Turn Taking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Step-by-Step (2)
    • Jelly Beamer
    • PowerLink4
    • “Wind” picture/symbol card
    • Various lightweight objects such as cotton balls, tissue paper, plastic straw, etc.
    • Two plastic/fake leaves
    • Two long tables
    • Hair dryer (2 - each with an extension cord)

    Preparation:

    1. Plug each hair dryer (with extension cord) and Jelly Beamer into the PowerLink4.
    2. On two Step-by-Steps, place a “cheer” picture/symbol and record words of cheer/encouragement such as “Go, go, go!”, “You can do it!”, “Blow that leaf!”, “Don’t give up!”, “You’re doing great!”
    3. Set up the PowerLink4 on or near one of the long tables, and place each hair dryer at the same end of the tables.

    What to do:

    1. Show students the “wind” picture/symbol card.
    2. Explain to students that “wind” is something that we feel, and it’s a type of weather.
    3. Use a hair dryer to have students experience what “wind” feels like.
    4. Put different lightweight objects on the table, and demonstrate how the wind will blow the objects.
    5. Tell students that many times, outside, the wind will blow around leaves.
    6. Show students the two hair dryers and Jelly Beamer. Show them how to activate the switch to turn on the hair dryer and blow a leaf from one end of the table to the next.
    7. Students on each team take turns activating the switch to turn on the hair dryer and blow their leaf from one end of the table to the next and back. A
    8. While a student from each team is blowing the team’s leaf, the other students on that team take turns using a Step-by-Step to cheer on their team member.

    Keywords

    turn taking | team work | step-by-step | powerlink 4 | jelly beamer | cause and effect | anticipation | alternative methods of access |

  • Bowling Fun for All

    Bowling Fun for All

    In the Remarkable Idea, students will have great fun throwing a ball against the bowling pins to knock them down!

    This activity addresses:

    • Turn Taking
    • Numbers
    • Teamwork
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Connect the leaf blower to the PowerLink 4 (have power link set to timed and adjust to suit)
    2. Connect the iTalk2 with Levels to the PowerLink 4.
    3. Record cheering and words of commiseration on the iTalk2 with Levels.
    4. Connect the iTalk2 with Levels to the PowerLink 4.
    5. Record numbers 1-8 on QuickTalker 12.
    6. Create your bowling pin picture symbol for the iTalk2 with Levels, and QuickTalker 12.

    What to do:

    1. Place leaf blower on the floor and place pieces of wood to form a track.
    2. Record numbers 1 to 8 on QuickTalker 12 with overlay showing 1-8 symbols for numbers.
    3. Set bottles/bowling pins.
    4. Place ball near blower and use the iTalk2 with Levels the blower on and BOWL!
    5. Count how many pins were knocked over and press the appropriate number on the QuickTalker 12.
    6. Use the iTalk2 with Levels to either cheer or commiserate depending on the number of pins knocked down.

    Additional ideas:

    Record “Get set and go” on the QuickTalker 12.
    You can record additional phrases like:
    “Wow how many did I get?”
    “That was great, can’t wait for another for another turn”
    “Wow great shot”
    “Ahh, that was close, better luck next time”

    Keywords

    turn taking | team work | quicktalker 12 | powerlink 4 | numbers | italk2 with levels | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  • Staying Warm Like Penguins Do

    Staying Warm Like Penguins Do

    In this Remarkable Idea, students simulate the insulation of a penguin and how they keep warm in the cold. They can then go on to make observations about the outcome and discuss the outcome they observed.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Visual follows
    • Anticipation
    • Group work
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Create two-inch pictures/symbols of “cold” and “no.” Place the pictures/symbols on the iTalk2 with Levels and record “This feels cold” and “No, this does not feel cold” on the respective locations of the iTalk2 with Levels.
    2. Record the science script on the Step-by-Step.

    • “Penguins can stay warm in places that are very cold.”
    • “We are going to do a science experiment to find out how penguins are able to stay warm in very cold temperatures.”
    • “First, we’re going to find out what it feels like when our skin touches ice.”
    • “Everybody, grab a plastic bag, but don’t fill it. Put it on your arm or on your hand.”
    • “Now take a plastic bag that’s filled with ice, and set it on top of the plastic bag on your hand. Does your hand feel cold? Each of you will have a turn to tell the class if your hand feels cold.”
    • “Now we’re going to find out what a penguin feels when it touches the ice.”
    • “Penguins have little straws under their feathers that hold air. We are going to put a bag of air on our hand. Everybody, grab a bag that has air inside, and put it on your skin. Now pick up a bag of ice and set it on the bag filled with air.”
    • “Does your skin feel cold? Everybody will get a turn to tell the class if their skin felt cold or not.”
    • “Our experiment is all done now. Who can remember why penguins stay warm on the ice and in very, very cold weather?”

    3. Fill plastic bags with ice, one bag per student.

    What to do:

    1. Show students the pictures of a penguin and the penguin climate.
    2. Explain that penguins are animals that live where it is very cold all the time.
    3. Ask if anybody knows how penguins are able to keep from freezing in the cold weather.
    4. Reads the science experiment script using the Step-by-Step or follow the instructions of the teacher.
    5. Students place an empty plastic bag on their hand, then a bag of ice on top of that.
    6. Each student uses the iTalk2 with Levels to say if their hand feels cold or not. Explain that this is how our skin feels when it touches ice - ice makes our skin feel cold.
    7. Explain that now they are going to experience what a penguin feels when it touches ice.
    8. Connect the hair dryer, PowerLink and Switch. Use these to blow air into the resealable plastic bag and seal them. Make one for each student.
    9. Place the bag with air inside of it on the back of the students hand. Explains that penguins have little straws under their feathers that keep air inside them, just like the bag keeps air trapped inside of it.
    10. Place a bag of ice on top of the air-filled plastic bag.
    11. Uses the iTalk2 with Levels to say if their hand feels cold or not. Explain that this is how a penguin feels when it’s feathers touch ice.
    12. Explain that the bag with the air in it keeps the cold ice away from our skin, so it does not make our skin feel cold. Remind students that penguins have little straws under their feathers that are like pockets of air that keep the cold away from their skin in the same way.

    Keywords

    visual cues | team work | switches | step-by-step | powerlink 4 | italk2 with levels | cause and effect | anticipation | alternative methods of access |

  • Let's Make Hot Chocolate

    Let's Make Hot Chocolate

    In this Remarkable Idea, students can collaborate to make a delicious hot drink, which they can then go on to drink and share. This task is a great team builder.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Team work
    • Turn taking
    • Social scripts
    • Following directions
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record scripts to SuperTalker FT, iTalk2 with Levels, or Step-by-Step

    • I would like hot chocolate
    • Can you measure the milk and pour it into the container
    • Now we need to heat the milk (NOT TOO HOT!)
    • Now we need to add the chocolate
    • Can you put it in the blender and I’ll turn it on
    • Now let’s serve it to everyone

    If drinks to be offered around then following scripts could be used on a Step-by-Step:

    • Hello, my name is____________ what’s your name?
    • Would you like some hot chocolate
    • We made it ourselves
    • Here you are
    • Is it okay
    • OK thanks bye!

    What to do:

    1. Connect the blender to PowerLink and the PowerLink to Jelly Beamer
    2. Measure and pour milk into microwave safe container
    3. Heat milk to desired heat
    4. Add chocolate powder
    5. Pour chocolate milk in the blender, blend for 1 to 2 minutes.
    6. Add marshmallows
    7. Serve drinks using Step-by-Step to offer drinks.

    Keywords

    turn taking | team work | supertalker ft | step-by-step | powerlink 4 | jelly beamer | italk2 with levels | following directions | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  • Page