team work

  1. Old Time Radio

    Old Time Radio

    Podcasts are a popular media in today’s society, but they are certainly not a new concept. In this Remarkable Idea, your students will create their own radio show or podcast.

    This activity addresses:

    • Communication skills
    • Technology
    • Teamwork
    • Critical thinking
    • Creative thinking
    • Fine motor skills
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Optional Hardware

    • Microphone

    Free Resources

    • Sound Effects – YouTube or BoundBible.com (There are a lot of other sites, just be sure they are free. Sound effects can be expensive!)
    • Software – AudacityTeam.org (free audio recording/editing program)
    • Archive.org – listen to old radio plays (you can also search the internet for “old time radio”)
    • iTunes store/Stitcher.com – download/listen to free podcasts
    • genericradio.com – (free radio play scripts)

    Preparation:

    1. Decide on a format (Radio play, top ten music countdown, news show, talk radio, movie/book review, etc.) for your radio show, or a script from a radio play that is appropriate for your classroom and students. If you choose to come up with an original radio play, decide on some appropriate themes or settings for your students.
    2. Download “Audacity” from AudacityTeam.org to record and edit your radio show.
    3. Find some appropriate podcasts/radio shows for your students to listen to. This will give them an idea of what your lesson is all about.
    4. If you have a radio play in mind, you may wish to gather your sound effects and record them to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    5. Record the shows music intro to a BIGmack
    6. Record sound effects to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    7. Set up Audacity to record with the Hitch 2 and two Jelly Bean switches.

    • Open Audacity and go to preferences > keyboard
    • Change the shortcut for “Record” from the letter “R” to the number 0
    • Change the shortcuts for “Stop” and “Play” from the space bar to the number 3 (they share a shortcut)

    8. Plug in your Hitch 2 and Jelly Bean switches so the Recording Engineer can control the recording.

    What to do:

    1. Begin by discussing the history of home entertainment (video games, TV, radio, etc.)
    2. Play some examples of old radio shows. Ask the class if they know anything that is popular now that is similar; discuss podcasts.
    3. Play an example of a podcast.
    4. Assign roles to students and give them scripts (be sure to add symbols and marks so students know when it’s their turn to talk or to use a particular sound effect):

    • Recording engineer (the person who presses record and stop)
    • Sound designers/sound effect specialists (they will choose sound effects and add them to the show when necessary)
    • Actors/DJs/Show hosts
    • Writers (if applicable, maybe all students will be writers, maybe you will not have any writers)

    5. Record the shows music intro to a BIGmack
    6. Record sound effects to your chosen communication device (SuperTalker FT/QuickTalker (7, 12, 23, Freestyle)/TalkingBrix 2/TalkTrac)
    7. Do a read-through with your class so they can practice reading and using sound effects/music at the right time. (You may wish to record the rehearsal).
    8. On the Air! Record your show (you may need to record multiple times to get everything right.)
    9. Edit the show - you may wish to do this together as a class and ask their opinions. Do you need more/different sound effects or music? More commercials, less commercials? etc.
    10. Once you have a finished product, “export” your project from Audacity and allow your class to listen to their radio show.

    Script:

    “What are some things you like to do for fun when you’re at home?” Someone will inevitably say watch movies, TV, or play video games.
    “Before video games and television, people used to listen to the radio for fun. There used to be shows, kind of like the ones on TV that you would listen to and mentally picture.”
    “Podcasts are like radio shows that you can listen to whenever you like. They do not have a set time limit.”
    “We are going to be creating our very own radio show or podcast in our class.”

    Vocabulary:

    Podcast
    Soundscape

    Additional suggestions:

    To make recording easier for your and your students, consider recording everything separately and combining it later.
    - Record commercials in advance.
    - Record dialogue, sound effects, and music separately.
    Most if not all laptops have a built-in microphone or webcam. You can use this to record your show (Audacity will allow you to import audio from a video) or you can use an external microphone.
    Burn a copy of the radio show to a disc or distribute them digitally so your students can share the show with their families.

    Keywords

    technology | team work | talktrac | talkingbrix 2 | supertalker ft | quicktalker freestyle | quicktalker 7 | quicktalker 23 | quicktalker 12 | jelly bean switch | hitch | critical thinking | creative thinking | communication skills | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  2. Talk Like a Pirate Day (September 19th)

    Talk Like a Pirate Day (September 19th)

    Every year on September 19th, people around the world celebrate “International Talk Like A Pirate Day”. This Remarkable Idea includes activities students can participate in and have fun celebrating this wacky day with a wide range of activities that will engage all learners.

    This activity addresses:

    • Team-work
    • Social skills
    • Sensory engagement
    • Cause and effect
    • Following multi-step directions
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Pirate Ships

    • Small milk cartons
    • Straws
    • Hole punch
    • Tape/Glue
    • Construction paper
    • Battery Operated Scissors

    Ship Race

    • Aluminum tray/gutter with end caps/Rubbermaid tub (for racing area)
    • Water
    • Blue food coloring (optional)
    • Fan
    • Jelly Bean
    • PowerLink 4

    Treasure Hunt

    Pirate Parrrty
    Pirate themed snacks could include: Chips Ahoy, Goldfish crackers, Sand buckets (vanilla pudding topped with crushed butter cookies or golden Oreos), gold chocolate coins, seawater (blue or green juice), etc.

    Preparation:

    1. Record clues for the treasure hunt onto the TalkingBrix 2. Place one at the X location on the treasure map which gives students a clue to the next location, place the next TalkingBrix 2 with the next clue at that location (repeat as appropriate).

    What to do:

    Pirate Ships
    1. Have students use the Battery Operated Scissors to cut squares of construction paper for the sails of their pirate ship.
    2. Assist students in cutting one side of the milk carton off.
    3. Glue or tape the straw into the inside of the milk carton, punch two holes into the construction paper sail and slide the paper onto the straw.

    Ship Race
    1. Fill your container with water (optional: add blue food coloring to the water)
    2. Place students pirate ships into the water and give each student a straw to blow their ship across the water or use a fan connected to the PowerLink 4 and a Jelly Bean switch to blow the ship across the water. (Caution: Do not place the fan too close to the water)
    3. Allow all students the opportunity to race each other.

    Treasure Hunt
    1. Show students the treasure map.
    2. Students follow the map to find the location marked by the X on the map.
    3. When students arrive at the X they press the TalkingBrix 2 and hear the clue to the next location (ex. There be no treasure here! That scalawag Mrs. Johnson the Red must have taken it!) Students solve the clue and proceed to the next location.
    4. Students eventually find their way to the location of the treasure.

    Treasure ideas:
    Set up the Pirate Parrrty with food and drinks in your classroom while the students are on the treasure hunt. The final treasure location can be back in your classroom.

    • Prizes or costumes for the students
    • Pirate themed movie
    • Gold chocolate coins

    Additional materials, lesson plans, and even Pirate talk apps can be found at the International Talk Like a Pirate Day website here: http://www.talklikeapirate.com/teachers.html.

    Keywords

    team work | talkingbrix 2 | social skills | sensory | powerlink 4 | jelly bean switch | following directions | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  3. Making Sunshine Shakes

    Making Sunshine Shakes

    In this Remarkable Idea, students identify the different ingredients used and follow recipe directions to make Sunshine Shakes. Students can share their opinion on if they liked the shakes or did not like the shakes.

    This activity addresses:

    • Following instructions
    • Measuring ingredients
    • Group work
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Step-by-Step
    • Jelly Beamer
    • PowerLink
    • iTalk2 with Levels
    • Blender
    • Measuring cups and spoons
    • Spoons
    • 1 Cup or glas per student
    • Shake ingredients
      - orange juice (1 cup)
      - pineapple juice (1/2 cup)
      - banana (1)
      - vanilla yogurt (1/2 cup)
      - vanilla extract (1/2 teaspoon)

    Preparation:

    1. On a Step-by-Step with the “recipe” picture/symbol, record the Sunshine Shake Direction Script.

    • “We’re going to make refreshing, fruity Sunshine Shakes today!”
    • “We’re going to take turns adding ingredients.”
    • “First, somebody can measure out 1 cup of orange juice and pour it in the blender.”
    • “Now someone needs to measure out 1/2 cup of pineapple juice and add it to the blender.”
    • “We need 1/2 cup of vanilla yogurt. Who would like to measure and add the yogurt?”
    • “Who wants to peel a banana? Put the banana in the blender after it’s peeled.”
    • “We need someone to measure out 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract and put it in the blender.”
    • “Now we’ll take turns using the blender to blend together all of the ingredients.”
    • “When the shake is finished, we will pour it into cups for everyone and drink it”.

    2. Plug the blender and the Jelly Beamer into the PowerLink 4.
    3. Create a large “shake” picture/symbol card.
    4. Create “like” and “don’t like” pictures/symbols, two inches in size. Place one on either side of the iTalk2 with Levels. Record the messages, “I like the Sunshine Shake” and “I don’t like the Sunshine Shake” on the respective message locations.

    What to do:

    1. Show students the “shake” picture/symbol card. Explain to students that they are going to make Sunshine Shakes.
    2. Ask students to say what they think they will use to make a Sunshine Shake, and what a Sunshine Shake might taste like.
    3. Show students the different shake ingredients. Students name or identify each ingredient.
    4. Students take turns using the Step-by-Step to read each of the recipe direction steps to the class.
    5. Students take turns following the directions to complete each recipe step. When the blender is needed, students activate the Jelly Beamer to turn on the blender and blend up the ingredients.
    6. Students each drink a sample of the Sunshine Shake.
    7. Students use the iTalk2 with Levels to say if they liked the Sunshine Shake of if they did not like the Sunshine Shake.
    8. The teacher tallies on the board how many students liked the shake and how many students did not like the shake. The students count up the number of tallies under each different choice.

    Keywords

    team work | powerlink 4 | measuring | jelly beamer | italk2 with levels | following directions | alternative methods of access |

  4. Forever Blowing Bubbles

    Forever Blowing Bubbles

    In this Remarkable Idea, students can collaborate and perform a great experiment using bubbles!

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Spatial awareness
    • Working in a group
    • Measuring distances
    • Forces: speed of fan vs. distance traveled
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • BIG or LITTLEmack (with symbol for bubbles)
    • Jelly Beamer and a href="https://www.ablenetinc.com/original-receiver" target="_blank">Original Receiver 2 (one with symbol for fan one with symbol for bubbles)
    • PowerLink 4
    • Bubble machine and bubble solution
    • Symbols for fan and bubbles (2)
    • Electric fan
    • Newspaper
    • Tape measure
    • Something to mark distance labeled 1,2, and 3

    Preparation:

    1. Plug the Bubble machine and fan into the PowerLink 4.
    2. Create bubble and fan symbols.
    3. Link the Original Receiver to the Jelly Beamer transmitters for the Bubble machine and fan plugged in to the PowerLink 4.
    4. Record ‘I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles’ on BIG or LITTLEmack.
    5. Put newspaper on the floor to keep it from getting slippery with bubble solution.

    What to do:

    1. Have the students decide on first setting for fan.
    2. Turn on the Bubble machine.
    3. Turn on the fan.
    4. Have a student play ‘I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles’ on BIG/LITTLEmack.
    5. Let the bubbles blow until the poem is finished.
    6. Record which bubble travels the greatest distance and mark the spot where it lands with the first bubble marker.
    7. Measure the distance from Bubble machine to tin can. This is recorded against the speed setting of the fan.
    8. Repeat process using different speed settings on the fan and different positioning of the Bubble machine.
    9. Re-position the fan angle and speed. Record which fan position and speed has the greatest effect on distance traveled.

    Script:

    Recording of ‘I’m forever blowing bubbles’ into BIG/LITTLEmack.
    “I’m forever blowing bubbles.
    Pretty bubbles in the air.
    They fly so high, nearly reach the sky.
    Then like my dreams, they fade and die.
    Fortune’s always hiding.
    I’ve looked everywhere.
    I’m forever blowing bubbles.
    Pretty bubbles in the air.”

    Keywords

    team work | spatial awareness | shapes | powerlink 4 | numeracy | littlemack | jelly beamer | forces | cause and effect | bigmack | alternative methods of access |

  5. A Windy Day at the Races

    A Windy Day at the Races

    In this Remarkable Idea, students learn about wind - what it is and what it feel like. They will compete in relay races taking turns using a switch-activated hair dryer to blow a leaf (or other object) down to the FINISH line.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and Effect
    • Anticipation
    • Group work
    • Turn Taking
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    • Step-by-Step (2)
    • Jelly Beamer
    • PowerLink4
    • “Wind” picture/symbol card
    • Various lightweight objects such as cotton balls, tissue paper, plastic straw, etc.
    • Two plastic/fake leaves
    • Two long tables
    • Hair dryer (2 - each with an extension cord)

    Preparation:

    1. Plug each hair dryer (with extension cord) and Jelly Beamer into the PowerLink4.
    2. On two Step-by-Steps, place a “cheer” picture/symbol and record words of cheer/encouragement such as “Go, go, go!”, “You can do it!”, “Blow that leaf!”, “Don’t give up!”, “You’re doing great!”
    3. Set up the PowerLink4 on or near one of the long tables, and place each hair dryer at the same end of the tables.

    What to do:

    1. Show students the “wind” picture/symbol card.
    2. Explain to students that “wind” is something that we feel, and it’s a type of weather.
    3. Use a hair dryer to have students experience what “wind” feels like.
    4. Put different lightweight objects on the table, and demonstrate how the wind will blow the objects.
    5. Tell students that many times, outside, the wind will blow around leaves.
    6. Show students the two hair dryers and Jelly Beamer. Show them how to activate the switch to turn on the hair dryer and blow a leaf from one end of the table to the next.
    7. Students on each team take turns activating the switch to turn on the hair dryer and blow their leaf from one end of the table to the next and back. A
    8. While a student from each team is blowing the team’s leaf, the other students on that team take turns using a Step-by-Step to cheer on their team member.

    Keywords

    turn taking | team work | step-by-step | powerlink 4 | jelly beamer | cause and effect | anticipation | alternative methods of access |

  6. Bowling Fun for All

    Bowling Fun for All

    In the Remarkable Idea, students will have great fun throwing a ball against the bowling pins to knock them down!

    This activity addresses:

    • Turn Taking
    • Numbers
    • Teamwork
    • Cause and effect
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Connect the leaf blower to the PowerLink 4 (have power link set to timed and adjust to suit)
    2. Connect the iTalk2 with Levels to the PowerLink 4.
    3. Record cheering and words of commiseration on the iTalk2 with Levels.
    4. Connect the iTalk2 with Levels to the PowerLink 4.
    5. Record numbers 1-8 on QuickTalker 12.
    6. Create your bowling pin picture symbol for the iTalk2 with Levels, and QuickTalker 12.

    What to do:

    1. Place leaf blower on the floor and place pieces of wood to form a track.
    2. Record numbers 1 to 8 on QuickTalker 12 with overlay showing 1-8 symbols for numbers.
    3. Set bottles/bowling pins.
    4. Place ball near blower and use the iTalk2 with Levels the blower on and BOWL!
    5. Count how many pins were knocked over and press the appropriate number on the QuickTalker 12.
    6. Use the iTalk2 with Levels to either cheer or commiserate depending on the number of pins knocked down.

    Additional ideas:

    Record “Get set and go” on the QuickTalker 12.
    You can record additional phrases like:
    “Wow how many did I get?”
    “That was great, can’t wait for another for another turn”
    “Wow great shot”
    “Ahh, that was close, better luck next time”

    Keywords

    turn taking | team work | quicktalker 12 | powerlink 4 | numbers | italk2 with levels | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  7. Staying Warm Like Penguins Do

    Staying Warm Like Penguins Do

    In this Remarkable Idea, students simulate the insulation of a penguin and how they keep warm in the cold. They can then go on to make observations about the outcome and discuss the outcome they observed.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Visual follows
    • Anticipation
    • Group work
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Create two-inch pictures/symbols of “cold” and “no.” Place the pictures/symbols on the iTalk2 with Levels and record “This feels cold” and “No, this does not feel cold” on the respective locations of the iTalk2 with Levels.
    2. Record the science script on the Step-by-Step.

    • “Penguins can stay warm in places that are very cold.”
    • “We are going to do a science experiment to find out how penguins are able to stay warm in very cold temperatures.”
    • “First, we’re going to find out what it feels like when our skin touches ice.”
    • “Everybody, grab a plastic bag, but don’t fill it. Put it on your arm or on your hand.”
    • “Now take a plastic bag that’s filled with ice, and set it on top of the plastic bag on your hand. Does your hand feel cold? Each of you will have a turn to tell the class if your hand feels cold.”
    • “Now we’re going to find out what a penguin feels when it touches the ice.”
    • “Penguins have little straws under their feathers that hold air. We are going to put a bag of air on our hand. Everybody, grab a bag that has air inside, and put it on your skin. Now pick up a bag of ice and set it on the bag filled with air.”
    • “Does your skin feel cold? Everybody will get a turn to tell the class if their skin felt cold or not.”
    • “Our experiment is all done now. Who can remember why penguins stay warm on the ice and in very, very cold weather?”

    3. Fill plastic bags with ice, one bag per student.

    What to do:

    1. Show students the pictures of a penguin and the penguin climate.
    2. Explain that penguins are animals that live where it is very cold all the time.
    3. Ask if anybody knows how penguins are able to keep from freezing in the cold weather.
    4. Reads the science experiment script using the Step-by-Step or follow the instructions of the teacher.
    5. Students place an empty plastic bag on their hand, then a bag of ice on top of that.
    6. Each student uses the iTalk2 with Levels to say if their hand feels cold or not. Explain that this is how our skin feels when it touches ice - ice makes our skin feel cold.
    7. Explain that now they are going to experience what a penguin feels when it touches ice.
    8. Connect the hair dryer, PowerLink and Switch. Use these to blow air into the resealable plastic bag and seal them. Make one for each student.
    9. Place the bag with air inside of it on the back of the students hand. Explains that penguins have little straws under their feathers that keep air inside them, just like the bag keeps air trapped inside of it.
    10. Place a bag of ice on top of the air-filled plastic bag.
    11. Uses the iTalk2 with Levels to say if their hand feels cold or not. Explain that this is how a penguin feels when it’s feathers touch ice.
    12. Explain that the bag with the air in it keeps the cold ice away from our skin, so it does not make our skin feel cold. Remind students that penguins have little straws under their feathers that are like pockets of air that keep the cold away from their skin in the same way.

    Keywords

    visual cues | team work | switches | step-by-step | powerlink 4 | italk2 with levels | cause and effect | anticipation | alternative methods of access |

  8. Let's Make Hot Chocolate

    Let's Make Hot Chocolate

    In this Remarkable Idea, students can collaborate to make a delicious hot drink, which they can then go on to drink and share. This task is a great team builder.

    This activity addresses:

    • Cause and effect
    • Team work
    • Turn taking
    • Social scripts
    • Following directions
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record scripts to SuperTalker FT, iTalk2 with Levels, or Step-by-Step

    • I would like hot chocolate
    • Can you measure the milk and pour it into the container
    • Now we need to heat the milk (NOT TOO HOT!)
    • Now we need to add the chocolate
    • Can you put it in the blender and I’ll turn it on
    • Now let’s serve it to everyone

    If drinks to be offered around then following scripts could be used on a Step-by-Step:

    • Hello, my name is____________ what’s your name?
    • Would you like some hot chocolate
    • We made it ourselves
    • Here you are
    • Is it okay
    • OK thanks bye!

    What to do:

    1. Connect the blender to PowerLink and the PowerLink to Jelly Beamer
    2. Measure and pour milk into microwave safe container
    3. Heat milk to desired heat
    4. Add chocolate powder
    5. Pour chocolate milk in the blender, blend for 1 to 2 minutes.
    6. Add marshmallows
    7. Serve drinks using Step-by-Step to offer drinks.

    Keywords

    turn taking | team work | supertalker ft | step-by-step | powerlink 4 | jelly beamer | italk2 with levels | following directions | cause and effect | alternative methods of access |

  9. Mystery Key

    Mystery Key

    In this Remarkable Idea, switch tops are used as a hiding place. It’s a game for at least three players. The game can be adapted to support a wide range of curriculum goals from object permanence to social skills.

    This activity addresses:

    • Social skills
    • Visual follows
    • Cause and effect
    • Anticipation
    • Group working
    • Alternative methods of access

    What you need:

    Preparation:

    1. Record the messages on the SuperTalker FT to correspond to this Mystery Key SuperTalker Overlay".

    • Location 1: “I’ve lost my key.”
    • Location 2: “Look under the big red one!”
    • Location 3: “What about the small green one?”
    • Location 4: “Check the big yellow one!”
    • Location 5: “Where can it be?”
    • Location 6: “Is it under the tiny yellow one?”
    • Location 7: “Maybe the big blue one?”
    • Location 8: “Take a peek under the small red one!

    2. Attach student/player pictures to the All-Turn-It Spinner using Velcro dots.

    What to do:

    1. In this game, the players work together to find a missing key which has been hidden under one of the switch tops.
    2. Use the All-Turn-It Spinner and the Jelly Beamerto decide who hides the key first. While all the others look away this person hides the key under one of the switch tops. Then he calls to the other players: “I’ve lost my key. Where can it be?”
    3. Use the All-Turn-It Spinner and the Jelly Beamer once more to decide who may guess first. The SuperTalker FT might be used by just one or all the players to do the guessing (e.g. “Look under the big yellow one!”). Each player has just one guess. And the player who finds the key is the next key hider.
    4. Variation to simplify the game: The guessed switch tops can either remain in the game or are taken off the table.
    5. Variation to support more complex goals: A different letter might be hidden under each switch top. So in the course of the game letters for a particular word must be collected in the correct order.

    Keywords

    visual cues | team work | supertalker ft | jelly beamer | cause and effect | bigmack | anticipation | alternative methods of access | all-turn-it spinner |