social studies

  1. George Washington - I Cannot Tell a Lie

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about George Washington and that he always tried to tell the truth. Learn about the difference between a truth and a lie.

    This activity addresses:

    • Language arts
    • Famous Americans
    • Social Studies
    • Choice making
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. On a Step-by-Step record the list of “Statements - True or False?
    2. Create a picture symbol for the words - sentence, yes, and no.
    3. Write each statement on a sentence strip.
    NOTE: These are examples of statements you can use. Add your own statements that relate more closely to your classroom and students.
    4. On the iTalk2 with Levels, place “yes” and “no” picture symbols, one on each side. On the “yes” message location, record the sentence, “Yes, that is true” and on the “no” message location record the sentence, “No, that is not true. It is is a lie.”

    What to do:

    1. Show students the pictures, and/or book, about George Washington.
    2. Explain that George Washington believed in always telling the truth and that he was very careful to not tell lies.
    3. Discuss with students the difference between a truth and a lie.
    4. Show students the iTalk2 with Levels and how to activate the “yes” picture/symbol to say “Yes, that is true” and the “no” picture/symbol to say, “No, that is not true. It is a lie.”
    5. Read several statements to students, one at a time.
    6. Students take turns reading a statement on a sentence strip, or using the Step-by-Step to read a statement.
    7. The student who read the statement uses the iTalk2 with Levels to say either “yes, that is true” or “no, that is not true.”
    8. The teacher confirms or redirects the student’s choice, and explains why the statement is either the truth or a lie.

    True or False Statements:
    1. We have a pet kangaroo in our classroom.
    2. The lunchroom will be serving alligator soup for lunch.
    3. We use scissors to cut paper.
    4. Books are things that we read.
    5. Our teacher’s name is (Mrs. Henrietta Hummingsworth).
    6. All the students in our class are wearing blue jeans today.
    7. We are at school today.
    8. We will leave school at 8:00 tonight.
    9. Today is (Tuesday).
    10. It snows in the summer.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social studies | language arts | italk2 with levels | famous americans | choice making | alternative methods of access |

  2. Fire at These Coordinates

    Fire at These Coordinates

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will work on plotting points on a graph, and eventually determining the slope of a line from two points on a graph.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Critical thinking
    • Math
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record the word “negative” to the TalkingBrix 2
    2. Record “Y =” to the TalkingBrix 2
    3. Record the numbers 0-5 on the Step-by-Step


    What to do:

    Level 1
    In this level, students are trying to sink ships that exist in either perpendicular or horizontal line segments.
    1. Each student will get a small piece of graph paper. The “target area” should be 5 points in each direction (100 possible coordinates).
    2. Place a divider between students if they are seated near each other.
    3. Students begin by placing their ships in either 2 dot line segment, 3 dot line segment, and 4 dot line segment. Students can use the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-Step to assist with placement by giving coordinates (ex. the coordinate (-3,2) would be given by hitting the TalkingBrix 2 to say the number is negative, then step through the Step-by-Step until the number 3 is reached. For the number 2, the student will cycle through the Step-by-Step until they come to the number 2.)
    4. Begin the assault. Each student takes a turn choosing a coordinate to attack. Students use the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-Step to give coordinates.
    5. Students continue to guess coordinates until all of the ships have been sunk. The ships must be hit on all of their points to sink.


    Level 2

    In this level, students are trying to sink one ship that exists in a diagonal, horizontal, or vertical line.
    1. In order to win, the students must give the slope-intercept formula for the line. The slope of the lines should be limited to a numerator/denominator no greater/less than (-)2 or (-)3 or the game could last extremely long.
    2. Each student will get a small piece of graph paper. The “target area” is should be 5 points in each direction (100 possible coordinates).
    3. Place a divider between students if they are seated near each other.
    4. Students begin by placing their ship (1 line, slope numerator/denominator no greater than (-)2 or (-)3.) Students can use the TalkingBrixand Step-by-Step to assist with placement by giving coordinates (at least 2 from their line) or they can give their equation using the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-step.
    Example: y = ½ - 3 would be:
    TalkingBrix 2: Y=
    Step-by-Step: 1
    Step-by-Step: 2
    TalkingBrix 2: negative
    Step-by-Stepp: 3
    5. Begin the assault. Each student takes a turn choosing a coordinate to attack. Students use the TalkingBrix 2 and Step-by-Step to give coordinates.
    6. Students continue to guess coordinate until one of them thinks they have found their opponents line and can give it in slope-intercept form. To initiate this process they will hit the “Y =” TalkingBrix 2. If the student is incorrect they lose a turn, if they are correct the game is over.


    Tips to speed up games:
    Tell each student which quadrants are empty on their opponents graphs (mention this may happen before the game begins, it may change their strategy). You do not have to tell students which quadrant is which (they should already know that anyway).

