language arts

  1. George Washington - I Cannot Tell a Lie

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about George Washington and that he always tried to tell the truth. Learn about the difference between a truth and a lie.

    This activity addresses:

    • Language arts
    • Famous Americans
    • Social Studies
    • Choice making
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. On a Step-by-Step record the list of “Statements - True or False?
    2. Create a picture symbol for the words - sentence, yes, and no.
    3. Write each statement on a sentence strip.
    NOTE: These are examples of statements you can use. Add your own statements that relate more closely to your classroom and students.
    4. On the iTalk2 with Levels, place “yes” and “no” picture symbols, one on each side. On the “yes” message location, record the sentence, “Yes, that is true” and on the “no” message location record the sentence, “No, that is not true. It is is a lie.”

    What to do:

    1. Show students the pictures, and/or book, about George Washington.
    2. Explain that George Washington believed in always telling the truth and that he was very careful to not tell lies.
    3. Discuss with students the difference between a truth and a lie.
    4. Show students the iTalk2 with Levels and how to activate the “yes” picture/symbol to say “Yes, that is true” and the “no” picture/symbol to say, “No, that is not true. It is a lie.”
    5. Read several statements to students, one at a time.
    6. Students take turns reading a statement on a sentence strip, or using the Step-by-Step to read a statement.
    7. The student who read the statement uses the iTalk2 with Levels to say either “yes, that is true” or “no, that is not true.”
    8. The teacher confirms or redirects the student’s choice, and explains why the statement is either the truth or a lie.

    True or False Statements:
    1. We have a pet kangaroo in our classroom.
    2. The lunchroom will be serving alligator soup for lunch.
    3. We use scissors to cut paper.
    4. Books are things that we read.
    5. Our teacher’s name is (Mrs. Henrietta Hummingsworth).
    6. All the students in our class are wearing blue jeans today.
    7. We are at school today.
    8. We will leave school at 8:00 tonight.
    9. Today is (Tuesday).
    10. It snows in the summer.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social studies | language arts | italk2 with levels | famous americans | choice making | alternative methods of access |

  2. Fire at These Coordinates

    Fire at These Coordinates

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will work on plotting points on a graph, and eventually determining the slope of a line from two points on a graph.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Critical thinking
    • Math
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record the word “negative” to the TalkingBrix 2
    2. Record “Y =” to the TalkingBrix 2
    3. Record the numbers 0-5 on the Step-by-Step


    What to do:

    Level 1
    In this level, students are trying to sink ships that exist in either perpendicular or horizontal line segments.
    1. Each student will get a small piece of graph paper. The “target area” should be 5 points in each direction (100 possible coordinates).
    2. Place a divider between students if they are seated near each other.
    3. Students begin by placing their ships in either 2 dot line segment, 3 dot line segment, and 4 dot line segment. Students can use the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-Step to assist with placement by giving coordinates (ex. the coordinate (-3,2) would be given by hitting the TalkingBrix 2 to say the number is negative, then step through the Step-by-Step until the number 3 is reached. For the number 2, the student will cycle through the Step-by-Step until they come to the number 2.)
    4. Begin the assault. Each student takes a turn choosing a coordinate to attack. Students use the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-Step to give coordinates.
    5. Students continue to guess coordinates until all of the ships have been sunk. The ships must be hit on all of their points to sink.


    Level 2

    In this level, students are trying to sink one ship that exists in a diagonal, horizontal, or vertical line.
    1. In order to win, the students must give the slope-intercept formula for the line. The slope of the lines should be limited to a numerator/denominator no greater/less than (-)2 or (-)3 or the game could last extremely long.
    2. Each student will get a small piece of graph paper. The “target area” is should be 5 points in each direction (100 possible coordinates).
    3. Place a divider between students if they are seated near each other.
    4. Students begin by placing their ship (1 line, slope numerator/denominator no greater than (-)2 or (-)3.) Students can use the TalkingBrixand Step-by-Step to assist with placement by giving coordinates (at least 2 from their line) or they can give their equation using the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-step.
    Example: y = ½ - 3 would be:
    TalkingBrix 2: Y=
    Step-by-Step: 1
    Step-by-Step: 2
    TalkingBrix 2: negative
    Step-by-Stepp: 3
    5. Begin the assault. Each student takes a turn choosing a coordinate to attack. Students use the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-Step to give coordinates.
    6. Students continue to guess coordinate until one of them thinks they have found their opponents line and can give it in slope-intercept form. To initiate this process they will hit the “Y =” TalkingBrix 2. If the student is incorrect they lose a turn, if they are correct the game is over.


    Tips to speed up games:
    Tell each student which quadrants are empty on their opponents graphs (mention this may happen before the game begins, it may change their strategy). You do not have to tell students which quadrant is which (they should already know that anyway).

    You may wish to make one hit on a ship be enough to sink it.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social studies | language arts | italk2 with levels | famous americans | choice making | alternative methods of access |

  3. Food Groups Categorizing Activity

    Food Groups Categorizing Activity

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about or review the food groups, and the types of foods that fit into each group. Students cut out pictures of foods from magazines, then select the food group that the food fits in. Students glue the food picture on a poster labeled with the corresponding food group name and/or picture/symbol.

    This activity addresses:

    • Turn taking
    • Fine motor skills
    • Health
    • Language arts
    • Food and nutrition
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Prepare the following food group pictures/symbols:

    • Protein
    • Dairy
    • Fruit
    • Vegetables
    • Grains

    2. On the top of each large sheet of construction paper, write the name of one of the five food groups. Add a matching picture/symbol of the food group if your students need picture/symbol support.
    3. Using the QuickTalker 7, create an overlay with the five food group pictures/symbols, and record the names of each of the food groups into each message location.

    What to do:

    1. Show students each of the food group pictures/symbols, and students give examples of food from that category.
    2. Students use battery-operated scissors to cut out pictures of different kinds of food, from magazines and newspapers.
    3. Place an assortment of the food pictures on the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    4. Students take turns spinning for a food picture. The teacher immediately programs the name of the food item into a BIGmack. The student uses the BIGmack to tell the others the name of the food item.
    5. The student selects the food group the item belongs in by activating a message location on a QuickTalker 7. When the correct food group is selected, the student identifies the construction paper with the matching food group word/picture symbol and glues the food picture on that sheet.

    Keywords

    quicktalker 7 | language arts | health | food and nutrition | bigmack | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  4. Farm, Farming, Farmed

    Farm, Farming, Farmed

    In this activity, students add endings to a root verb to create new tenses and use them in a sentence to confirm their understanding.

    This activity addresses:

    • Language Arts
    • Learning verb tenses
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:[/su_heading]

    Preparation:

    1. Divide the All-Turn-It Spinner’s large overlay into eight equal spaces. Write one verb in each space on the overlay and place it on the spinner. Examples: farm, paint, walk, jump, skip, wink, look.
    2. Divide the blank side of the small overlay into three equal spaces. Write the words “past tense,” “present tense” and “future tense” on the overlay, one verb tense per space.

    What to do:

    1. The student spins the arrow of the All-Turn-It Spinner by activating a switch connected to it.
    2. The students read the verb the arrow points to on the large overlay and the verb tense the arrow points to on the small overlay, and convert the verb into the correct form.
    3. The students then use the new verb form in a sentence. For example, “The past tense of bike is biked. Yesterday I biked to the store to buy an apple.”

    Alternative Options
    Use the All-Turn-It Spinner to give students practice with antonyms and synonyms. Divide the small overlay into four equal spaces and write the word ANTONYM alternately with the word SYNONYM in the blank spaces. Divide the large overlay into eight equal spaces and write practice words in the blank spaces, one word per space. Students spin the Spinner and name the synonym or antonym of the word to which the arrow points

    Keywords

    switches | learning verb tense | language arts | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |