critical thinking

  1. Bits and Pieces

    Bits and Pieces

    In this Remarkable Idea, students decipher clues and respond with answers as they prepare for an upcoming test.

    This activity addresses:

    • Study skills
    • Turn taking
    • Critical thinking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Write the names of key people, events, or theories to be studied on the blank side of the large All-Turn-It Spinner overlay.
    2. Write a clue or question pertaining to each of the overlay entries on a sticky note; then cover each item written on the overlay with the note.
    3. Record the answers on the QuickTalker 12 or iPad with SoundingBoard app. You can record more than one answer per question.
    4. Create your symbols.


    What to do:

    1. A student can activate the All-Turn-It Spinner with the Jelly Bean switch to randomly choose a clue or question.
    2. When the All-Turn-It Spinner stops, read the clue written on the sticky note. The student then identifies the item he or she thinks it pertains to using the QuickTalker 12 or iPad with SoundingBoard app to reveal the answer.
    3. Students take turns reading clues and providing correct answers.
    4. When a clue is chosen a second time, students can add new information to what has already been revealed and take another spin.


    Additional suggestions:

    Use this activity for independent or small group study activities.
    Use a team format, dividing the class into two groups for friendly competition. Assign a number to each team and write the numbers on the small, blank overlay. Randomly select the group to respond with a spin of the All-Turn-It Spinner.

    Keywords

    turn taking | study skills | quicktalker 12 | jelly bean switch | critical thinking | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  2. Math Mystery

    Math Mystery

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will use various math skills to solve a crime.

    This activity addresses:

    • Critical thinking
    • Math
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Cardboard box (for the safe)
    • Crime scene tape/crepe paper
    • Analog Clock (teaching clock, real clock, etc.)
    • Step-by-Step
    • iPad with SoundingBoard
    • TalkingBrix 2
    • Calculator
    • Various crime scene things (anything that can be placed at the crime scene to throw off your detectives)

    Preparation:

    1. Create a secret code worksheet. How the message is coded is up to you, some options include (numerical codes, transportation codes, solve the equation codes, etc.). An example message would be: To: RR, The safe is in Mrs. Swenson’s classroom. Signed, PP. Students will use this information to narrow down their suspects.
    2. Set the clock to 3:15.
    3. Record times to the TalkingBrix 2 for students to choose from.
    4. Record the script to the Step-by-Step.
    5. Print out or write on a white board the information of the 6 suspects. Students can cross off suspects that don’t fit the crime.

    What to do:

    The students will see the crime scene and must collect clues to solve the crime. Have a student activate the Step-by-Step to contact the police chief, he will give the detectives some information (you may wish to write down the 4 things he/she mentions to look for). As students progress through the activity, they will check in with him/her.

    Secret Message
    At the crime scene, there will be a crumpled up piece of paper with a message. For example: RR, The safe is in Mrs. Swenson’s class. PP
    The students must solve this piece of the puzzle to get the initials of the person in the letter.

    Broken Clock
    At the crime scene, there will be a broken clock that reads 3:15. The time on this clock is important because it will help the security guard look at the right time on the security camera.
    Students can use the TalkingBrix 2 to choose the correct time from a field of three.
    *Check in with the Police Chief with the time from the clock.*
    When the security guard checks the tape, he will see that the suspect is 6’2”.

    What was stolen?
    Left over in the safe is $13.57. The safe originally had $160.00 in it, how much was stolen? Students can use calculators or the SoundingBoard app to answer.
    *Check in with the Police Chief.*

    Script:

    “Alright detectives, we had a break in sometime last night. We don’t have a whole lot to go on. Look for clues and gather evidence. We are going to need a name, the time this happened, how tall the thief is, and how much money was stolen. I’ve faxed over a list of suspects to help you out. If you find out the time of the crime call me back, I will look over the security camera footage. Good luck.”
    “So did you get a time?”
    “Ok, just give me a minute here and I’ll see if the tape shows anything (pause) well I can’t see his face, but the suspect is 6’ 2” tall. I hope that helps. Remember we need to know who it was, and what they stole.”
    “Have you solved the crime yet detectives?”
    “Who was it and how much did they take?”
    “Good work! Why don’t you head on home for the day and rest up.”

    Character Suggestions:

      Creepy Craig Putrid Polly Queasy Quentin Revolting Ralph Rotten Roberta Stinky Stella
    Height 5’4” 5’4” 6’2” 6’2” 5’6” 4’11”
    Weight 209lbs 134lbs 161lbs 206lbs 149lbs 109lbs

    Additional Suggestions:

    Create full RAP sheets for the criminals. Cartoon mug shots can be found online.
    To make this more challenging, add extra steps students will need to solve, such as give suspect height in centimeters on the RAP sheet instead of feet and inches, provide the key for the secret message somewhere else at the crime scene, etc.
    This website will let you create a secret code worksheet:
    http://worksheetgenius.com/design.php?worksheet=codebreaker
    This can be a whole group activity, or each student can work to solve the crime independently; however, the lesson must progress as a group.
    Provide small notebooks for students to record clues.
    Choose a student to be the crime scene photographer and take pictures of clues using an iPad, Blue2, and the camera app.*

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | soundingboard app | math | critical thinking | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  3. Old Time Radio

    Old Time Radio

    Podcasts are a popular media in today’s society, but they are certainly not a new concept. In this Remarkable Idea, your students will create their own radio show or podcast.

    This activity addresses:

    • Communication skills
    • Technology
    • Teamwork
    • Critical thinking
    • Creative thinking
    • Fine motor skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Optional Hardware

    • Microphone

    Free Resources

    • Sound Effects – YouTube or BoundBible.com (There are a lot of other sites, just be sure they are free. Sound effects can be expensive!)
    • Software – AudacityTeam.org (free audio recording/editing program)
    • Archive.org – listen to old radio plays (you can also search the internet for “old time radio”)
    • iTunes store/Stitcher.com – download/listen to free podcasts
    • genericradio.com – (free radio play scripts)

    Preparation:

    1. Decide on a format (Radio play, top ten music countdown, news show, talk radio, movie/book review, etc.) for your radio show, or a script from a radio play that is appropriate for your classroom and students. If you choose to come up with an original radio play, decide on some appropriate themes or settings for your students.
    2. Download “Audacity” from AudacityTeam.org to record and edit your radio show.
    3. Find some appropriate podcasts/radio shows for your students to listen to. This will give them an idea of what your lesson is all about.
    4. If you have a radio play in mind, you may wish to gather your sound effects and record them to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    5. Record the shows music intro to a BIGmack
    6. Record sound effects to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    7. Set up Audacity to record with the Hitch 2 and two Jelly Bean switches.

    • Open Audacity and go to preferences > keyboard
    • Change the shortcut for “Record” from the letter “R” to the number 0
    • Change the shortcuts for “Stop” and “Play” from the space bar to the number 3 (they share a shortcut)

    8. Plug in your Hitch 2 and Jelly Bean switches so the Recording Engineer can control the recording.

    What to do:

    1. Begin by discussing the history of home entertainment (video games, TV, radio, etc.)
    2. Play some examples of old radio shows. Ask the class if they know anything that is popular now that is similar; discuss podcasts.
    3. Play an example of a podcast.
    4. Assign roles to students and give them scripts (be sure to add symbols and marks so students know when it’s their turn to talk or to use a particular sound effect):

    • Recording engineer (the person who presses record and stop)
    • Sound designers/sound effect specialists (they will choose sound effects and add them to the show when necessary)
    • Actors/DJs/Show hosts
    • Writers (if applicable, maybe all students will be writers, maybe you will not have any writers)

    5. Record the shows music intro to a BIGmack
    6. Record sound effects to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    7. Do a read-through with your class so they can practice reading and using sound effects/music at the right time. (You may wish to record the rehearsal).
    8. On the Air! Record your show (you may need to record multiple times to get everything right.)
    9. Edit the show - you may wish to do this together as a class and ask their opinions. Do you need more/different sound effects or music? More commercials, less commercials? etc.
    10. Once you have a finished product, “export” your project from Audacity and allow your class to listen to their radio show.

    Script:

    “What are some things you like to do for fun when you’re at home?” Someone will inevitably say watch movies, TV, or play video games.
    “Before video games and television, people used to listen to the radio for fun. There used to be shows, kind of like the ones on TV that you would listen to and mentally picture.”
    “Podcasts are like radio shows that you can listen to whenever you like. They do not have a set time limit.”
    “We are going to be creating our very own radio show or podcast in our class.”

    Vocabulary:

    Podcast
    Soundscape

    Additional suggestions:

    To make recording easier for your and your students, consider recording everything separately and combining it later.
    - Record commercials in advance.
    - Record dialogue, sound effects, and music separately.
    Most if not all laptops have a built-in microphone or webcam. You can use this to record your show (Audacity will allow you to import audio from a video) or you can use an external microphone.
    Burn a copy of the radio show to a disc or distribute them digitally so your students can share the show with their families.

    Keywords

    technology | team work | talktrac | talkingbrix 2 | supertalker ft | quicktalker freestyle | quicktalker 7 | quicktalker 23 | quicktalker 12 | jelly bean switch | hitch | critical thinking | creative thinking | communication skills | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  4. Sensing Patterns

    Sensing Patterns

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will explore patterns using senses other than sight.

    This activity addresses:

    • Patterning skills
    • Five senses
    • Critical thinking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • TalkingBrix 2
    • Step-by-Step
    • Cards/pictures to identify each TalkingBrix 2 (labeled AB pattern, ABB pattern, ABC pattern)
    • Cardstock
    • Glue
    • Sandpaper
    • Foam pool noodles
    • Utility knife
    • Various candies/food – (jellybeans, M&Ms, Reeses Pieces, Skittles, Fruit cut into small pieces, etc)
    • Small containers/paper cups
    • Acrylic Jars .20oz
    • Various extracts (vanilla, cinnamon, coconut, lemon, etc.)
    • Various herbs/spices
    • Cotton balls
    • Instruments
    • Animal sounds
    • Letter sounds
    • Something to tap a pattern with (pen, ruler, drum stick, etc.)

    Preparation:

    1. Create your TalkingBrix 2 identification cards.

    Touch/Feel
    1. Cut a piece of cardstock in half so you have two pieces that are 8.5” x 5.5”.
    2. Cut 3 small squares out of the sandpaper.
    3. Glue sandpaper onto the cardstock, leave spaces for the other unit (sandpaper, blank space, sandpaper, blank space, etc.). A small line of glue can be placed and allowed to dry between each unit to denote each unit.
    4. Create more cards using different textures (aluminum foil, felt, dried glue, different types of paper, etc.)
    5. Label cards AB pattern, ABB pattern, ABC pattern
    6. Cut the pool noodles in half lengthwise (you should have two semi-cylinders)

    Taste
    1. Cut up small pieces of fruit or other foods you wish to use.
    2. Place into small cups/containers

    Smell
    1. Place a cotton ball into each jar and add a few drops of the extract of your choice. (Add more drops to increase the strength of each fragrance).
    2. You may wish to mark the bottom of the jars for easy identification later.

    Hearing
    1. Record a pattern to the Step-by-Step using animal sounds, letter sounds, or a simple sound (example: the sound of a Morse code).

    What to do:

    Touch/Feel
    1. Allow students to feel the pattern cards (you may wish to have them close their eyes!).
    - Once the student has had a chance to feel their card, challenge them to identify the type of pattern: AB, ABB, or ABC.
    - Students may use TalkingBrix 2 to assist in identifying the pattern.
    2. Place the semi-cylinder pool noodles on the floor in a pattern (Example: 1 by itself, 2 close together, 1 by itself, etc.)
    - Students each take a turn rolling over the pool noodles.
    - Once the student has had a chance to roll over the pattern, challenge them to identify the type of pattern: AB, ABB, or ABC.
    - Students may use TalkingBrix 2 to assist in identifying the pattern.

    Taste
    **ALWAYS BE AWARE OF ALLERGIES BEFORE ALLOWING STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS ACTIVITY.
    1. Organize the cups/containers of food/candy into a simple pattern. (Example: M & M, Reeses Piece, M & M, Reeses Piece.)
    2. Have the student close their eyes then hand them the cups for their pattern one at a time.
    3. They taste each cup until the pattern is finished.
    4. Ask them to identify the type of pattern: AB, ABB, or ABC that you created with the food/candy. Students may use TalkingBrix 2 to assist in identifying the pattern.

    Smell
    **ALWAYS BE AWARE OF ALLERGIES BEFORE ALLOWING STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS ACTIVITY.
    1. Ask the student to close their eyes (so they can’t see the pattern) and have them smell 4-6 (depending on the pattern) smelling jars. (Example: vanilla, peppermint, vanilla, peppermint.)
    2. Ask them to identify the type of pattern: AB, ABB, or ABC that you created with smelling jars. Students may use TalkingBrix 2 to assist in identifying the pattern.

    Hearing
    1. Have students activate the Step-by-Step and ask them to identify the pattern that they hear. Students may use TalkingBrix 2 to assist in identifying the pattern.

    Vocabulary:

    AB pattern
    ABB pattern
    ABC pattern

    Additional suggestions:

    For the Hearing patterns section, if you choose particular sounds to use (animals, letter, etc.) you can ask them identify what they heard in addition to the pattern.

    Also for the hearing patterns section this could be a nice intro to learning about Morse code and the complex patterns that make up this form of communication.

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | sensory | patterns | critical thinking | alternative methods of access |

  5. Eating Healthy Foods for a Healthy Lifestyle

    Eating Healthy Foods for a Healthy Lifestyle

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about food groups, empty calories, and some yummy healthy snacks.

    Note: Always be aware of allergies before serving food to your students

    This activity addresses:

    • Health
    • Cause and effect
    • Critical thinking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Smoothie Ingredients

    • Juice (100% fruit, no added sugar)
    • Plain Greek yogurt (no added sugar, and the main ingredients should be milk and live active cultures)
    • Vegetable (Kale or spinach work well)

    Preparation:

    1. Write each of the five food groups (Vegetables, Fruits, Grains, Dairy, Protein) on the All-Turn-It Spinner overlay.
    2. Record at least 2 examples of each food group to the SLITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels. (example: Cereal, toast, strawberries, blueberries, celery, broccoli, chicken, nuts, yogurt, milk)

    What to do:

    Intro:
    Discuss the five major food groups using the real life examples (ex: toy fruits and vegetables, canned fruits and vegetables, cereal boxes, pictures of a gallon of milk, yogurt, etc.). These should be familiar items for your students.

    Ask students for examples of each food groups. Use the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels so all students can participate in the discussion.

    Hands On
    Using the All-Turn-It Spinner and Jelly Bean, have students take turns spinning and giving examples from the group you land on.

    Use the materials you collected for your discussion or have students use the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels.

    Expanded Discussion
    Some students may have given examples of foods earlier in the lesson that do not fit into the five major categories. Discuss fats and oils, as well as empty calories with them.

    Putting this knowledge into practice
    Give examples of some healthy snacks that your students could try at home then make smoothies with them.

    As you add each item to the blender, ask the class which food group that item belongs to. Use the PowerLink 4 to operate the blender.

    Smoothie
    ½-cup yogurt
    1-cup fruit
    ¼-cup juice
    ½-cup vegetable

    Discuss which food groups are missing. (This discussion could be tricky because the yogurt could fit the criteria for two food groups.)

    Enjoy!

    Script:

    Empty calories are foods that don’t provide our bodies with very many nutrients. Some examples of things we might eat or drink that are empty calories are (Soda, candy, cookies, cake, etc.)

    Vocabulary:

    Dairy
    Grain
    Vegetable
    Fruit
    Protein
    Fats & oils
    Empty calories

    Additional suggestions:

    Additional healthy snacks you could use instead of the smoothies:
    Peanut butter and apples
    Low-fat cheese and salt-free pretzel sticks (push the pretzel sticks into cubes of cheese like toothpicks and serve as an Hors D’oeuvre)
    Ants on a log (Celery sticks with peanut butter spread inside, topped with raisins)

    An alternative for the intro activity would be to record the five food groups to TalkingBrix 2 and have students attempt to place the correct TalkingBrix 2 with each food example. You could add a level of difficulty by not telling them which ones are right or wrong and simply telling them they have __ out of 5 correct, they then try to fix their mistakes.

    More information, as well as diet plans for people of all shapes and sizes can be found at http://www.choosemyplate.gov/

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | health | critical thinking | cause and effect | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  6. Mystery Boxes

    Mystery Boxes

    In this Remarkable Idea students will be challenged to feel disgusting items in the mystery boxes and determine what everyday items are inside. The reward for completing this challenge is a meal made of dirt and worms!

    This activity addresses:

  7. Critical thinking
  8. Choice making
  9. Sensory
  10. Fine motor skills
  11. Alternative methods of access
  12. What you need:

    • Jelly Bean
    • TalkingBrix 2
    • PowerLink 4
    • Mystery boxes
      Boxes or containers students cannot see inside of, such as tissue boxes, bowls with a box placed over the top, etc.
      Pictures/labels of the “disgusting” objects inside
      Pictures/labels of the actual objects inside
    • Mystery Box Contents – (These are just some examples)
      Pistachio shells – Fingernails
      Pistachio pudding with mini marshmallows – Boogers
      Grapes (peeled preferably) – Eyeballs
      Baby carrots/little sausages – Fingers
      Baby dill pickles – Witches fingers
      Jello – Brains
      Peeled tomato – Heart
      Cooked Spaghetti – Worms
    • Dirt & Worms
      1-package of instant chocolate pudding
      2-cups of milk
      1-tub (8 oz.) of Cool Whip
      15 chocolate sandwich cookies
      Gummy worms
      Locking plastic bag
      Spoon
      Electric Mixer

    Preparation:

    1. Place all the food into the containers so students cannot see what is in them.
    2. Place the “disgusting” item cards on the outside of the containers.
    3. Record “I want to touch it” and “No way!” onto the TalkingBrix 2.

    What to do:

    1. Combine pudding mix and milk into a large bowl. Have a student activate the mixer using the Jelly Bean and PowerLink 4 and whisk for 2-minutes, then let stand for 5-minutes.
    2. Crush 8 chocolate sandwich cookies in a locking plastic bag.
    3. Stir Cool Whip and cookie crumbs into mixture.
    4. Using a spoon, scoop the mixture into cups and refrigerate for 1-hour.
    5. Crush remaining cookies and add to the top of the cups along with gummy worms just before serving.
    6. Allow each student the opportunity to take turns feeling what is inside each container. They will use the TalkingBrix 2 to say “I want to touch it” or “No way!”
    7. Once a student has felt what is inside, allow them guess what they are actually feeling.
    Let them choose from the “actual item” cards and match them to the containers.
    8. At the end of the activity, students can be rewarded for being adventurous enough to feel what was inside the boxes by eating dirt!

Keywords

talkingbrix 2 | sensory | powerlink 4 | jelly bean switch | fine motor skills | critical thinking | choice making | alternative methods of access |

  • Adapted KWL Charts

    Adapted KWL Charts

    In this activity, use this adapted KWL chart to involve all students in the learning process. KWL charts are wonderful tools to use for activating prior knowledge within your students.

    This activity addresses:

    • Critical Thinking
    • Organization
    • Cause and Effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record things that you have previously covered in class on level 1 of your LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels. These will be things that will go in the “K” column.
    2. Record things that you want them to learn from the lesson on level 3 of your LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels. These will be things that will go in the “L” column.
    3. Leave level 2 blank.

    What to do:

    Know
    1. Begin by explaining what a KWL chart is and how to use it, if your students are not familiar with one.
    2. Ask students some questions to fill in the “K” column; allow students to use the SLITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels to get the conversation going. Add incorrect items to challenge their understanding.
    3. List all pertinent suggestions in the “K” column.

    Want to Know
    1. Remind students what the “W” column is used for. As you explain the column, list some things they may want to learn about the subject. As you list them, record them to level 2 of your LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels.
    2. Allow students to suggest items for the “W” column as well as offer the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels to students to facilitate communication. Students can cycle through the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels until they find something they would like to learn about the subject.

    Learned
    1. Ask students to tell you some of the things they learned during the lesson and list these in the “L” column.
    2. Have students use level 3 on the LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels to share what they learned. Use the incorrect responses you recorded to clarify information for the students.
    3. When you have finished all three columns, record the “L” column to level 1 on your LITTLE Step-by-Step Choice with Levels and you will be one step ahead for your next KWL chart.

    Script:

    “A KWL chart helps us organize our thinking. Each column on the chart has a meaning. The “K” column is where we will list some of the things we know about the subject, the “W” column is where we will list some of the things we want to know, and the “L” column is where we will list some of the things we have learned when we are all done.”

    Additional suggestions:
    Remember, KWL charts don’t need to just be made up of words. Pictures and symbols can be effective tools as well.

    Keywords

    organization | little step-by-step choice with levels | critical thinking | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  • Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle for Earth Day

    Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle for Earth Day

    In this Remarkable Idea, we learn about, and practice these three things to help protect the environment.

    This activity addresses:

    • Critical Thinking
    • Social skills
    • Fine Motor
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • TalkingBrix 2
    • Stickers or labels reminding everyone to turn things off if not needed (you can make your own, or free stickers can be downloaded and printed from here: http://www.carbontrust.com/resources/guides/energy-efficiency/employee-awareness-and-office-energyefficiency#posters)
    • Glass, plastic, paper, and aluminum items (actual items or pictures on a tablet to reduce printing)
    • Silicone mold (any shape you desire, can be found at craft stores)
    • Old broken crayons/crayon pieces
    • Construction paper
    • Old scrap paper
    • School glue
    • Plastic wrap
    • Shredder
    • Ceramic bowls (that you don’t mind being without for a few days)

    Preparation:

    1. Print stickers or labels
    2. Record “green”, “purple”, and “orange” to TalkingBrix 2.
    3. Record categories to TalkingBrix 2 for your sorting game (glass, plastic, paper, aluminum). To make the game simpler use categories (recyclable and non-recyclable).
    4. Shred paper, keep shreds.

    What to do:

    Label the Areas We Can Reduce
    1. Working together as a class, find things in the classroom where we can reduce usage (shut computer off when not in use, turn off faucet if not in use, etc.)
    2. Place appropriate label or sticker on or near items.

    Repurposed Crayons and Paper

    Crayons
    1. Have students gather broken crayon pieces and sort them into piles of the same color.
    2. Ask students what color they would make when they combine (red/blue, yellow/blue, red/yellow).
    Students can use TalkingBrix 2 to answer.
    3. Place crayon pieces of the same color into the silicone mold, place into a preheated oven (230 degrees) and bake for 15-minutes. Remove crayons from oven and allow to cool. Remove your new crayons from the mold.

    Paper
    1. Wrap a ceramic bowl with plastic wrap and place face down on the table.
    2. Using a lot of glue (the more the better), smear glue on the plastic wrap then place the paper scraps on top of the glue and press into place until the entire bowl is covered. Allow to dry for 2 to 3 days.
    3. When dry, turn the bowl over and peel off the plastic wrap and remove your new paper bowl from the ceramic bowl. Trim the edges for a smooth edge.

    Recycle Game
    1. Using actual objects (or pictures on an iPad or tablet to reduce printing) challenge students to determine if an object is recyclable or non-recyclable. Students can answer using the TalkingBrix 2.
    2. For a more difficult game, challenge students to tell what an item is made out of (glass, plastic, paper, or aluminum) using the TalkingBrix 2.
    3. Give all students a turn or split the class into teams for an Earth Day game.

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | social skills | fine motor skills | critical thinking | alternative methods of access |