    You may wish to make one hit on a ship be enough to sink it.

    Keywords

    step-by-step | social studies | language arts | italk2 with levels | famous americans | choice making | alternative methods of access |

  3. World Traveler

    World Traveler

    In this Remarkable Idea, students will learn about other countries and cultures by “traveling around the world.”

    This activity addresses:

    • Geography
    • Social Studies
    • Cause and Effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Sponges
    • Tempera paint
    • Ink pad
    • Glue
    • Craft foam sheets
    • Wood block
    • Passport – (you can find many variations online if you search “kids passport activity” choose one that is suitable for your students)
    • Art materials –(crayons, colored pencils, markers, construction paper, scissors, glue, etc.)
    • Trays/containers (for paint)
    • PowerLink 4
    • Camera/iPad
    • Blue2 Bluetooth switch
    • CD player
    • Hitch 2 (optional)
    • Jelly Bean switch (optional)

    Preparation:

    Create the passports
    1. Take a picture of each student for the passport. Students can assist with this using either:
    The camera app on an iPad/iPod with a Blue2 Bluetooth switch as the shutter button.
    The webcam on a computer with a Hitch 2 set to mouse click and a Jelly Bean switch as the camera shutter.
    2. Print out their picture in a size that will fit in their passport.
    3. Print out a passport for each student.

    What to do:

    Each student, or group of students is assigned a country. Students should create brochures for their country that include information about it: flag, culture, notable landforms and bodies of water, music, history, type of government, money, language, etc.

    Creating your visa
    1. Create a stamp for each country’s unique visa. Stamps can be as simple as the first letter of the country’s name, or students can make their own. Using the foam sheets, have students cut out the stamp designs that will then be glued to the wood blocks.
    2. Using a mixture of 3 to 1 of tempera paint and glue to make “ink” for the stamp. Place a piece of sponge in your paint container and cover it with the “ink” of each country’s stamp.
    3. When tourists come to your country, be sure to stamp their passport!

    Creating your passports
    1. Have students glue their pictures into their passport, then sign and date them. Alternate ways to sign their name could include a name stamp, letter stamp, or digital signature.

    Travel Day
    1. Students can play music for their country. Using a PowerLink 4 and a CD player, have students take turns playing music from their countries.
    2. Presentations can be given to teach the travelers about each country. See Adapted Presentations Remarkable Idea for some tips.

    Script:

    “We will be taking a trip _____ (in the next few days, weeks, months) to various countries around the world to learn about different countries and cultures.”
    “Has anyone ever traveled outside of the country?”
    “There is a special book or document that you need to travel to other countries, does anyone know what this is called?”
    “When you arrive at a country you they give you a visa.”

    Vocabulary:

    Culture – a way of life of a group of people.
    Passport – a form of identification used when traveling to other countries.
    Visa – a stamp or document that allows you to enter or leave a country

    Keywords

    social studies | powerlink 4 | jelly bean switch | hitch | geography | cause and effect | blue2 bluetooth switch | alternative methods of access |

  4. Know Your Friends Game Show!

    Know Your Friends Game Show!

    In this Remarkable Idea students will answer trivia questions about their classmates. This activity can be modified to allow for a review game of concepts taught in the classroom.

    This activity addresses:

    • Sportsmanship
    • Social skills
    • Turn taking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Using student interest inventories, design questions about student’s favorite colors, foods, books, etc.
    2. Teacher can write these answers on index cards to save time during game play.
    3. Record team colors (red, blue, or green) onto the corresponding TalkingBrix 2, these will act as that team’s buzzer. Students can also choose a team name to be recorded onto their TalkingBrix 2.
    4. Record “A”,”B”,”C”, and “D” onto the QuickTalker 7, as well as phrases such as “I think the answer is…” , “I know the answer is…”, and “I’m going to guess…”, students will use this to select their answers.
    5. On the QuickTalker 12 record phrases such as “Let’s get started”, “Red Team”, “Blue Team”, “Green Team”, “Nice Try”, “Correct”, “That is incorrect”, as well as other motivating game show host phrases.
    6. On the All-Turn-It Spinner, write point values for each question (100, 200, 300, etc.)

    What to do:

    1. Designate a student to be the game show host and hosts assistant (jobs can be combined if necessary) and divide the classroom into teams.
    2. Each team will choose a player to go first.
    3. The “Assistant” will choose a picture or name card for the topic, and the “Host” will use the Step-by-Step to choose a question. (Ex. John and Favorite color)
    4. The students will “buzz in” using the TalkingBrix 2. The first team to buzz in will get the chance to answer first using the QuickTalker 7. If they are incorrect the other teams can buzz in and try to answer the question.

    Keywords

    turn taking | talkingbrix 2 | sportsmanship | soundingboard app | social studies | quicktalker 7 | quicktalker 12 | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |