math

  1. Math Mystery

    Math Mystery

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will use various math skills to solve a crime.

    This activity addresses:

    • Critical thinking
    • Math
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Cardboard box (for the safe)
    • Crime scene tape/crepe paper
    • Analog Clock (teaching clock, real clock, etc.)
    • Step-by-Step
    • iPad with SoundingBoard
    • TalkingBrix 2
    • Calculator
    • Various crime scene things (anything that can be placed at the crime scene to throw off your detectives)

    Preparation:

    1. Create a secret code worksheet. How the message is coded is up to you, some options include (numerical codes, transportation codes, solve the equation codes, etc.). An example message would be: To: RR, The safe is in Mrs. Swenson’s classroom. Signed, PP. Students will use this information to narrow down their suspects.
    2. Set the clock to 3:15.
    3. Record times to the TalkingBrix 2 for students to choose from.
    4. Record the script to the Step-by-Step.
    5. Print out or write on a white board the information of the 6 suspects. Students can cross off suspects that don’t fit the crime.

    What to do:

    The students will see the crime scene and must collect clues to solve the crime. Have a student activate the Step-by-Step to contact the police chief, he will give the detectives some information (you may wish to write down the 4 things he/she mentions to look for). As students progress through the activity, they will check in with him/her.

    Secret Message
    At the crime scene, there will be a crumpled up piece of paper with a message. For example: RR, The safe is in Mrs. Swenson’s class. PP
    The students must solve this piece of the puzzle to get the initials of the person in the letter.

    Broken Clock
    At the crime scene, there will be a broken clock that reads 3:15. The time on this clock is important because it will help the security guard look at the right time on the security camera.
    Students can use the TalkingBrix 2 to choose the correct time from a field of three.
    *Check in with the Police Chief with the time from the clock.*
    When the security guard checks the tape, he will see that the suspect is 6’2”.

    What was stolen?
    Left over in the safe is $13.57. The safe originally had $160.00 in it, how much was stolen? Students can use calculators or the SoundingBoard app to answer.
    *Check in with the Police Chief.*

    Script:

    “Alright detectives, we had a break in sometime last night. We don’t have a whole lot to go on. Look for clues and gather evidence. We are going to need a name, the time this happened, how tall the thief is, and how much money was stolen. I’ve faxed over a list of suspects to help you out. If you find out the time of the crime call me back, I will look over the security camera footage. Good luck.”
    “So did you get a time?”
    “Ok, just give me a minute here and I’ll see if the tape shows anything (pause) well I can’t see his face, but the suspect is 6’ 2” tall. I hope that helps. Remember we need to know who it was, and what they stole.”
    “Have you solved the crime yet detectives?”
    “Who was it and how much did they take?”
    “Good work! Why don’t you head on home for the day and rest up.”

    Character Suggestions:

      Creepy Craig Putrid Polly Queasy Quentin Revolting Ralph Rotten Roberta Stinky Stella
    Height 5’4” 5’4” 6’2” 6’2” 5’6” 4’11”
    Weight 209lbs 134lbs 161lbs 206lbs 149lbs 109lbs

    Additional Suggestions:

    Create full RAP sheets for the criminals. Cartoon mug shots can be found online.
    To make this more challenging, add extra steps students will need to solve, such as give suspect height in centimeters on the RAP sheet instead of feet and inches, provide the key for the secret message somewhere else at the crime scene, etc.
    This website will let you create a secret code worksheet:
    http://worksheetgenius.com/design.php?worksheet=codebreaker
    This can be a whole group activity, or each student can work to solve the crime independently; however, the lesson must progress as a group.
    Provide small notebooks for students to record clues.
    Choose a student to be the crime scene photographer and take pictures of clues using an iPad, Blue2, and the camera app.*

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | step-by-step | soundingboard app | math | critical thinking | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  2. Join and Separate - It's in the Bag!

    Join and Separate - It's in the Bag!

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will work on their number conservation and subitizing skills

    This activity addresses:

    • Beginning addition skills
    • Number conservation
    • Fine motor skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Locking sandwich bags
    • Small manipulatives (bingo chips, shapes, animals, etc.) must all be the same kind.
    • Permanent marker or masking tape
    • Number cards
    • Plus symbol card
    • Equals symbol card
    • BIGmack
    • Step-by-Step

    Preparation:

    1. Prepare sandwich bags by drawing or taping a vertical line down the center of the bag.
    2. If appropriate, record numbers to Step-by-Step for counting.
    3. Create appropriate overlays

    What to do:

    1. Place manipulatives in the bag; amount will vary depending on each student’s skill level. Show the student the side without the marker or tape line, and ask the students to count how many.
    2. Students count the number of manipulatives in the bag. Record this number to the BIGmack and place the corresponding number card on it.
    3. Turn the bag over, and have the students separate the manipulatives into groups on either side of the line.
    4. Have the student count the number in each new set they created. Place the corresponding number card on each side of the bag.
    5. Show the student that the two smaller sets can be joined to make the original number by placing a plus and equals signs in the correct spaces.

    Script:

    “Good, you counted 5. Can you separate the set of 5 into two smaller sets?”
    “Good, now we have sets of 1 and 4.” “1 and 4 make 5”

    Additional suggestions:

    The BIGmack should always have the original number that was in the bag recorded on it for students to reference in case they forget. The Step-by-Step should be used for counting.
    This activity can also be used for subtraction by taking a separated set away.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | number conservation | math | fine motor skills | equals symbol card | bigmack | beginning addition skills | alternative methods of access |

  3. Building a Snowman

    Building a Snowman

    In this Remarkable Idea, students work together as they take turns stapling together three sets of circles to make a snowman.

    This activity addresses:

    • Following directions
    • Turn taking
    • Sharing materials
    • Fine motor skills
    • Counting
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Cut three pairs of large circles out of white butcher paper. Each set of two paper circles should be several inches larger in diameter than the previous circle set. Paper clip each set of circles together.
    2. Cut out decorations for the snowman, such as hat, eyes, mouth, nose, pipe, button, broom, arms, etc. For each snowman decoration, create a matching symbol. These pictures/symbols should be approximately two inches in size, able to fit on the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    3. Divide the blank side of the All-Turn-It Spinner overlay into six sections and write a number 1-6 in each section.

    What to do:

    1. Read the snowman book to the students and explain what a snowman is and that they are going to make a giant snowman out of paper! Tell students that snowmen are round, and that they are going to make their snowman round, too!
    2. Students work to staple together the pairs of white circles, to be stuffed with paper snowballs. One student moves the paper or stapler, and the other student activates the Jelly/Big Beamer switch to staple the paper.
    3. Give students sheets of scrap white paper and shown how to crumple up each sheet to create a paper “snowball.” Students make paper snowballs until they have each made several.
    4. Students take turns spinning for a number, counting out that many paper snowballs, and placing them in the large paper circles, stuffing the snowman until each of the three sets of circles is full! Use the switch-adapted stapler to staple each of them shut.
    5. Place the snowman decoration pictures/symbols on the large overlay of the All-Turn-It Spinner, and put out the snowman decorations. Students take turns spinning for a snowman decoration picture/symbol, identifies the matching snowman decoration, and glues it on the snowman in the appropriate place.
    6. When the snowman is completed, the teacher and students put it on display.

    Keywords

    switches | sharing | math | jelly beamer | following directions | fine motor skills | big beamer | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |