switches

  1. Elementary, My Dear Watson

    Elementary, My Dear Watson

    In this Remarkable Idea, students test their knowledge of chemical symbols by identifying the name of the element, its molecular weight, and its location on the periodic chart.

    This activity addresses:

    • Science
    • Chemistry
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Write the chemical symbols to be reviewed on the blank side of the large overlay for the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    2. Divide the blank side of the small All-Turn-It Spinner overlay into three sections and label them element, molecular weight, and location on periodic chart.
    3. Create an overlay for the QuickTalker for each chemical symbol. 4. Record each chemicals description on the QuickTalker.

    What to do:

    1. Have students take turns activating the All-Turn-It Spinner using the switch.
    2. Students can use the QuickTalker to discuss the chemicals.
    3. Students can find the chemical on the periodic chart.
    4. Take turns until all chemical symbols have been reviewed.

    Keywords

    switches | science | quicktalker | chemistry | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  2. Building a Snowman

    Building a Snowman

    In this Remarkable Idea, students work together as they take turns stapling together three sets of circles to make a snowman.

    This activity addresses:

    • Following directions
    • Turn taking
    • Sharing materials
    • Fine motor skills
    • Counting
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Cut three pairs of large circles out of white butcher paper. Each set of two paper circles should be several inches larger in diameter than the previous circle set. Paper clip each set of circles together.
    2. Cut out decorations for the snowman, such as hat, eyes, mouth, nose, pipe, button, broom, arms, etc. For each snowman decoration, create a matching symbol. These pictures/symbols should be approximately two inches in size, able to fit on the All-Turn-It Spinner.
    3. Divide the blank side of the All-Turn-It Spinner overlay into six sections and write a number 1-6 in each section.

    What to do:

    1. Read the snowman book to the students and explain what a snowman is and that they are going to make a giant snowman out of paper! Tell students that snowmen are round, and that they are going to make their snowman round, too!
    2. Students work to staple together the pairs of white circles, to be stuffed with paper snowballs. One student moves the paper or stapler, and the other student activates the Jelly/Big Beamer switch to staple the paper.
    3. Give students sheets of scrap white paper and shown how to crumple up each sheet to create a paper “snowball.” Students make paper snowballs until they have each made several.
    4. Students take turns spinning for a number, counting out that many paper snowballs, and placing them in the large paper circles, stuffing the snowman until each of the three sets of circles is full! Use the switch-adapted stapler to staple each of them shut.
    5. Place the snowman decoration pictures/symbols on the large overlay of the All-Turn-It Spinner, and put out the snowman decorations. Students take turns spinning for a snowman decoration picture/symbol, identifies the matching snowman decoration, and glues it on the snowman in the appropriate place.
    6. When the snowman is completed, the teacher and students put it on display.

    Keywords

    switches | sharing | math | jelly beamer | following directions | fine motor skills | big beamer | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |

  3. Staying Warm Like Penguins Do

    Staying Warm Like Penguins Do

    In this Remarkable Idea, students simulate the insulation of a penguin and how they keep warm in the cold. They can then go on to make observations about the outcome and discuss the outcome they observed.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Visual follows
    • Anticipation
    • Group work
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Create two-inch pictures/symbols of “cold” and “no.” Place the pictures/symbols on the iTalk2 with Levels and record “This feels cold” and “No, this does not feel cold” on the respective locations of the iTalk2 with Levels.
    2. Record the science script on the Step-by-Step.

    • “Penguins can stay warm in places that are very cold.”
    • “We are going to do a science experiment to find out how penguins are able to stay warm in very cold temperatures.”
    • “First, we’re going to find out what it feels like when our skin touches ice.”
    • “Everybody, grab a plastic bag, but don’t fill it. Put it on your arm or on your hand.”
    • “Now take a plastic bag that’s filled with ice, and set it on top of the plastic bag on your hand. Does your hand feel cold? Each of you will have a turn to tell the class if your hand feels cold.”
    • “Now we’re going to find out what a penguin feels when it touches the ice.”
    • “Penguins have little straws under their feathers that hold air. We are going to put a bag of air on our hand. Everybody, grab a bag that has air inside, and put it on your skin. Now pick up a bag of ice and set it on the bag filled with air.”
    • “Does your skin feel cold? Everybody will get a turn to tell the class if their skin felt cold or not.”
    • “Our experiment is all done now. Who can remember why penguins stay warm on the ice and in very, very cold weather?”

    3. Fill plastic bags with ice, one bag per student.

    What to do:

    1. Show students the pictures of a penguin and the penguin climate.
    2. Explain that penguins are animals that live where it is very cold all the time.
    3. Ask if anybody knows how penguins are able to keep from freezing in the cold weather.
    4. Reads the science experiment script using the Step-by-Step or follow the instructions of the teacher.
    5. Students place an empty plastic bag on their hand, then a bag of ice on top of that.
    6. Each student uses the iTalk2 with Levels to say if their hand feels cold or not. Explain that this is how our skin feels when it touches ice - ice makes our skin feel cold.
    7. Explain that now they are going to experience what a penguin feels when it touches ice.
    8. Connect the hair dryer, PowerLink and Switch. Use these to blow air into the resealable plastic bag and seal them. Make one for each student.
    9. Place the bag with air inside of it on the back of the students hand. Explains that penguins have little straws under their feathers that keep air inside them, just like the bag keeps air trapped inside of it.
    10. Place a bag of ice on top of the air-filled plastic bag.
    11. Uses the iTalk2 with Levels to say if their hand feels cold or not. Explain that this is how a penguin feels when it’s feathers touch ice.
    12. Explain that the bag with the air in it keeps the cold ice away from our skin, so it does not make our skin feel cold. Remind students that penguins have little straws under their feathers that are like pockets of air that keep the cold away from their skin in the same way.

    Keywords

    visual cues | team work | switches | step-by-step | powerlink 4 | italk2 with levels | cause and effect | anticipation | alternative methods of access |

  4. Farm, Farming, Farmed

    Farm, Farming, Farmed

    In this activity, students add endings to a root verb to create new tenses and use them in a sentence to confirm their understanding.

    This activity addresses:

    • Language Arts
    • Learning verb tenses
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:[/su_heading]

    Preparation:

    1. Divide the All-Turn-It Spinner’s large overlay into eight equal spaces. Write one verb in each space on the overlay and place it on the spinner. Examples: farm, paint, walk, jump, skip, wink, look.
    2. Divide the blank side of the small overlay into three equal spaces. Write the words “past tense,” “present tense” and “future tense” on the overlay, one verb tense per space.

    What to do:

    1. The student spins the arrow of the All-Turn-It Spinner by activating a switch connected to it.
    2. The students read the verb the arrow points to on the large overlay and the verb tense the arrow points to on the small overlay, and convert the verb into the correct form.
    3. The students then use the new verb form in a sentence. For example, “The past tense of bike is biked. Yesterday I biked to the store to buy an apple.”

    Alternative Options
    Use the All-Turn-It Spinner to give students practice with antonyms and synonyms. Divide the small overlay into four equal spaces and write the word ANTONYM alternately with the word SYNONYM in the blank spaces. Divide the large overlay into eight equal spaces and write practice words in the blank spaces, one word per space. Students spin the Spinner and name the synonym or antonym of the word to which the arrow points

    Keywords

    switches | learning verb tense | language arts | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |