quicktalker 7

  1. Better Breakfast Month

    Better Breakfast Month

    Did you know that Better Breakfast Month is celebrated in September? We’ve created a Remarkable Idea to help you celebrate!

    In this Remarkable Idea we’ll show you how to integrate assistive technology to make a smoothie.

    • create an accessible learning environment
    • enable students to show what they’ve learned
    • create a yummy fruit smoothie

    Keywords

    talkingbrix 2 | quicktalker 7 | powerlink 4 | italk2 with levels | following directions | choice making | candy corn | bigmack | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  2. Let's Talk Turkey!

    Let's Talk Turkey!

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about turkeys and create their own turkey puzzle to share.

    This activity addresses:

    • Animal recognition
    • Fine motor skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Pictures or photos of real turkeys
    • Black and white turkey template
    • White card stock
    • Crayons / markers / color pencils
    • Permanent black marker
    • Envelopes or resealable plastic bags (one per student)
    • Scissors
    • QuickTalker 7

    Preparation:

    1. Copy the turkey picture/template onto card stock (one per student).
    2. Record vocabulary words on QuickTalker 7.
    3. Create appropriate overlays.

    What to do:

    1. Show students the pictures/photos of real turkeys. Have students point out different parts of the turkey. Use the QuickTalker 7 to review parts and definitions.
    2. Give each student turkey template to color.
    3. Have each student cut their turkey into different pieces.
    4. Show students how they will then take the turkey picture pieces and put them together as a puzzle.
    5. Students put the puzzle pieces in an envelope/resealable bag and write the student’s name on the
    envelope/bag.
    7. The students can give their puzzle to another student. Each student then puts together the puzzle pieces they have been given to make a turkey picture!

    Vocabulary:

    Caruncle - brightly colored growths on the throat region. Hen - a female turkey.
    Poult - a baby turkey. A chick.
    Snood - the flap of skin that hangs over the turkey’s beak. Tom - a male turkey. Also known as a gobbler.
    Wattle - the flap of skin under the turkey’s chin.

    Keywords

    quicktalker 7 | fine motor skills | animal recognition | alternative methods of access |

  3. Old Time Radio

    Old Time Radio

    Podcasts are a popular media in today’s society, but they are certainly not a new concept. In this Remarkable Idea, your students will create their own radio show or podcast.

    This activity addresses:

    • Communication skills
    • Technology
    • Teamwork
    • Critical thinking
    • Creative thinking
    • Fine motor skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Optional Hardware

    • Microphone

    Free Resources

    • Sound Effects – YouTube or BoundBible.com (There are a lot of other sites, just be sure they are free. Sound effects can be expensive!)
    • Software – AudacityTeam.org (free audio recording/editing program)
    • Archive.org – listen to old radio plays (you can also search the internet for “old time radio”)
    • iTunes store/Stitcher.com – download/listen to free podcasts
    • genericradio.com – (free radio play scripts)

    Preparation:

    1. Decide on a format (Radio play, top ten music countdown, news show, talk radio, movie/book review, etc.) for your radio show, or a script from a radio play that is appropriate for your classroom and students. If you choose to come up with an original radio play, decide on some appropriate themes or settings for your students.
    2. Download “Audacity” from AudacityTeam.org to record and edit your radio show.
    3. Find some appropriate podcasts/radio shows for your students to listen to. This will give them an idea of what your lesson is all about.
    4. If you have a radio play in mind, you may wish to gather your sound effects and record them to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    5. Record the shows music intro to a BIGmack
    6. Record sound effects to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    7. Set up Audacity to record with the Hitch 2 and two Jelly Bean switches.

    • Open Audacity and go to preferences > keyboard
    • Change the shortcut for “Record” from the letter “R” to the number 0
    • Change the shortcuts for “Stop” and “Play” from the space bar to the number 3 (they share a shortcut)

    8. Plug in your Hitch 2 and Jelly Bean switches so the Recording Engineer can control the recording.

    What to do:

    1. Begin by discussing the history of home entertainment (video games, TV, radio, etc.)
    2. Play some examples of old radio shows. Ask the class if they know anything that is popular now that is similar; discuss podcasts.
    3. Play an example of a podcast.
    4. Assign roles to students and give them scripts (be sure to add symbols and marks so students know when it’s their turn to talk or to use a particular sound effect):

    • Recording engineer (the person who presses record and stop)
    • Sound designers/sound effect specialists (they will choose sound effects and add them to the show when necessary)
    • Actors/DJs/Show hosts
    • Writers (if applicable, maybe all students will be writers, maybe you will not have any writers)

    5. Record the shows music intro to a BIGmack
    6. Record sound effects to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    7. Do a read-through with your class so they can practice reading and using sound effects/music at the right time. (You may wish to record the rehearsal).
    8. On the Air! Record your show (you may need to record multiple times to get everything right.)
    9. Edit the show - you may wish to do this together as a class and ask their opinions. Do you need more/different sound effects or music? More commercials, less commercials? etc.
    10. Once you have a finished product, “export” your project from Audacity and allow your class to listen to their radio show.

    Script:

    “What are some things you like to do for fun when you’re at home?” Someone will inevitably say watch movies, TV, or play video games.
    “Before video games and television, people used to listen to the radio for fun. There used to be shows, kind of like the ones on TV that you would listen to and mentally picture.”
    “Podcasts are like radio shows that you can listen to whenever you like. They do not have a set time limit.”
    “We are going to be creating our very own radio show or podcast in our class.”

    Vocabulary:

    Podcast
    Soundscape

    Additional suggestions:

    To make recording easier for your and your students, consider recording everything separately and combining it later.
    - Record commercials in advance.
    - Record dialogue, sound effects, and music separately.
    Most if not all laptops have a built-in microphone or webcam. You can use this to record your show (Audacity will allow you to import audio from a video) or you can use an external microphone.
    Burn a copy of the radio show to a disc or distribute them digitally so your students can share the show with their families.

    Keywords

    technology | team work | talktrac | talkingbrix 2 | supertalker ft | quicktalker freestyle | quicktalker 7 | quicktalker 23 | quicktalker 12 | jelly bean switch | hitch | critical thinking | creative thinking | communication skills | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  4. Food Groups Categorizing Activity

    Food Groups Categorizing Activity

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about or review the food groups, and the types of foods that fit into each group. Students cut out pictures of foods from magazines, then select the food group that the food fits in. Students glue the food picture on a poster labeled with the corresponding food group name and/or picture/symbol.

    This activity addresses:

    • Turn taking
    • Fine motor skills
    • Health
    • Language arts
    • Food and nutrition
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Prepare the following food group pictures/symbols:

    • Protein
    • Dairy
    • Fruit
    • Vegetables
    • Grains

    2. On the top of each large sheet of construction paper, write the name of one of the five food groups. Add a matching picture/symbol of the food group if your students need picture/symbol support.
    3. Using the QuickTalker 7, create an overlay with the five food group pictures/symbols, and record the names of each of the food groups into each message location.

    What to do:

    1. Show students each of the food group pictures/symbols, and students give examples of food from that category.
    2. Students use battery-operated scissors to cut out pictures of different kinds of food, from magazines and newspapers.
    3. Place an assortment of the food pictures on the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    4. Students take turns spinning for a food picture. The teacher immediately programs the name of the food item into a BIGmack. The student uses the BIGmack to tell the others the name of the food item.
    5. The student selects the food group the item belongs in by activating a message location on a QuickTalker 7. When the correct food group is selected, the student identifies the construction paper with the matching food group word/picture symbol and glues the food picture on that sheet.

    Keywords

    quicktalker 7 | language arts | health | food and nutrition | bigmack | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  5. Know Your Friends Game Show!

    Know Your Friends Game Show!

    In this Remarkable Idea students will answer trivia questions about their classmates. This activity can be modified to allow for a review game of concepts taught in the classroom.

    This activity addresses:

    • Sportsmanship
    • Social skills
    • Turn taking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Using student interest inventories, design questions about student’s favorite colors, foods, books, etc.
    2. Teacher can write these answers on index cards to save time during game play.
    3. Record team colors (red, blue, or green) onto the corresponding TalkingBrix 2, these will act as that team’s buzzer. Students can also choose a team name to be recorded onto their TalkingBrix 2.
    4. Record “A”,”B”,”C”, and “D” onto the QuickTalker 7, as well as phrases such as “I think the answer is…” , “I know the answer is…”, and “I’m going to guess…”, students will use this to select their answers.
    5. On the QuickTalker 12 record phrases such as “Let’s get started”, “Red Team”, “Blue Team”, “Green Team”, “Nice Try”, “Correct”, “That is incorrect”, as well as other motivating game show host phrases.
    6. On the All-Turn-It Spinner, write point values for each question (100, 200, 300, etc.)

    What to do:

    1. Designate a student to be the game show host and hosts assistant (jobs can be combined if necessary) and divide the classroom into teams.
    2. Each team will choose a player to go first.
    3. The “Assistant” will choose a picture or name card for the topic, and the “Host” will use the Step-by-Step to choose a question. (Ex. John and Favorite color)
    4. The students will “buzz in” using the TalkingBrix 2. The first team to buzz in will get the chance to answer first using the QuickTalker 7. If they are incorrect the other teams can buzz in and try to answer the question.

    Keywords

    turn taking | talkingbrix 2 | sportsmanship | soundingboard app | social studies | quicktalker 7 | quicktalker 12 | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |