famous americans

  1. George Washington - I Cannot Tell a Lie

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about George Washington and that he always tried to tell the truth. Learn about the difference between a truth and a lie.

    This activity addresses:

    • Language arts
    • Famous Americans
    • Social Studies
    • Choice making
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. On a Step-by-Step record the list of “Statements - True or False?
    2. Create a picture symbol for the words - sentence, yes, and no.
    3. Write each statement on a sentence strip.
    NOTE: These are examples of statements you can use. Add your own statements that relate more closely to your classroom and students.
    4. On the iTalk2 with Levels, place “yes” and “no” picture symbols, one on each side. On the “yes” message location, record the sentence, “Yes, that is true” and on the “no” message location record the sentence, “No, that is not true. It is is a lie.”

    What to do:

    1. Show students the pictures, and/or book, about George Washington.
    2. Explain that George Washington believed in always telling the truth and that he was very careful to not tell lies.
    3. Discuss with students the difference between a truth and a lie.
    4. Show students the iTalk2 with Levels and how to activate the “yes” picture/symbol to say “Yes, that is true” and the “no” picture/symbol to say, “No, that is not true. It is a lie.”
    5. Read several statements to students, one at a time.
    6. Students take turns reading a statement on a sentence strip, or using the Step-by-Step to read a statement.
    7. The student who read the statement uses the iTalk2 with Levels to say either “yes, that is true” or “no, that is not true.”
    8. The teacher confirms or redirects the student’s choice, and explains why the statement is either the truth or a lie.

    True or False Statements:
    1. We have a pet kangaroo in our classroom.
    2. The lunchroom will be serving alligator soup for lunch.
    3. We use scissors to cut paper.
    4. Books are things that we read.
    5. Our teacher’s name is (Mrs. Henrietta Hummingsworth).
    6. All the students in our class are wearing blue jeans today.
    7. We are at school today.
    8. We will leave school at 8:00 tonight.
    9. Today is (Tuesday).
    10. It snows in the summer.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social studies | language arts | italk2 with levels | famous americans | choice making | alternative methods of access |

  2. Fire at These Coordinates

    Fire at These Coordinates

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will work on plotting points on a graph, and eventually determining the slope of a line from two points on a graph.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Critical thinking
    • Math
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record the word “negative” to the TalkingBrix 2
    2. Record “Y =” to the TalkingBrix 2
    3. Record the numbers 0-5 on the Step-by-Step


    What to do:

    Level 1
    In this level, students are trying to sink ships that exist in either perpendicular or horizontal line segments.
    1. Each student will get a small piece of graph paper. The “target area” should be 5 points in each direction (100 possible coordinates).
    2. Place a divider between students if they are seated near each other.
    3. Students begin by placing their ships in either 2 dot line segment, 3 dot line segment, and 4 dot line segment. Students can use the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-Step to assist with placement by giving coordinates (ex. the coordinate (-3,2) would be given by hitting the TalkingBrix 2 to say the number is negative, then step through the Step-by-Step until the number 3 is reached. For the number 2, the student will cycle through the Step-by-Step until they come to the number 2.)
    4. Begin the assault. Each student takes a turn choosing a coordinate to attack. Students use the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-Step to give coordinates.
    5. Students continue to guess coordinates until all of the ships have been sunk. The ships must be hit on all of their points to sink.


    Level 2

    In this level, students are trying to sink one ship that exists in a diagonal, horizontal, or vertical line.
    1. In order to win, the students must give the slope-intercept formula for the line. The slope of the lines should be limited to a numerator/denominator no greater/less than (-)2 or (-)3 or the game could last extremely long.
    2. Each student will get a small piece of graph paper. The “target area” is should be 5 points in each direction (100 possible coordinates).
    3. Place a divider between students if they are seated near each other.
    4. Students begin by placing their ship (1 line, slope numerator/denominator no greater than (-)2 or (-)3.) Students can use the TalkingBrixand Step-by-Step to assist with placement by giving coordinates (at least 2 from their line) or they can give their equation using the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-step.
    Example: y = ½ - 3 would be:
    TalkingBrix 2: Y=
    Step-by-Step: 1
    Step-by-Step: 2
    TalkingBrix 2: negative
    Step-by-Stepp: 3
    5. Begin the assault. Each student takes a turn choosing a coordinate to attack. Students use the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-Step to give coordinates.
    6. Students continue to guess coordinate until one of them thinks they have found their opponents line and can give it in slope-intercept form. To initiate this process they will hit the “Y =” TalkingBrix 2. If the student is incorrect they lose a turn, if they are correct the game is over.


    Tips to speed up games:
    Tell each student which quadrants are empty on their opponents graphs (mention this may happen before the game begins, it may change their strategy). You do not have to tell students which quadrant is which (they should already know that anyway).

    You may wish to make one hit on a ship be enough to sink it.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social studies | language arts | italk2 with levels | famous americans | choice making | alternative methods of access |